Facelifted 911 Turbo range is already on sale in the UK for a starting price of £126,925; improved 911 Turbo S gets 572bhp
12 January 2016

The facelifted Porsche 911 Turbo S will be fastest-accelerating 911 production model when it is launched in the UK at the end of this month, with a 0-62mph time of just 2.9sec – some 0.2sec faster than its predecessor.

The new 911 Turbo S is also among a select group of road going 911 models to boast a top speed in excess of 200mph, with official performance claims pointing to a potential maximum of 205mph – the same top speed achieved by the frenzied 611bhp 911 GT2 RS produced in 2010.  

Read our first drive review of the new Porsche 911 Turbo S

The new 2016 model year 911 Turbo S, which will be sold in both coupé and cabriolet body styles, retains the same twin-turbocharged 3.8-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder direct injection petrol engine as its predecessor, which first went on sale in the UK in 2013.

However, detailed changes to the inlet ports within the cylinder head, among other minor modifications to the variable vane turbocharger, have liberated an extra 20bhp, providing the new 911 Turbo S with a stout 572bhp – or more than 150bhp per litre.

No official torque figures for the new car have been revealed, although Porsche sources suggest it retains the same 553lb ft as the old 911 Turbo S owing to loading limitations with its standard seven-speed dual clutch gearbox and four-wheel-drive system.

At the same time, the standard 911 Turbo has also been updated for 2016. Also available in coupe and cabriolet forms, it receives a less aggressively tuned version of the same engine, kicking out 18bhp more than its predecessor at 532bhp.

Yet despite giving away some 40bhp to its more highly tuned sibling, it is claimed to hit 62mph from standstill in 3.0sec and run to a top speed of 199mph in coupe form, for respective improvements of 0.4sec and 3mph.

To reduce the effect of turbocharger lag and provide what Porsche describes as sharper throttle response, both the new 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo feature a so-called dynamic boost function. It maintains the boost pressure, with the throttle valve remaining open and power interrupted by cutting the fuel injection on a trailing throttle.

Porsche claims improved response when the driver reapplies the throttle, with the effected described as being more pronounced in Sport and Sport Plus modes than in Normal mode.

Along with the performance gains, Porsche claims a 2.0mpg improvement in combined cycle fuel economy across the range, with the coupe models returning 31.0mpg and the cabriolets 30.4mpg.

In line with the facelifted 911 Carrera and 911 Carrera S revealed at the Frankfurt motor show in September, the new 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S receive a series of subtle exterior styling upgrades.

Included is an altered front bumper with reshaped cooling ducts, a revised splitter element and twinned LED indicator units either side helping to emphasis the new car’s visual width.

Farther back, there are new look 20-inch centre lock wheels, those on the 911 Turbo now mirroring the size of those used by the 911 Turbo S at 9 inches in width up front and 11.5 inches at the rear. The door handles are also modified to provide them with a more integrated appearance without the plastic shell door inserts of old.

At the rear, there are newly styled tail lamps with added structure to the lenses and altered LED graphics, a redesigned engine lid featuring a new look grille for improved cooling properties as well as re-profiled bumper with new trapezoidal shaped tailpipes.      

Inside, the 2016 model year 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S receive a new 360mm-diameter steering wheel featuring a rotary driving mode controller. There’s also a new Sport Response feature that allows the driver to call up maximum accelerative potential for up to 20sec in any of the four driving modes – Normal, Sport, Sport Plus, Individual – at the press of a button.

Further changes are focused on the Porsche Communication Management infotainment system, which receives a new touchscreen and improved connectivity functions, including wi-fi. New options include a radar lane change system and a lift function that increases the ground clearance at the front spoiler lip by up to 40mm at low speeds at the press of a button.

The facelifted 911 Turbo coupé is on sale now at a price of £126,925 in the UK, with the 911 Turbo cabriolet pitched at £135,766. The 911 Turbo S starts at £145,773 for the coupe, rising to £154,614 for the cabriolet.

Read the full review of the first-ever turbocharged Porsche 911

Our Verdict

Porsche 911 Turbo
The new 911 Turbo goes head to head with the likes of the Audi R8 V10 Plus and Nissan GT-R

Is the forced-induction 911 still the supercar you can use every day?

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Comments
16

1 December 2015
Autocar wrote:

At the rear, there are newly styled tail lamps with added structure to the lenses and altered LED graphics, a redesigned engine lid featuring a new look grille for improved cooling properties as well as re-profiled bumper with new trapezoidal shaped tailpipes

What? What "structure"? Does the structure of a tail-light lens mean anything to anyone, ever? The "improved cooling" of the engine lid - is this taken on trust or should somebody actually wait and check the manufacturer's outlandish claims? This is pure churnalism. Unvarnished Ctrl+C, Crtl+V straight from the Porsche press release. Next, Steve Cropley chiming in, telling us what "wonderful chaps" Porsche are and how "just brilliant" their work is. Perhaps Autocar could give them a slew of awards, like they did earlier this year, before we learned what total and utter cheats they all are at VW. If the Emissions Scandal has exposed anything it is how utterly feckless the press were.

