Hydrogen-powered FCX successor to go on sale in Japan and the US this Spring. It's coming to the UK later, but in limited numbers
21 March 2016

The Honda FCV Clarity will be demonstrated at the New York motor show this week, as Honda readies the production-ready fuel cell car to go on sale in Japan and the US this Spring.

The Japanese manufacturer has confirmed that sales of the hydrogen fuel cell-powered car are also planned in Europe, but sales in the UK aren't scheduled to start until the end of this year at earliest. Production numbers will also be limited here.

Read our first drive review of the Honda FCV Clarity

The successor to Honda's first Hydrogen fuel cell-powered model, the FCX Clarity, the FCV was last seen as an early-stage concept at the 2013 LA motor show. A second prototype model was then unveiled in Japan last year.

Drive for the FCV comes from an electric motor which is capable of providing more than 134bhp, while power density has been increased by 60% over that of the FCX. The fuel stack size has also been reduced by 33%. 

Honda has previously claimed the FCV is the first car of its type to feature the entire fuel cell powertrain packaged within the engine bay.

Last year the firm said the FCV will provide a driving range of 435 miles, though in its latest New York release, gives a slightly more cautious promise of a plus 300-mile range. The carmaker also says the FCV can be refuelled with hydrogen in under five minutes - previous statements pulled the estimate closer to three minutes.

In Japanese specification, the FCV is capable of supplying electricity to homes to act as an emergency generator. Japanese and US-spec FCVs will also get Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, and Honda Sensing technology, which includes auto-braking functions and lane-departure warning, as well as adaptive cruise control. We expect a similar specification to feature on UK-bound cars.

Pricing for the US market is expected to be around $60,000, which equates to about £41,700. A monthly lease price of under $500 (or £347) has also reportedly been targeted.

Honda opened its own hydrogen filling station in Swindon in 2014. The solar-powered facility is capable of producing 20 tons of hydrogen per year, and is aimed at kick-starting an infrastructure for hydrogen-powered cars in this country, as part of the government's UKH2Mobility scheme.

The FCV will face competition from the Toyota Mirai, as well as Hyundai's hydrogen-powered ix35.

Darren Moss and Sam Sheehan

Our Verdict

Honda CR-V
If the new CR-V looks more crossover than old-guard SUV it may be because the roofline is 30mm lower than before

Can the Honda CR-V bring anything new to a crowded arena?

Join the debate

Comments
17

17 November 2014

Really, make it sounds like it's soley solar-powered without the need for another power source, I'd be very surprized. Recently opened??? I thought it had been around for a while now, maybe they got their first customer turn up in sub £50,000 H car, lol.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

17 November 2014

even if Hydrogen cars become the next big thing we will still get ripped off. You need a lot of power to produce the Hydrogen and a few solar panels on the canopy won't cut it. Yet decades of under investment in our power industry is going to leave is short just for keeping the fridge lights on let alone this. The government's answer is to pay foreign countries hugely inflated prices to make power for us. Now let me work this out.. very expensive electricity will make very expensive Hydrogen... gosh that was hard!

22 March 2016
The Apprentice wrote:

even if Hydrogen cars become the next big thing we will still get ripped off. You need a lot of power to produce the Hydrogen and a few solar panels on the canopy won't cut it. Yet decades of under investment in our power industry is going to leave is short just for keeping the fridge lights on let alone this. The government's answer is to pay foreign countries hugely inflated prices to make power for us. Now let me work this out.. very expensive electricity will make very expensive Hydrogen... gosh that was hard!

In the recent round of auctions for licences to provide peak demand power generation in the UK every single licence was won by Diesel engine powered generators. Virtually all hydrogen is currently produced by steam reforming of methane gas as that is far more efficient than using electrolysis to separate water into oxygen and hydrogen.
Having a solar powered hydrogen "pump" to produce and dispense hydrogen is just pie in the sky if you want millions of hydrogen powered cars.

18 November 2014

Why are rear wheel covers frippery? Presumably they help somewhat with aerodynamics, so why not have them on the production car (easily removable for wheel changes etc)?

