Porsche's new 'back to basics' 911 R has emerged online prior to its official debut in Geneva this week - it will go on sale early next year
29 February 2016

The first reportedly official images of the Porsche 911 R have leaked to the internet ahead of the car's official unveiling at the Geneva motor show this week.

These images, which were first published on a Dutch news website, show that the 911 R receives a mild bodykit, although without the fixed rear wing of the more hardcore GT3 RS. White paintwork and racing stripes give the new model a racing look.

Read our full Porsche 911 R review here

Powering the 911 R is the same normally aspirated 4.0-litre flat six petrol engine with 493bhp and 384lb ft of torque used in the GT3 RS. These pictures also confirm the 911 R will be offered with a manual transmission only, instead of the PDK automatic, which has become a staple of the 911.

The 911 R is designed to pay homage to the original model of the same name, which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2017. The new 911 R will put a focus on simple driving pleasure, and has not been engineered to set competitive lap times or provide sensible daily transport. It has instead been maximised for driver interaction and feel. 

Read more Geneva motor show news

Our Verdict

New turbocharged Porsche 911 Carrera S

Can the newly turbocharged 911 shoulder Porsche’s heritage?

Join the debate

Comments
7

29 February 2016

Back to basic?,can be Driven every Day?,no wing?,fancy stripes?,will it cost less....?

Peter Cavellini.

TS7

29 February 2016

...if it hasn't sold out already (assuming it's a limited production model).

29 February 2016

Why does this leaked image show the car with 911.1 front and rear lights??

29 February 2016

The GT3 and GT3 RS that this car is based on are both 991.1 cars. This car is a 991.1 car too.

What I'm wondering is, I thought this was going to be a narrowbody back to basics car. It's a GT3 body, without the wing, with a GT3 RS motor, and a manual. Maybe there's softer suspension too?

I was expecting something without the GTS/GT3 front end bodywork.

In any case, I'm sure this car is an absolute dream to drive.

29 February 2016

and stop using the word 'leak' to describe studio photo's that have been deliberately released to the worlds press. We all know they haven't been 'leaked' out of the company headquarters by a dodgy employee with a USB stick hidden up his jacksie, so let's stop pretending shall we...?

TS7

29 February 2016

..."Leak" is the new word for "Published".

Cobnapint wrote:

and stop using the word 'leak' to describe studio photo's that have been deliberately released to the worlds press. We all know they haven't been 'leaked' out of the company headquarters by a dodgy employee with a USB stick hidden up his jacksie, so let's stop pretending shall we...?

29 February 2016

I wonder my the choice of R, it makes the R-GT3-GT3RS pecking order a little ambiguous for those not in the know. GT would have fitted nicely, unless there's a 911 RS in the works.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • 2016 Audi A3 Sportback e-tron UK review
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    First UK drive finds the facelifted A3 Sportback e-tron remains a first-rate plug-in hybrid that is packed with tech if a little short on driver appeal
  • Citroen C11.2 Puretech 82 Furio
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    Citroën's city car gets a new sporty-looking trim level, adding visual adornments, but no premium for the 1.2-litre Puretech triple we're driving
  • Mercedes C350e Sport
    First Drive
    28 September 2016
    Petrol-electric C-Class is a surprisingly well-priced alternative to a diesel but not the greatest example of the new ‘PHEV’ breed
  • Car review
    23 September 2016
    Aston kicks off its ‘second century plan’ with an all-new turbo V12 grand tourer
  • Ford Ka+ 1.2 Ti-VCT 85
    First Drive
    22 September 2016
    A rounded, refined and well-sorted bargain supermini – once you’re used to the confusing role redefinition imposed on the once-cheeky Ka