DS boss Yves Bonnefont has shed light on how the PSA Group will manage the introduction of new technology among its three car brands
21 January 2016

DS will develop its own car technology, in addition to sharing systems with sister brands Peugeot and Citroën, according to company boss Yves Bonnefont.

Speaking at the launch of the new DS 3 in Paris this week, Bonnefont shed more light on how the three brands will deal with the introduction of new technology in its vehicles.

“The Group has defined a technology road map containing three paths,” he said. “First there is technology that will be shared between the three brands because they are the core elements.

“Second, there is technology where one brand will take the lead for two or three years to establish the technology, which can then spread to the other brands. Finally there is technology that’s fully dedicated to one brand.”

With DS being positioned as the premium brand within the PSA Group, Bonnefont said it is “aspiring to launch a number of new technologies for the group”. Its recent concept cars, such as the Wild Rubis created for the Shanghai motor show in 2013, have placed an emphasis on technology, such as plug-in hybrid systems.

DS will spearhead PSA’s efforts in terms of electrification and plug-in hybrid technology, but Bonnefont hinted that other ideas are also being developed for the company’s future cars.

“We are revisiting the technology associated with chassis because this is something coming from our DNA,” he said, in reference to the revered original DS that went on sale in 1955.

“It is a DNA we share with Citroën. Citroën will follow its route, and we will go our own route, both of us with different technologies developed according to our own DNA.”

DS officials have confirmed that work is underway on a bespoke suspension system for its cars that's separate from the system being developed by Citroën.

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5

21 January 2016

Getting tired of hearing about this now. Its not going to work. Especially when the DS website is so mediocre, they also need separate dealerships. No one buying a premium car wants to buy from a mainstream showroom

21 January 2016
Sam_notts wrote:

they also need separate dealerships. No one buying a premium car wants to buy from a mainstream showroom

It's a shame they didn't take the opportunity to ditch the dealership model altogether with the new brand. Very few people actually want to buy a car from a typical car showroom environment, regardless of how premium. A new 'premium' brand would have given PSA the perfect excuse to create a new retail model.

21 January 2016
Sam_notts wrote:

Getting tired of hearing about this now. Its not going to work. Especially when the DS website is so mediocre, they also need separate dealerships. No one buying a premium car wants to buy from a mainstream showroom

I did read a while ago that they were planning unique DS dealerships, with, amongst other things, soft touch walls (if my memory serves me right). I just hate those hard walls, don't you?

21 January 2016

DS so far has been lipstick on a litter of piglets. There's nothing premium about extra chrome on an out-of-date Citroen. Premium has to be a ground up experience. It's good to hear they will develop their own technology, but they really need to get themselves a proper, decent, premium chassis and engines to go with them. The car needs to be as quiet, smooth-riding and sure handling as an Audi or Jag or Merc. Only when you get the basics right can you start messing about with chrome. The marque name is a fundamental problem outside France too. You'd never get Rolls Royce calling themselves RR officially. Premium cars need a premium name, not a couple of random letters. It's not as though everyone here is going to start pronouncing it Déesse is it?

21 January 2016

It's complete nonsense, trying to propagate the myth that DS is a stand-alone company with its own engineers and in-house technology that it might deign to "share" with Citroen or Peugeot. Also, all this guff about them developing a unique suspension system is simply an attempt to distract us from the fact that DS currently has no USP. All that said, I can now appreciate why they are trying to create a semi-premium brand separate from Citroen: I'm in Tenerife as I write this and there are white Citroen C-elyesée saloons everywhere, an ugly and ultra basic car that makes Dacias and Skoda Rapids look sophisticated by comparison. Of course, PSA had a potential semi-premium brand in Peugeot, which could have been positioned upmarket of Citroen, but they squandered that opportunity years ago.

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