Lightly disguised Range Rover scooped on the Isle of Mull; £100k price tag; on sale next year
6 October 2011

The all-new, 2013 Range Rover 4 flagship will be revealed at the Paris motor show - and insiders claim it will be the most radical and technically advanced car in the brand’s history.

These exclusive images - photographed by Autocar reader Greg McKenna on the Isle of Mull - show how Land Rover’s radical new range-topper will look when it replaces today’s Mk3 version, 11 years after the BMW-engineered model was first launched.

Codenamed L405, the Mk4 Range Rover picks up on the sporty styling of the new Evoque and, in so doing, drops a number of long-established Range Rover design cues. The interior will feature a big leap in quality and luxury, cementing the Range Rover firmly in the global market as an out-and-out luxury car.

The Range Rover Mk4 will be built around a new pressed aluminium monocoque, so it will be much lighter than the current car despite an increase in size. Nearly half a tonne should be lopped off the weight of today’s car. The new aluminium platform is slightly wider and around 25mm longer than today’s car.

However, the new architecture has allowed the rear wheels to be pushed further towards the back of the car. The upshot is that rear legroom has improved by as much as 125mm, allowing the rear cabin to compete against the most upmarket luxury cars. Longer rear doors will improve cabin access, too.

The new car has a more steeply raked windscreen and more of a sloping roofline than even today’s Range Rover Sport. The substantial headlamps and rear light clusters that are such a significant part of today’s car will be much slimmer and less obtrusive. Even the vent in the front wing is now dramatically slanted, reflecting the angle of the windscreen.

Although the interior design of today’s Range Rover is highly regarded, the new model is aiming even higher. Sources say the company wants to achieve “Bentley levels of craftsmanship and quality”, as befits a car that will cost over £100,000 in some guises. The luxurious interior of this year’s £130k Autobiography Ultimate Edition offers the best clues to the theme of the Mk4 model.

The car will have the same basic range of engines as today’s, including V6 and V8 diesels, and V8 and supercharged V8 petrols. However, some sources say that a petrol V6 and possibly a supercharged petrol V6 may also be offered. The new V6 made its debut in Jaguar’s C-X16 sports car concept at the Frankfurt show last month. The only V6 petrol engine currently on offer in a JLR product is a Ford unit that recently made a comeback in the XJ for sale in China only.

The new petrol V6 might also be used in a plug-in hybrid version, previewed this year in the Range_e concept. It’s expected to use a 69kW electric motor (integrated into the eight-speed automatic gearbox) with a 14kWh battery, giving it the ability to cover about 20 miles on pure electric power. The Range_e proved that a diesel-electric hybrid is possible, but a petrol-electric version is likely to be favoured because of its popularity in the US and Asia and its lower cost and weight.

All versions of the Mk4 Range Rover will be notably more economical than the current model. The main reason is the switch to the pressed and riveted aluminium monocoque. This should save about 450kg, allowing the entry-level TDV6 model’s CO2 rating to creep below 200g/km.

The new car is expected to share a floor and crash structure with the next-gen Jaguar XJ, but with a unique bulkhead, suspension mounts, seating position and subframes. The Range Rover is also expected to share a new electrical architecture with the XJ.

Jaguar Land Rover is poised to invest tens of millions in re-equipping Land Rover’s Solihull factory to build the aluminium structure. This structure will also underpin the next-gen (and seven-seat) Range Rover Sport. It could also be used for a fourth Range Rover model that would sit between the top-end Evoque and the entry-level Sport.

Our Verdict

The fourth-generation Range Rover is here to be judged as a luxury car as much as it is a 4x4

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Comments
24

2 August 2012

I could just about put up with the front ones, but this is the first time I've seen that the rear ones have "wings" too, and I really don't like them.  Otherwise though, I'm sure it will be an impressive vehicle all round.  

Let's also hope they've ironed out all the electrics before it goes on sale, and has a better nav/entertainment system (touch screen) than the existing model.

2 August 2012

It reminds me a lot of the Ford Flex. Which is an OK Car. But I wouldnt want to pay £80K for it. It looks like  Range Rover have tried to make it overly stylish. They shouldnt have bothered.

2 August 2012

Also,

I really hate those oval egg shaped side mirrors...........

289

2 August 2012

...to be honest Hilton, i am struggling to see the 'radical' elements of this car you refer to.