1 October 2015
RogerGraham wrote:

Why are rear wheel covers frippery? Presumably they help somewhat with aerodynamics, so why not have them on the production car (easily removable for wheel changes etc)?

Canot help but think this design (the production version) has more than a hint of CX about it.

18 November 2014

Despite your one-man campaign against H-power, it's happening, xxxx. The initial hydrogen filling station in Swindon has now been supplemented by a solar-powered hydrogen generation - and, yes, it is entirely feasible for H to be generated using only solar power, the most abundant, untapped source of power on the globe, even in these cloudy isles.
With more manufacturers now wading in, the technology & infrastructure investment become ever more viable.
POP goes your argument.

30 September 2015

"Despite your one-man campaign against H-power, it's happening," really, not outside of Swindon. And what with thee Focus equivant from Toyota costing £60,000 next year (noticed how it's always next year) it's not going to either. BUT the biggest question that's never ever answered by these £60,0000 H bomb car concepts is, what is the equivant mpg figure????? I tell you it's no better than a Diesel and 10 times worse than an plug-in car. Sorry but Telsa are going to put a match the Hydrogen cars.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

30 September 2015

From memory, Karl Benz used gasoline as a fuel for his very first internal combustion engine as it was a byproduct created by the oil industry as a result of the refining process. I believe, tars and paraffin was the valuable commodity of the day. Therefore it was very cheap. At that time, there most definitely was not a petrol station on every street corner, and the most people could not see that it cars could not possibly replace the horse and cart, as the infrastructure was not there. And look at us today. Hydrogen does have a future, its just not the immediate future, and may well replace methane (Natural Gas) in the home, and fuel for cars. Talking of methane, North sea gas took a decade or two to build the infrastructure in peoples homes to give us all central healing and warm homes. Its the same thing - different (explosive) gas!

21 March 2016
topsecret456987 wrote:

From memory, Karl Benz used gasoline as a fuel for his very first internal combustion engine as it was a byproduct created by the oil industry as a result of the refining process. I believe, tars and paraffin was the valuable commodity of the day. Therefore it was very cheap. At that time, there most definitely was not a petrol station on every street corner, and the most people could not see that it cars could not possibly replace the horse and cart, as the infrastructure was not there. And look at us today. Hydrogen does have a future, its just not the immediate future, and may well replace methane (Natural Gas) in the home, and fuel for cars. Talking of methane, North sea gas took a decade or two to build the infrastructure in peoples homes to give us all central healing and warm homes. Its the same thing - different (explosive) gas!

Things were very different in Benz's day, cars, of any description, were new and very expensive and there was no established refueling infrastructure. Now there are a vast number of cars, running on diesel and petrol, an extensive and very well established refueling infrastructure and cars are relatively, very compared to Benz's time, cheap to buy. You really cannot compare the situation now, with regard to hydrogen power, with the situation that existed over 100 years ago.

30 September 2015

You used to be able to buy petrol from pharmacies (i.e. getting to the point of a petrol station on every street), you'll never be buying Hydrogen from Boots. Anyhow the point is Petrol is everywhere and my house has 30 electric power points as does the office. I've answered your points can you tell me what the mpg equivant figure is for £60,000 Hydrogen cars? If indeed you live near enough to one to buy some

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • 2016 Audi A3 Sportback e-tron UK review
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    First UK drive finds the facelifted A3 Sportback e-tron remains a first-rate plug-in hybrid that is packed with tech if a little short on driver appeal
  • Citroen C11.2 Puretech 82 Furio
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    Citroën's city car gets a new sporty-looking trim level, adding visual adornments, but no premium for the 1.2-litre Puretech triple we're driving
  • Mercedes C350e Sport
    First Drive
    28 September 2016
    Petrol-electric C-Class is a surprisingly well-priced alternative to a diesel but not the greatest example of the new ‘PHEV’ breed
  • Car review
    23 September 2016
    Aston kicks off its ‘second century plan’ with an all-new turbo V12 grand tourer
  • Ford Ka+ 1.2 Ti-VCT 85
    First Drive
    22 September 2016
    A rounded, refined and well-sorted bargain supermini – once you’re used to the confusing role redefinition imposed on the once-cheeky Ka