New naturally aspirated rotary could go in to production within five years

Mazda has confirmed that it is still continuing to develop its rotary engine, which last saw production use in the Mazda RX-8.

The Wankel rotary engine was removed from Mazda's line-up due to its low efficiency. It wasn't able to meet stricter emissions regulations and it suffered high-fuel consumption for its output.

SkyActiv, a recent series of technologies developed by Mazda, focused heavily on improving the efficiency of combustion in an engine. Advances resulting from the project could be applied to the rotary engine in order to improve its economy and output.

The manufacturer also believes that there are considerable gains to be had by utilising more advanced ignition systems. This would further serve to boost performance while reducing consumption and emissions.

A Mazda engineer told Autocar that he’d like to see the new rotary in production within five years but, at the current moment in time, nothing is confirmed.

If it were to go in to production, the new engine would initially be offered in naturally aspirated form, with turbocharged versions following if testing proved them reliable. 

Mazda boss, Takashi Yamanouchi, has stated that research into future rotary engines will continue as long as he works at the company. "The challenger spirit that has made us the world leader in rotary engines is still alive and well at Mazda."

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Comments
21

22 February 2013

Glad someone is.

22 February 2013

You can't beat a good Wankel.

22 February 2013

Mac Magog wrote:

You can't beat a good Wankel.

 

after reading this article I'm really looking forward to a good wankel too.....5 years is going to be a frustratingly long time to wait!

22 February 2013

Not to mention

22 February 2013

nick644uk66 wrote:

Mac Magog wrote:

You can't beat a good Wankel.

 

after reading this article I'm really looking forward to a good wankel too.....5 years is going to be a frustratingly long time to wait!

Not to mention the emissions

22 February 2013

In the 60s Rolls Royce (aerospace) developed a twin rotor diesel wankel engine (one was used as a supercharger). This would be a good way for Mazda to go - rotary engines rev very high, make good power and are very smooth, but are bad on fuel and make very little torque. Diesels are low revving, dont make such good power and are often criticsed for their rough running, but are good on fuel and make masses of torque. A diesel rotary would surely give the best of all worlds and Mazda has been mooted to be testing them in the past.

22 February 2013

Modern diesels rev quite well, make decent power and run quite smooth... See BMW

22 February 2013

BugBear wrote:

Modern diesels rev quite well, make decent power and run quite smooth... See BMW

I most certainly wouldn't call a BMW diesel engine smooth, and they most certainly don't rev very well either.

23 February 2013

Ray60 wrote:

BugBear wrote:

Modern diesels rev quite well, make decent power and run quite smooth... See BMW

I most certainly wouldn't call a BMW diesel engine smooth, and they most certainly don't rev very well either.

You need to drive a 330d....  She purrs, she revs, she delights.... The best by far. 

22 February 2013

Bugbear - I am a "diesel head", so need no reminding of how well modern diesels perform. Mostly I like the noise they make and their performance (which is why I was careful with my words and said "have been criticsed as rough running" - I dont necessarily agree). Love em or hate em though, the fact remains they still dont rev much past 5000  (again, no problem for me, but they are frequently criticised for not revving enough) and they still dont make quite as good power figures as petrols. Hence my suggestion that a diesel rotary would be a good idea and a very interesting engine.

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