Yes it has a more sloping windscreen, yes it has even more awful 'trinkety Cheshire' lights than last time, but other than that it looks pretty similar.

i am sure the increased rear legroom and doors will be welcomed as this has become the 'must have' chauffer driven car...(god knows why), and getting in or out of the back of a R-R was never easy.

A bit of weight saving will always help, although I doubt the purchasers will care about a few less hydrocarbons or a few more mpg's.

I would say it is business as usual at L-R...for me, still wouldnt have one, cant rely on them - particularly out of warranty.

2 August 2012

Compared to the extrovert styling of the Evoque, the new Range Rover appears to be very conservatively styled.  For those with a 60K plus budget this may make the new Range Rover a vehicle that is nice to have rather than a must have!   Perhaps that role will be taken by the new Range Rover Sports ?   I am however sure the car will be a technical tour de force.   Finally, contrary to 289's comments. I'm on my second new Land Rover in four years and both have provided excellent reliability.

   

289

2 August 2012

@ Harry P

 .....  "Finally, contrary to 289's comments. I'm on my second new Land Rover in four years and both have provided excellent reliability".

 

...Yeh, you have had the good sense to trade-in before they reach the magic 3 years...or out of warranty!

I am sure they have some sort of 'self destruct' mechanism built in, to create humungous bills just out of warranty....thats with the exception of the air suspension sensors which just give-out at any time. 3 months old is the worst case I have seen.

2 August 2012

"Yeh, you have had the good sense to trade-in before they reach the magic 3 years...or out of warranty"

I only have the Freelander, so no air suspension issues.   I think all makes with highly complicated technology in them can give expensive issues out of warranty.   A friend with a 4 year old Audi A6 has just had to spend £1,900 replacing a "black box" in the boot because the radio/ sat nav would not work for the first 20 mins in the morning!   Until 4 years ago I would not consider a Land Rover due to their old reputation for relaibaility, after reading positive reports on the Freelander, I took a chance and have been more than pleased.  My local dealer also offers excellent after sales service.  Free collection and delivery from my office etc     

2 August 2012

My family ran a second generation Range Rover for five years and apart from regular wear and tear items, the only thing that went wrong with it was the radio.  My positive experience with the Land Rover/Range Rover brand meant that last year my partner and I bought an Evoque and that has been utterly faultless and a joy to own.

On the other hand a work colleague's first generation BMW X5 suddenly lost power due to faulty air mass sensor and suffered misfiring due to failed injectors.  Plus it eats tyres like nobody's business.

2 August 2012

Dark Isle wrote:

On the other hand a work colleague's first generation BMW X5 suddenly lost power due to faulty air mass sensor and suffered misfiring due to failed injectors.  Plus it eats tyres like nobody's business.

Well BMW did design the previous generation Range Rover, the nicked the technology to build the X5, hence both of them being unreliable.

The current JLR range are no more unreliable than any other manufacturer, and a damn sight more reliable than some other prestige marques. They are also winning numerous awards for their dealerships and aftercare . So can some people please give it a rest, its the same as those who slate Ford for the same unfounded reason. 

 

289

2 August 2012

@ Citytiger

"The current JLR range are no more unreliable than any other manufacturer, and a damn sight more reliable than some other prestige marques. They are also winning numerous awards for their dealerships and aftercare . So can some people please give it a rest, its the same as those who slate Ford for the same unfounded reason".

...well you are half right Citytiger...Jaguar have improved their reliability massively, I am afraid L-R have a long way to go despite out gunning Jaguar in sales numbers.

You can always find the odd owner who has had a good example with no issues...good luck to them, however if you work in the trade you only have to talk to prestige used car dealers to understand the issues which plague the R-R, R-R Sport & Discovery3 &4. Frankly it is not good enough and marrs an otherwise well marketed product.

Freelanders used to be the most unreliable vehicle on the road and Harry P has happily bought the latest model which has been improved out of all recognition.

Its the complex 'top models' which now need urgent attention.

The aftersales department have had to become a lot friendlier to keep their customers happy during frequent trips to the dealership on the back of a transporter.

On a trip to Milton Keynes the other day along the M40 I saw 5 breakdowns on the hard shoulder...4 of which were newish L-R product....kind of illustrates my point.

So I feel disinclined to "give it a rest" as the distrust of L-R product in the top mpdels is completely founded on fact.

If you dont like the truth fair enough but L-R will not 'up their game' all the time customers continue to shut-up and hand over the credit card.

 

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