Number of advanced safety features to become compulsory in new cars sold from May 2022 onwards
James Attwood, digital editor
26 March 2019

Cars sold in the European Union from 2022 onwards will be required to be fitted with a range of new safety systems as standard, including intelligent speed limiters and monitors that can detect when a driver is drowsy or distracted.

The European Commission has approved the legislation, which was proposed last year and provisionally approved last month, in a bid to improve road safety. The legislation is due to come into effect from May 2022 for new models that haven’t been designed yet and May 2024 for new versions of models currently on the market. The measures are subject to the formal approval of the European Parliament and EU member states in September.

The legislation will make it compulsory for new cars to be fitted with intelligent speed assistance (ISA) systems, which can use GPS data and sign-recognition cameras to advise drivers of speed limits and, unless overridden, can limit the speed of the vehicle as needed, by way of reducing engine power. Cars will also need to be fitted with an alcohol interlock system, in an attempt to prevent drunk driving.

Distraction monitors will use cameras that can detect when a driver is impaired, tired or not paying attention, and then prompt them to react. Volvo recently announced that it would fit such systems on its vehicles as standard.

The safety features that will become mandatory in passenger cars are:

- Advanced automatic emergency braking systems

- Lane departure warning systems

- Intelligent speed assistance

- Alcohol interlock installation facilitation

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- Driver drowsiness and attention warning

- Advanced driver distraction warning

- Emergency stop signal

- Reversing cameras or detectors

- Accident data recorder

Several of the systems, including AEB, are already widely available and standard on many models, in part because they are now required for a car to score the maximum five stars in the Euro NCAP safety tests.

The European Commission estimates that the measures will save more than 25,000 lives by 2038. Under the new rules, manufacturers will have to ensure the systems are developed in a way that ensures users accept them.

Antonio Avenoso, executive director of the European Transport Safety Council, said: “There have only been a handful of moments in the last 50 years which could be described as big leaps forward for road safety in Europe.

“The mandatory introduction of the seatbelt was one, and the first EU minimum crash safety standards, agreed in 1998, was another. If this agreement is given the formal green light, it will represent another of those moments.”

If approved, the new legislation will apply to all new cars sold within the EU. While Britain’s planned departure from the EU means those laws won’t apply here, the UK government has hinted that it will keep vehicle safety standards closely aligned with Europe. The complexity of car production means that such systems would likely be fitted to UK models produced for the wider European market in any instance.

Speaking when the proposed legislation was first accepted in February, Matthew Avery, director of research at Thatcham Research, said it was “great news for road safety”.

He added: “It’s encouraging that a lot of the safety technologies proposed are already fitted as standard on many new cars. In fact, it’s not now impossible to get a five-star Euro NCAP safety rating without AEB fitted as standard.

“We would hope the proposed timeline of within three years could be more ambitious.”

Avery also cited the value of intelligent speed assistance systems but added that he feels it’s important the EU has ruled such systems must be overridable, saying: “Drivers like the vehicle to know what the set limit is but also like to have ultimate control of their vehicle’s speed.”

Avery said it’s “vital” that the standards are recognised in the UK post-Brexit, “unless the UK would be happy to accept lower safety standards than were in operation across the EU”.

Read more

European Union lifts safety measures mandate for 2021

Euro NCAP on the future of road safety

Volvo to fit driver monitoring systems as standards from early 2020s

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Comments
61

21 February 2019

Go down well in Porsche 911.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

21 February 2019

Place your bets, then!  It uses sensors.  How long before the first one slams the brakes on because the sensor has gone faulty...and gets the car rear-ended?

26 March 2019
Bazzer wrote:

Place your bets, then!  It uses sensors.  How long before the first one slams the brakes on because the sensor has gone faulty...and gets the car rear-ended?

This is a relatively simple problem to solve, you have multiple sensors and you only take action if the sensors agree. If one sensor fails then there will be different values from the sensors and the car can throw up a fault light on the dashboard and disable the related functionality.

This is how electronic throttles work (2 sensors), and many sensors in aircraft (But appears not in the case of AoA sensors on a certain brand of aircraft currently in the news).

27 March 2019

Because that worked so well on the Boeing 737 Max-8! It seems to be emerging that sensors were at fault.

And what will be the point of buying a car that does more than 70mph any longer, which is no doubt the real intention of the European Commission. Tiny engines in everything and emission reduction.

And even in your 911 GT2 RS, you will not be able to overtake Doris who does 15 mph around the corners, where you cannot overtake, but then speeds back up to 30 mph on the straights where you can. And horror of horrors, just like with trucks, there will be a speed limiter race. Your GT2 cuts out at 30mph precisely, being a Porsche. Her Honda Jazz is not so accurate, and allows 30.2 mph, so you cannot overtake her.

Will 2021 be the year everyone buys a performance car, or will the internet and the back of EVO be full of adverts for people who can turn off the limiter in the ECU?

