Mid-engined 4C to be joined by an open-top version a year after the coupé goes on sale in early 2014
10 August 2012

Alfa Romeo’s new mid-engined 4C sports car will spawn a convertible version around a year after launch, sources have confirmed. The 4C coupé is expected to be shown around 12 months from now, ahead of going on sale in early 2014.

Fiat’s engineering chief, Mauro Pierallini, has previously outlined a target price of €45,000 (£35,500) for the 4C and a 900kg kerb weight. 

It will be powered by Alfa’s direct-injection 1750 TBi turbo four, and if it meets its weight target the 4C is expected to hit 62mph in 4.5sec.

The 4C will be the halo car for the reinvention of Alfa and is intended to showcase both styling presence and technical excellence. It will feature the new-generation 1750 engine, with an aluminium block rather than cast iron (saving 25kg) as well as upgrades to the high-pressure fuel injection. The engine will drive a dual-clutch automatic transmission equipped with paddle shifters.

Early development of the car was carried out by Italian race-car specialist Dallara, which developed the carbonfibre structures for the Alfa 8C, Bugatti Veyron and the KTM X-Bow. However, Alfa has subsequently taken the development process in-house, handing responsibility to a small specialist team headed by Pierallini.

Aluminium subframes, bolted to the carbonfibre tub, carry the running gear and powertrain, while the 4C’s exterior panels are made from sheet-moulded composites. The 4C’s shape is also said to generate positive downforce, improving the high-speed grip.

Great efforts are being made to translate the 4C’s dramatic interior styling into production, although it won’t be an exact copy of the concept car. Pierallini says Alfa will build 18,000 4Cs over the lifetime of the car, although the factory that will make it has yet to be chosen.

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Alfa Romeo 4C

The 4C is Alfa's first true driver's car for decades, and it shows how brilliantly a small turbo four can go and sound in a lightweight package

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Comments
13

10 August 2012

Pretty sure the curent 1750 engine also has an aluminium block

10 August 2012

typos1 wrote:

Pretty sure the curent 1750 engine also has an aluminium block

No it doesn't. It is the last remaining petrol Family B engine, sharing its basic cast iron block with the 1.6, 1.9 and 2.0 JTD/MJ as well as the previous Family B Petrol (the Barchetta engine and the  TS 16v as found in the 145/146/166/147/156/GT)

10 August 2012

giulivo wrote:

typos1 wrote:

Pretty sure the curent 1750 engine also has an aluminium block

No it doesn't. It is the last remaining petrol Family B engine, sharing its basic cast iron block with the 1.6, 1.9 and 2.0 JTD/MJ as well as the previous Family B Petrol (the Barchetta engine and the  TS 16v as found in the 145/146/166/147/156/GT)

 

Yeah the 1750 is a sort of experimental development of the JTD blocks, namely the 1.6 and 2.0.  It has an iron block with the bore of the 2.0 JTD and the stroke of the 1.6 JTD.  And its really rather a peach of an engine.  I have a Giulietta Cloverleaf and REALLY REALLY want the 4C!

2 January 2013

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      KeepMyFamilySecure

10 August 2012

That is a seriously good looking car and tantalisingly close to being atainable to a wide market.  The light torquey engine is perfect for a lightweight car like this. 

This forum is dead, don't bother...

10 August 2012

This will hopefully be a great car but Alfa is making the same mistake as with the 8C. Why limit the production? If people want it just build it. And another, at least for me, no manual? I bet manual would be not only cheaper but lighter and in my mind pure sport car like this still should have a stick shift. And the price is creeping up and up and we are still over a year from seeing the production car.

10 August 2012

integrale90 wrote:

This will hopefully be a great car but Alfa is making the same mistake as with the 8C. Why limit the production? If people want it just build it. And another, at least for me, no manual? I bet manual would be not only cheaper but lighter and in my mind pure sport car like this still should have a stick shift. And the price is creeping up and up and we are still over a year from seeing the production car.

The number limit will be because of the carbon tub. You can only make a certain number of tubs with each mould; Lamborghini are only making a certain number of moulds for the Aventador, for instance, unless there is huge demand for it after the first 4000 or something (can't remember exact details).

