Audi wants to recapture the impact made by the original TT in the design of its third-generation car
3 November 2012

Audi will mix design elements of both the current TT and the original when creating the third-generation car, according to insiders close to the project. The aim, they say, is to recapture some of the distinctiveness and impact of the first-generation car. 

There’s a feeling in some quarters of Audi that the striking Bauhaus style of the first Audi TT - distinguished by a strongly functional shape largely untroubled by ornamentation - should be revived in the next car, which will make its debut as a coupé in 2014, with a roadster arriving the following year.

The latest version of the TT will be based on the new VW Group MQB platform, whose architecture allows for a shorter front overhang and a longer wheelbase relative to the car’s overall length. 

The new TT will have wider tracks, too, but the overall size of the car will be little changed. 

Audi’s latest six-corner grille, more angular headlights and contoured clamshell bonnet will all feature, along with the trademark rounded tail and motorised tail spoiler. It’s believed that the wheel arches will also have greater sculptural emphasis.

The new TT will have a chassis set-up intended to deliver a more engaging drive than the current car’s, Audi’s dynamic target being the Porsche Boxster

To this end, there will be a higher aluminium content in the TT’s structure to further reduce mass. Today’s base model weighs an already competitive 1240kg. 

As now, there will be front-wheel-drive and four-wheel-drive options. 

Engines will include the latest slimmed-down 1.8-litre and 2.0-litre EA888 petrol engines, which will include fuel-saving cylinder deactivation. A mildly updated direct injection 2.0-litre diesel will also be in the line-up. In 2015 a reworked version of the 2.5-litre five-cylinder engine will make its debut in a new high-performance TT RS.  

Inside, Audi is again aiming to set new standards of fit and finish, to maintain the TT’s position as a compact coupé — and roadster — that’s strong on design and sophistication.

Our Verdict

The Audi TT remains a design icon, and is now a car that’s genuinely fun to drive no matter what engine or trim you choose

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Comments
28

3 November 2012

There’s a feeling in some quarters of Audi that the striking Bauhaus style of the first Audi TT - distinguished by a strongly functional shape largely untroubled by ornamentation - should be revived in the next car

Would that be the original  functional shape, that was unstable at high speed, flipped over and killed a few people and had to be recalled for major modification and the the addition of an "ornamental" rear spoiler..  Some people have short or selective memories it appears..

3 November 2012

Citytiger wrote:

There’s a feeling in some quarters of Audi that the striking Bauhaus style of the first Audi TT - distinguished by a strongly functional shape largely untroubled by ornamentation - should be revived in the next car

Would that be the original  functional shape, that was unstable at high speed, flipped over and killed a few people and had to be recalled for major modification and the the addition of an "ornamental" rear spoiler..  Some people have short or selective memories it appears..

Was nothing to do with the shape... Basically the car had the same lift off oversteer characteristic as the 205 GTi and the 911... Those cars would catch people out but generally the drivers had some idea of what they were doing behind the wheel. Porsche and Peugeot didn't modify the product accordingly... Mk1 TT's were brought more by people eager to be seen in them, posers rather than driving enthusiats. A few people died but the MK was never left with a 'bad rep.' I had one for 6 years and not one person said to me ooh they kill people! It never had the reputation I you think. Audi blinked and the car became just an ok drive. I had a 205 GTi 1.9 back in the day and it's rep never bothered me. Audi should left well alone.

4 November 2012

Chillipepper wrote:

 A few people died but the MK was never left with a 'bad rep.' I had one for 6 years and not one person said to me ooh they kill people! It never had the reputation I you think. Audi blinked and the car became just an ok drive. I had a 205 GTi 1.9 back in the day and it's rep never bothered me. Audi should left well alone.

Oh thats OK then, as long as it only killed "a few people" there is nothing to worry about, proves a point really, some people buy a badge not a car, as you said bought by possers not enthusiasts, there was no excuse for getting it wrong because VAG had proven with the Corrado that they could build a car that handled brilliantly, far better than the TT.

