Land Rover has finalised the design of the replacement for its 66-year-old icon, due to expire in 2015, but don't expect it to look like the DC100 concept
8 August 2014

Land Rover has ‘frozen’ the final shape of its next, all-new Defender – and the company says that it will look very different from the DC100 and DC100 Sport concepts unveiled three years ago by design boss Gerry McGovern.

The DC models were shown in 2011 with the specific intention of kick-starting the discussion about the future of Land Rover’s oldest and most iconic model, and they generated worldwide controversy and debate.

The company says that its new design won’t be a direct replacement for the 66-year-old original when that ceases production at the end of next year. Bosses are currently busy discussing what interval should elapse between the outgoing model’s demise and the new edition’s debut.

Another important discussion point is believed to be whether Land Rover should reveal parts of its new Defender plan early, via a more focused design concept. Company bigwigs acknowledge that for many of the faithful, the original Land Rover remains at the heart of what the company does, even though it has not contributed significantly to profits for many years.

Industry watchers say that Land Rover’s key challenge will be to come up with an all-new family of ‘premium durability’ Defenders – possibly built on a unique platform – that are capable of generating annual sales of more than 50,000 units, which would enable economic viability.

The DC100 concept, first shown at the 2011 Frankfurt show and later made available for limited driving exercises in California, won approval for its simplicity and freshness but created controversy among Land Rover traditionalists. 

Within the company, the DC100 is now viewed as “a little too generic”, and the production model’s design is understood to retain the simplicity but be more adventurous.

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The Land Rover Defender is an institution and unbeatable off road, if crude on it

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29

9 August 2014
I hope they make something like the DC100 the sport version and 3 door looked great ,perhaps that would be the more premium with a cheaper new Defender alongside.

9 August 2014
The words premium and Defender should not go together. Given the suggestion that the next Defender will not be a direct replacement, I wonder if the Defender name plate should be used at all.

9 August 2014
Why has the Defender become great? And why has the Landcruiser taken over from it? Answer those two questions and you have the form the new Defender has to follow.

9 August 2014
The Landcruiser hasn't taken over from it.


9 August 2014
Winston Churchill wrote:
The Landcruiser hasn't taken over from it.
In places like Australia they used to buy Land Rovers, now it's all Landcruisers. It's said the Land Rover will get you anywhere you want to go, but the Landcruiser will get you back!

10 August 2014
Symanski wrote:
Winston Churchill wrote:
The Landcruiser hasn't taken over from it.
In places like Australia they used to buy Land Rovers, now it's all Landcruisers. It's said the Land Rover will get you anywhere you want to go, but the Landcruiser will get you back!
That's mainly because of the end of the British Empire, the proximity of Japan / massive market share of Jap cars in APAC and taxation on cars. Reliability has practically nothing to do with it. Don't let the facts get in the way of a nice sound bite though eh?


9 August 2014
There's that word 'premium' again. Thought Discovery was going to be Land Rover's premium family and Defender was going to be their workhorse family. That kind of made sense and seemed like a sensible enough strategy to follow. But they just can't help themselves, can they? Premium this, premium that, blah, blah, blah. And another thing, Quote: 'Bosses are currently busy discussing what interval should elapse between the outgoing model's demise and the new edition's debut'. I really have heard it all now. I know this might sound a bit leftfield, but how about debuting the new edition when it's actually ready to go on sale. Anyway, I for one can't wait to find out how much of a time lapse they decide upon and exactly how they came to that decision. As it's not even going to be a direct replacement does it really matter in the end. Personally, I liked the DC100 concepts and thought they were an excellent interpretation of what a modern-day Defender should look like. Hope I won't be disappointed with the final production versions.

10 August 2014
With these sort of inept management decisions, you would think JLR are back in the dark days of British Leyland, build it and it will sell, stop faffing about and sort it out, why doest it take so long for one of their products to come off the drawing board.

10 August 2014
Oh, so the Landcruiser HAS taken over. but for different reasons. They sell more because they have a bigger market share.

10 August 2014
275not599 wrote:
Oh, so the Landcruiser HAS taken over. but for different reasons. They sell more because they have a bigger market share.
I wouldn't say the Defender has EVER had a massive market share outside if the armed forces. Remember, Defender only came in 1990. Prior to that it was the 90/110 and then the Series 3. Stop picking holes in others' arguments and create on of your own.


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