If it were aluminium, it would be what you said: a build-as-many-as-you-can-sell mini-supercar.

Hopefully it doesn't hit these shoes until very late 2014, so I have a chance to save up for one.

10 August 2012

I'm not quite sure where this will sit in Alfa's range when the next Spider will be competing in the same segment against the same rivals, and the same goes for the 4C Coupe should the GTV be replaced too. Considering Alfa isn't in the best of health, the last thing they need to do is to go to the expense of developing and building separate models in the same class.

What Alfa could do with is a halo car, perhaps a supercar to compete with the likes of the Gallardo and MP4-12C. And considering Ferrari is a stablemate, why not have a car based on the 458. If it looked sublime, it would sell on its looks alone and just Alfa the lift it so desperately needs. And if it drove as well as the 458, even better.

10 August 2012

Lanehogger wrote:

I'm not quite sure where this will sit in Alfa's range when the next Spider will be competing in the same segment against the same rivals, and the same goes for the 4C Coupe should the GTV be replaced too. Considering Alfa isn't in the best of health, the last thing they need to do is to go to the expense of developing and building separate models in the same class.

What Alfa could do with is a halo car, perhaps a supercar to compete with the likes of the Gallardo and MP4-12C. And considering Ferrari is a stablemate, why not have a car based on the 458. If it looked sublime, it would sell on its looks alone and just Alfa the lift it so desperately needs. And if it drove as well as the 458, even better.

This will sit above the Spider. The new Spider is supposed to be in the £20-30k category, whereas the 4C will be around £45k.

The 4C will also be much more focussed (i.e. compromised) than the front-engined, rear-driven Spider, and will be faster as well. The 4C will be Alfa's halo car, but one they can sell enough of to make a nice profit in the EU and especially US, and there will be enough on the road to keep interest in Alfa high while they put the finishing touches on the Giulia (which cannot come soon enough, and will need to be fantastic).

There is nothing about Audi which Alfa cannot replicate easily; Audi are selling more cars than anyone despite the fact they are unreliable (we have 4 in our family, and have had several more in the past before anybody tries to tell me I'm wrong), not particularly inspiring to drive, have an average dealer's network and all look the same as the previous versions (albeit half of the range is still attractive).

I see a few Giuliettas/Mitos, but cars like the 4C and Giulia are crucial so people keep Alfa in their mind, and even if they can't get a 4C/Giulia, they want an Alfa over the competition. Will help them secure some more orders for the hatches.

10 August 2012

Ubizzle wrote:

Lanehogger wrote:

I'm not quite sure where this will sit in Alfa's range when the next Spider will be competing in the same segment against the same rivals, and the same goes for the 4C Coupe should the GTV be replaced too. Considering Alfa isn't in the best of health, the last thing they need to do is to go to the expense of developing and building separate models in the same class.

What Alfa could do with is a halo car, perhaps a supercar to compete with the likes of the Gallardo and MP4-12C. And considering Ferrari is a stablemate, why not have a car based on the 458. If it looked sublime, it would sell on its looks alone and just Alfa the lift it so desperately needs. And if it drove as well as the 458, even better.

This will sit above the Spider. The new Spider is supposed to be in the £20-30k category, whereas the 4C will be around £45k.

The 4C will also be much more focussed (i.e. compromised) than the front-engined, rear-driven Spider, and will be faster as well. The 4C will be Alfa's halo car, but one they can sell enough of to make a nice profit in the EU and especially US, and there will be enough on the road to keep interest in Alfa high while they put the finishing touches on the Giulia (which cannot come soon enough, and will need to be fantastic).

There is nothing about Audi which Alfa cannot replicate easily; Audi are selling more cars than anyone despite the fact they are unreliable (we have 4 in our family, and have had several more in the past before anybody tries to tell me I'm wrong), not particularly inspiring to drive, have an average dealer's network and all look the same as the previous versions (albeit half of the range is still attractive).

I see a few Giuliettas/Mitos, but cars like the 4C and Giulia are crucial so people keep Alfa in their mind, and even if they can't get a 4C/Giulia, they want an Alfa over the competition. Will help them secure some more orders for the hatches.

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