Stretched version of the new Range Rover spotted on UK motorway

This snatched spy shot appears to show a late prototype of the rumoured long-wheelbase Range Rover.

Taken by Autocar reader Ian Bushell on a British motorway, this prototype clearly has a longer third side window and longer rear overhang. It also appears to have a longer rear door. 

Extra rear legroom is essential for both the Chinese market and breaking into the traditional executive car market, but it remains to be seen whether the bigger boot is just for luggage or might also house a pair of third-row seats.

Judging by this test car, the stretched Range Rover should be unveiled late this year.

Our Verdict

Range Rover
Range Rover has a maximum wading depth of 900mm

The fourth-generation Range Rover is here to be judged as a luxury car as much as it is a 4x4

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Comments
10

3 July 2013

Why are stretched cars popular in China? What's the Chinese facination with extra legroom?

According to Wikipedia (so it must be fact) your average male Brit is 5ft 10. Your average male American is 5ft 9.5 (I assume that's height and not waist) and your average Dutchman (Arjen Robben is the smallest Dutchman I've seen) is 5ft 11.

In the Peoples Republic of China, your average male is 5ft 5.5 in rural areas, 5ft 7 in urban areas (why the difference?). So why do the Chinese want more legroom? 

3 July 2013

It's a sign of power and success to be driven around in China. Business men don't drive themselves, they just sit in the back. All sounds silly to me.

3 July 2013

It seems to be the case that in Chinese culture uselessness can be desirable, indicating power, beauty, status etc.  For example, very long fingernails demonstrated wealth; presumably you couldn't wipe your bum (they invented bog paper) but you could afford someone to do that for you.  Likewise footbinding; any woman with 4 inch feet and atrophied muscles was not much use around the house but phew whatta scorcher.  So now we have these short arses with loads of unused space in front of their knees, simply because they can afford it.  In a sense the demand for excess leg room could be viewed as an example of westernisation, in that status is here indicated, as is often the case in western culture, by excess, rather then by uselessness. 

3 July 2013

275not599 wrote:

It seems to be the case that in Chinese culture uselessness can be desirable, indicating power, beauty, status etc.  For example, very long fingernails demonstrated wealth; presumably you couldn't wipe your bum (they invented bog paper) but you could afford someone to do that for you.  Likewise footbinding; any woman with 4 inch feet and atrophied muscles was not much use around the house but phew whatta scorcher.  So now we have these short arses with loads of unused space in front of their knees, simply because they can afford it.  In a sense the demand for excess leg room could be viewed as an example of westernisation, in that status is here indicated, as is often the case in western culture, by excess, rather then by uselessness. 

 

In the UK the aspiration is to own a house with a big lawn. Why? Because it was once seen that having land that wasn't used to grow crops, ie. uselessness, as desirable.

The UK love SUVs in their cities, where they are useless.

3 July 2013

Why are stretched cars popular in China?because Chinese  often get out with their big family,which included all kinds of pet,so they get outside need a car with extra legroom,If they get this car ,they always get a Flyingpet Dotted Leopard Square Pet Bed on the car for their pet.

3 July 2013

Having been in the back of an Audi A6L in China recently, i can only say: good. The extra legroom is extra comfort - you can choose to cross your legs if you want to without kneeing the person in front. Why are European cars always designed with such cramped leg room In the back?

3 July 2013

Will you need a HGV licence to drive one of these.

 

Cyclists own the road

3 July 2013

Glad to see JLR demand to customer needs, as with this stretch RR. China is one of the most important markets for JLR, and if thats what the customer wants, why not? I suspect a stretch RR or a 7 seat RR might sell reasonably well in the ME as well.

Is a stretch version of the XF planned, to compete with the A6 L?

 

4 July 2013

unionjack wrote:

Is a stretch version of the XF planned, to compete with the A6 L?

 

Not positive, but I think they already make one..

10 July 2013

I agree with a few of the comments stating that extra leg room is always a plus factor whenever we shop around for a car. However, it is quite surprising though that such a stretched version is to be released in the Chinese market when we all know that Europeans are pretty much taller than Asians. Nonetheless, I am sure this version of the car is going to be a hit with the additional boot space too which is definitely useful for everyone, regardless of nationality.

Thomas Williams: http://www.carid.com

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