26 March 2019
Bazzer wrote:

Place your bets, then!  It uses sensors.  How long before the first one slams the brakes on because the sensor has gone faulty...and gets the car rear-ended?

...but the fault would lie with the rear-ender, not the rear-endee.

27 March 2019
Bazzer wrote:

Place your bets, then!  It uses sensors.  How long before the first one slams the brakes on because the sensor has gone faulty...and gets the car rear-ended?

 

I thought they had already decided not to implement auto slowing 9which could be dangerous if you can't override it) but to just have a warning for the driver. What might work better is a warning to other drivers, the police and the world in general, like sounding the horn. That would put pressure on drivers more than a beep inside the car. All in all though, I think this is a good idea. Except that the real problem idiots will still be able to drive like idiots in their older cars for perhaps many years to come. Maybe the limiters could be retrofitted...

21 February 2019

In addition to what Bazzer said, I completely believe that manufacturers put all this complex technology into cars thinking "it only has to work a few years until the warranty expires....who cares what happens after that as we'll still get lots of money from parts". Ridiculous politicians with their very simple view of the world don't help either.

Also, aside from those systems actually going wrong, even when they are 'working' they are not working correctly - there's a lot of reports of automatic braking systems slamming the brakes on when passing parked cars!

At the end of the day, I earned the right to drive a car by making sure I was competent enough to pass the driving test and fully understand my responsibilities as a safe road user. If the car has to brake for me, I'm either driving without due care and attention (a criminal offence) or not driving at a speed that matches the conditions / situation, i.e. I shouldn't be driving in the first place.

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

26 March 2019
gavsmit wrote:

In addition to what Bazzer said, I completely believe that manufacturers put all this complex technology into cars thinking "it only has to work a few years until the warranty expires....who cares what happens after that as we'll still get lots of money from parts". Ridiculous politicians with their very simple view of the world don't help either.

Also, aside from those systems actually going wrong, even when they are 'working' they are not working correctly - there's a lot of reports of automatic braking systems slamming the brakes on when passing parked cars!

At the end of the day, I earned the right to drive a car by making sure I was competent enough to pass the driving test and fully understand my responsibilities as a safe road user. If the car has to brake for me, I'm either driving without due care and attention (a criminal offence) or not driving at a speed that matches the conditions / situation, i.e. I shouldn't be driving in the first place.

You make it sound like car makers do the minimum, like they don’t care if people are injured or killed as long as they get the sale, these new aids will help, and as someone else said these aids are built with a backup or default so they still work, and ultimately it’s down to us, maybe it’s an age thing?, but I like the idea that I’ve got someone , some thing watching my back, Car makers aren’t ripping you off, there’s Laws to prevent this, Cars aren’t 100% reliable, yes, there are some lemons produced, it’s unlucky if you buy one new, but at least you have a warranty, second hand?, well, that’s down to you.

Peter Cavellini.

26 March 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

gavsmit wrote:

In addition to what Bazzer said, I completely believe that manufacturers put all this complex technology into cars thinking "it only has to work a few years until the warranty expires....who cares what happens after that as we'll still get lots of money from parts". Ridiculous politicians with their very simple view of the world don't help either.

Also, aside from those systems actually going wrong, even when they are 'working' they are not working correctly - there's a lot of reports of automatic braking systems slamming the brakes on when passing parked cars!

At the end of the day, I earned the right to drive a car by making sure I was competent enough to pass the driving test and fully understand my responsibilities as a safe road user. If the car has to brake for me, I'm either driving without due care and attention (a criminal offence) or not driving at a speed that matches the conditions / situation, i.e. I shouldn't be driving in the first place.

You make it sound like car makers do the minimum, like they don’t care if people are injured or killed as long as they get the sale, these new aids will help, and as someone else said these aids are built with a backup or default so they still work, and ultimately it’s down to us, maybe it’s an age thing?, but I like the idea that I’ve got someone , some thing watching my back, Car makers aren’t ripping you off, there’s Laws to prevent this, Cars aren’t 100% reliable, yes, there are some lemons produced, it’s unlucky if you buy one new, but at least you have a warranty, second hand?, well, that’s down to you.

Most interesting article on last weeks Top Gear show was the testing of a new £30k+ Passats pedestian Auto-Stop system.  3 tests and 3 fails, 100%!   Yep it really is down to you.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

21 February 2019

I heartily agree with Bazzer and Gavsmit - my heart sinks every time I hear of more electronics being foisted upon us.  Having had to use PCs all my working life leaves me highly suspicious of anything containing micro processors which always seem to do strange unexpected things or lock up altogether.  Autocar have already reported two cars on long term test (both Audis I think)  which have applied the brakes inadvertently.  I'm also fed up with NCAP continually moving the goal posts and reducing a car's safety rating halfway through its life because it has "fallen behind" with all these devices.  Comparability between cars has gone out the window.

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