1 December 2015

"structure" quite probably refers to shape, the lenses not being smooth like the previous ones. improved cooling is difficult to actually check, so yes, i'd be inclined towards taking porsche's word for it. the nature of the improvement would be nice to know, however. how is it an outlandish claim? in what way is the emissions scandal the fault of the press? they have nothing to do with the testing or results. in some respects porsche are "just brilliant", they turn out sports and supercars with the reliability and build quality of bmw, and have done for decades, speaking as "a lotus guy" this has always been irritating.

1 December 2015

Lenses, pish posh. The comment isn't about Porsche. Autocar has parrotted Porsche's word without placing it under any scrutiny whatsoever. The emissions scandal - not six months ago, Autocar fawned over VW's (and Porsche's) powertrain supremo and gave him a stupid award. All highly inappropriate *even if* the man had not been - allegedly - involved in a scandal. Of course, Autocar can make mistakes. Anyone can. But it should never have been doling out gongs in the first place and has not once accepted - despite the rumbling - that this was not a very good idea.

1 December 2015

is how Porsche have gone downmarket to save a few pennies on the empty switches on the transmission tunnel. That would really irritate me if I had just blown £140K plus. The previous 997 interior was far more integrated and classic Porsche. The other thing is the lack of a manual version of course. VW are only interested in pure profit. At least pre VW days, Porsche seem to really care about the enthusiasts. Now we have bloated heavy wide cruisers. Shame. Having owned three 911's including a GT3, I can't ever see myself buying another, and as for the second hand prices of 997 GT3's, and air cooled 911's, sort of says it all about the wrong direction Porsche are going down. The appeal of 911's past was their svelte light ethos, the antithesis of Ferrari et al and the 911's 4 seat practicality.

1 December 2015

Thank goodness they did a droptop version…now most of the potential owners will be able to fit their egos in their car with themselves…

1 December 2015

Mr Smellons has a valid point. This 'article' really does read a lot like a press release.

1 December 2015

How much longer will this numbers battle be able to carry on. We have 'already' reached the point where chopping 0.2 sec off the 0-62 time makes no difference whatsoever to everyday driving capabilities or driving enjoyment.
Surely engineering limits have peaked, and it can't be long before manufacturers will be quoting improvements of 0.05 secs off 0-62 times just in the name of continuing this expensive and rather pointless war of oneupmanship.

1 December 2015
Cobnapint wrote:

How much longer will this numbers battle be able to carry on. We have 'already' reached the point where chopping 0.2 sec off the 0-62 time makes no difference whatsoever to everyday driving capabilities or driving enjoyment.
Surely engineering limits have peaked, and it can't be long before manufacturers will be quoting improvements of 0.05 secs off 0-62 times just in the name of continuing this expensive and rather pointless war of oneupmanship.

48V electrical systems, electric turbos and mild hybridisation. That's where. It will increase economy, driveablity and efficiency / emissions. It will be hell for you soon cobby... petrols cars are all heading this way.

Also there are things called track days? Where you can razz the hell out of your car and have a laugh? Some people have this hobby, where they like to go on track days and shave their lap times down, learn new driving skills etc.

1 December 2015
winniethewoo wrote:
Cobnapint wrote:

How much longer will this numbers battle be able to carry on. We have 'already' reached the point where chopping 0.2 sec off the 0-62 time makes no difference whatsoever to everyday driving capabilities or driving enjoyment.
Surely engineering limits have peaked, and it can't be long before manufacturers will be quoting improvements of 0.05 secs off 0-62 times just in the name of continuing this expensive and rather pointless war of oneupmanship.

48V electrical systems, electric turbos and mild hybridisation. That's where. It will increase economy, driveablity and efficiency / emissions. It will be hell for you soon cobby... petrols cars are all heading this way.

Also there are things called track days? Where you can razz the hell out of your car and have a laugh? Some people have this hobby, where they like to go on track days and shave their lap times down, learn new driving skills etc.

How you getting home...?

2 December 2015
Cobnapint wrote:
winniethewoo wrote:
Cobnapint wrote:

How much longer will this numbers battle be able to carry on. We have 'already' reached the point where chopping 0.2 sec off the 0-62 time makes no difference whatsoever to everyday driving capabilities or driving enjoyment.
Surely engineering limits have peaked, and it can't be long before manufacturers will be quoting improvements of 0.05 secs off 0-62 times just in the name of continuing this expensive and rather pointless war of oneupmanship.

48V electrical systems, electric turbos and mild hybridisation. That's where. It will increase economy, driveablity and efficiency / emissions. It will be hell for you soon cobby... petrols cars are all heading this way.

Also there are things called track days? Where you can razz the hell out of your car and have a laugh? Some people have this hobby, where they like to go on track days and shave their lap times down, learn new driving skills etc.

How you getting home...?

On the bus? Because you spent all your money on tyres and brakepads due to the collosal weight of the battery pack?

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