The updated BMW 6 Series and M6 get subtle styling changes and higher-quality interiors, with prices starting from £59,430
28 May 2015

The facelifted BMW 6 Series coupé, cabriolet and GranCoupé will cost from £59,430 while the similarly tweaked respective M6 siblings will cost up to £97,300.

Receiving their first public airing at the Detroit motor show prior to the start of UK sales early this year, the changes brought to the six-strong line-up are so slight that they are likely to be barely detectable to all but the most ardent of 6 Series aficionados.

The biggest clue to the facelifted model is the exterior, which receives a series of subtle alterations. Included is a lightly reprofiled front bumper with a newly designed kidney grille, revised headlights boasting a standard LED main beam function, a reworked rear bumper and newly designed wheels (17in on six-cylinder models, 18in on more powerful V8 models).

BMW has also reacted to criticism of the interior by providing the facelifted model with higher-quality surface materials. New two-colour leather trims are among a long list of options which also includes the latest incarnation of the German car maker’s head-up display function.

The engine line-up for the 6 Series remains the same as before. However, an improvement in efficiency brings EU6 compliance across the line-up while providing marginal gains in acceleration and in-gear performance together with reduced fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

The petrol engines also receive a sports exhaust with a switchable flap as standard for what BMW describes as a “more alluring soundtrack”.

The petrol units include a twin-scroll turbocharged 3.0-litre inline six-cylinder that develops 316bhp and 332lb ft in the 640i, and a twin-turbocharged 4.4-litre V8 with 444bhp and 479lb ft in the 650i, which is claimed to hit 62mph 0.3sec faster than before at 4.6sec while going on to a top speed limited to 155mph in rear-wheel drive coupé guise.

Also available is a sequential turbocharged 3.0-litre in-line six-cylinder diesel engine. It produces 309bhp and 464lb ft in the 640d, which is claimed to offer a 2.0mpg improvement in combined cycle fuel consumption at 54.3mpg, allied to average CO2 emissions of 146mpg in the standard rear-wheel drive coupé.

As before, all new 6 Series models come as standard with an eight speed automatic gearbox boasting remote steering wheel mounted shift paddles. A raft of fuel-saving features from BMW’s EfficientDynamics program also feature, including automatic stop-start and a coasting function as part of the Eco Pro driving mode – one of five different modes from which the driver can choose.  

Buyers can also specify BMW’s xDrive four-wheel drive system. While adding 75kg to the kerb weight, it serves to enhance traction, bringing about an improvement in the standing-start acceleration on each of the new 6-series models.

The fastest-accelerating of all is the 1855kg 650i xDrive coupé with a claimed 0-62mph time that undercuts that of the standard rear-wheel-drive 650i coupé by 0.2sec at 4.4sec.

In line with standard 6 Series models, the new M6 coupé, cabriolet and GranCoupé continue to run BMW M division’s twin-turbocharged 4.4-litre V8 petrol engine with 552bhp and 501lb ft of torque.

Eschewing the eight-speed torque converter-equipped automatic gearbox of lesser 6 Series models, the rear-wheel-drive-only M6 channels drive through a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox and electronically controlled M-differential.

Performance and economy remain the same as before, with the facelifted M6 coupé boasting a claimed 0-62mph time of 4.2sec, a limited 155mph top speed, combined fuel consumption of 28.5mpg and average CO2 emissions of 231g/km.

As before, buyers of the M6 can opt for an optional Competition Package. It raises peak power by 15bhp to 567bhp, bringing about a 0.1sec improvement in 0-62mph acceleration. Further changes include detailed suspension tweaks, more direct steering ratio and unique 20-inch wheels.

All 6 Series models come in the same trims as before, with SE, Sport, M Sport offered on the standard cars. All models all come with LED headlights included while the SE models get a new leather instrument panel with contrast stitching. The Sport models add the contents of the old Sport pack as well as bi-colour Nappa leather comfort seats with lumbar support and 19in alloys. M Sport models get Nappa leather upholstery.

The equivalent coupe and four-door Gran Coupe models cost the same throughout the range, ranging from £59,430 for the 640i SE to £72,390 for the 650i M Sport. The equivalent convertible model adds between £5600 and £5900 to the price.