4 November 2012

Citytiger wrote:

Chillipepper wrote:

 A few people died but the MK was never left with a 'bad rep.' I had one for 6 years and not one person said to me ooh they kill people! It never had the reputation I you think. Audi blinked and the car became just an ok drive. I had a 205 GTi 1.9 back in the day and it's rep never bothered me. Audi should left well alone.

Oh thats OK then, as long as it only killed "a few people" there is nothing to worry about, proves a point really, some people buy a badge not a car, as you said bought by possers not enthusiasts, there was no excuse for getting it wrong because VAG had proven with the Corrado that they could build a car that handled brilliantly, far better than the TT.

I knew I'd left myself wide open with what I said but a mid engined car can let go without warning, 911's have a similar reputation but drivers learnt to deal with it or kept away from the edge. Of course posers bought it, they buy things... their money is as good as anyone else's. 

If VAG got it wrong, it's more that they completely newtered the TT, tame and uninvolving. Maybe Peugeot with the 205 & 306 GTi's got it just right???

4 November 2012

Chillipepper wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

Chillipepper wrote:

 A few people died but the MK was never left with a 'bad rep.' I had one for 6 years and not one person said to me ooh they kill people! It never had the reputation I you think. Audi blinked and the car became just an ok drive. I had a 205 GTi 1.9 back in the day and it's rep never bothered me. Audi should left well alone.

Oh thats OK then, as long as it only killed "a few people" there is nothing to worry about, proves a point really, some people buy a badge not a car, as you said bought by possers not enthusiasts, there was no excuse for getting it wrong because VAG had proven with the Corrado that they could build a car that handled brilliantly, far better than the TT.

I knew I'd left myself wide open with what I said but a mid engined car can let go without warning, 911's have a similar reputation but drivers learnt to deal with it or kept away from the edge. Of course posers bought it, they buy things... their money is as good as anyone else's. 

If VAG got it wrong, it's more that they completely newtered the TT, tame and uninvolving. Maybe Peugeot with the 205 & 306 GTi's got it just right???

Since when was the TT mid engined? its front engined with either front or AWD, seeing as you owned one for 6 years I though you may have noticed,  based on a Golf mk 4 chassis, the Golf mk 4 was poor as well, the GTI was a bloated joke,  oh and you cant compare a 911 to a TT, one is a family hatchback in a posh frock, the other is a race inspired sports car. 

4 November 2012

Yes I had one for 6 years so of course I knew where the engine was.... I never said the TT was mid-engined, didn't even mention it in my opening paragraph. Yes I had one so you are wasting your time telling me the different drive configurations available and it's chassis origins. If the French can turn a Clio shopping trolly into a top natch handling car then VAG really have no excuse... The Mk4 golf GTI was bloated/heavy but the TT wasn't.

I wasn't comparing a TT to a 911... Just pointing out a 911 could kill you in a similar way!

3 November 2012

A bit like going to the plastic surgeon,a tuck there, a nip there,all to get the new MQB chassis underneath.............oh, and the price will go up.

Peter Cavellini.

3 November 2012

What made the original stand out so much was the front section which wasn't adorned with the "corporate" nose.  You could see the design was thought of as a complete package, rather than a car that was designed first and run past committees afterwards, like the current car.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

3 November 2012

Dissapointed, from the headline with mention of roots I thought it was a gag about being like the 1st model - a bit of a hairdressers car...

3 November 2012

My wife has a current generation TT Cabrio Deisel Quattro , I never really loved it much, much preferred her previous Duratec engined MX5. Now three years old, through circumstance, I've been driving it quite a bit recently and have been very surprised as to what an excellent car it is. On winter tyres, in this chilly weather, it's cross country ability is remarkable, the platform appears very stiff, no sign at all of scuttle shake, even with it rheological dampers in there stiff setting. Also driving it quite hard, the fuel consumption is remarkably low , I like open top motoring, and the electrically operated hood is brilliant. We recently tried a new generation Boxter S which we both thought was fabulous in every way, except that for my wife the lack of winter security living without four wheel drive is a big minus, the TT has a more useable boot, to our taste, the trim is better, and finally, looking at the fuel computer on the Boxter showed 26mpg, our TT shows over the last 17000 miles 40mpg. Conclusion, wait for the next generation TT .

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