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Our Verdict

BMW 6 Series coupé
The 6 Series shares its plaform with models as diverse as the 5 Series and Rolls-Royce Ghost

The BMW 6 Series is a superbly accomplished car, unless you’re a driving enthusiast

11 August 2014

Question,why not make the 6 series a bit more like a low rent i8?,wouldn't a no frills,no hybrid 6 series look good,maybe at a more affordable starting price of say £35K......?,what say you all?

Peter Cavellini.

11 December 2014
Quote:

...the 1855kg 650i xDrive coupé..

And that's the 6-series's main problem. Weight! You gotta ask why an (otherwise fine) GT coupe weighs as much as a full size executive saloon, like its 5-series sibling.

rjv

11 December 2014

well 1700-1800 kg for a BMW 6 series has never been pointed out as anything wrong with the car by autocar but when it comes to lexus RCF the 1800kg is a serious issue affecting the perfomance, handling and what ever good you can think about that car

truecarfan

11 December 2014
rjv wrote:

well 1700-1800 kg for a BMW 6 series has never been pointed out as anything wrong with the car by autocar but when it comes to lexus RCF the 1800kg is a serious issue affecting the perfomance, handling and what ever good you can think about that car

You're comparing cars from two different classes. The RCF is comparable to an M4, which weighs 300kg less. The M6 is more in line with a Maserati GranTurismo, which weighs a very similar amount.

@Overdrive: It weighs a similar amount to a 5 Series because it shares its platform, engines and many other components. A slightly swoopier body shape isn't going to make it much lighter.

11 December 2014

GTP_Ingram and RJV - good points by both of you. I think the Lexus is more affected by its weight as it has a normally aspirated engine, the M6 has a twin turbocharged unit pushing out a serious amount of torque which will help overcome the weight problem.

11 December 2014

There are some dreadful screen reflections in pic. 5. I hope these are 'ehanced' to show the headsup screen...

11 December 2014

Face lifts tweeks and tucks - they just wipe off thousands from the model you just bought and cherrished. Interior tweeks yes - exterior tweeks only means they didnt get it right to start with

what's life without imagination

11 December 2014

I struggling to see the differences.

11 December 2014

Exactly what would the people who constantly point out the increasing weight of cars suggest that the average user would be prepared to give up to have lighter cars back? Would the average user like to give up the space, safety or luxury of modern cars to save weight or would they like to pay a lot more to have a vast amount of exotic materials used to reduce the weight that way? I would suggest that the average user wouldn't want any of the above and probably doesn't even notice the effects of any extra weight gained from one outgoing model to the next. Cars used to be lighter because there was nothing to them relatively speaking. How many brand new 3 series do you think would sell if it suddenly had no kit, no safety features what-so-ever and was no bigger than the tin box they were driving in the 80's?? But hey, "At least it only weights 1100kg" the sales person would be able to say because that's all that anyone's really worried about when they buy a car! Love the M6 Gran Coupe buy the way, it's right up there with the original Maserati GTS for me

XXXX's intellect just went POP!

12 December 2014
gigglebug wrote:

Exactly what would the people who constantly point out the increasing weight of cars suggest that the average user would be prepared to give up to have lighter cars back? Would the average user like to give up the space, safety or luxury of modern cars to save weight or would they like to pay a lot more to have a vast amount of exotic materials used to reduce the weight that way? I would suggest that the average user wouldn't want any of the above and probably doesn't even notice the effects of any extra weight gained from one outgoing model to the next. Cars used to be lighter because there was nothing to them relatively speaking. How many brand new 3 series do you think would sell if it suddenly had no kit, no safety features what-so-ever and was no bigger than the tin box they were driving in the 80's?? But hey, "At least it only weights 1100kg" the sales person would be able to say because that's all that anyone's really worried about when they buy a car! Love the M6 Gran Coupe buy the way, it's right up there with the original Maserati GTS for me

Cars don't necessarily have to give up equipment and space in order for them to be made lighter. Lighter materials, e.g. aluminium, carbon fiber etc and modern manufacturing techniques can all help to reduce weight. It just needs investment and willingness on the part of the manufacturers to do it.

Yes, in the short term this might mean a price increase on some cars, but in the long term the prices will come down and with reduced fuel consumption/emissions , better driving dynamics, it will be definitely be worth it. And to be fair, the likes of BMW have already started down this road. It is rumoured the next 6-seies will up to 200kg lighter than the current one.

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