From £29,375
Mid-range XF seamlessly blends refinement, performance and comfort

Our Verdict

Jaguar XF 2008-2015
The Jaguar XF is a sublime British executive saloon. It has a tremendous interior and even greater dynamics

The Jaguar XF is a sublime British executive saloon. It has a tremendous interior and even greater dynamics

What is it?

Jaguar’s answer to the BMW 530d. The recently revised Jaguar XF range has now arrived on UK roads, and it’s the mid-range diesel we’re testing here.

The 3.0D V6 model used to be the entry-level XF model, but the addition of the 2.2D has pushed it higher up the range. The biggest change from the pre-facelift car is the addition of a ZF eight-speed automatic gearbox, which promises smoother, faster and more seamless shifts over the six-speeder from before.

The handsome styling changes include slimmed down headlights, a lower bonnet line and two striking sets of LED strips sitting either side of the larger front grille.

Asides from the gearbox, dynamic changes are small yet significant, and include dynamic engine mounts, an increased use of sound deadening materials and redesigned wing mirrors, all designed bolster refinement and suppress road noise.

What’s it like?

A remarkably accomplished machine. What strikes you first is just how silky smooth the powertrain is, the 237bhp, 369lb ft V6 turbodiesel oozing refinement and being capable of eating up motorway miles without any fuss. Drive this XF back-to-back with the new 2.2-litre four-cylinder model and you’ll really appreciate how much greater the refinement is – and how much quieter it operates – at lower speeds.

The gearbox is also a fine addition to the package. Having eight forward speeds raises fears over hesitancy and the potential for blunting progress, but it responds well to differing driving styles: really put your foot down and it’ll hold the gear for more rapid acceleration; drive with more consideration and it’ll seamlessly shift in the background.

Off the motorway, it lacks the impressive urgency of the more driver-focused S model, but it’s still remarkably composed and quick enough in almost any given situation.

The steering is accurate and the ride quality is also particularly pleasing, although we’d stick with the standard 18-inch wheels of this Premium Luxury model over the optional 19- or 20-inchers as the latter options tend to detract from ride comfort over more abrasive surfaces around town.

Should I buy one?

It’s hard to think of too many reasons not to. Each of the three diesel models in the XF range offers something distinctly different, but each of them is so well executed.

If you can live without the added power and sharpened chassis of the non S 3.0 V6D but still want the extra refinement of a six-cylinder engine, then you won’t have too many regrets while eating up the motorway miles in this XF.

Jaguar XF 3.0D V6 Premium Luxury

Price: £40,950; Top speed: 149mph (limited); 0-60mph: 6.7sec; Economy: 44.8mpg; CO2: 169g/km; Kerb weight: 1810kg; Engine: V6, 2993cc, turbodiesel; Power: 237bhp at 4000rpm; Torque: 369lb ft at 2000rpm; Gearbox: 8-spd automatic

Join the debate

Comments
27

5 August 2011

Why has it arrived on UK shores? It was built in the Midlands.

Sloppy journalism aside, which offers better value - this, or an upper level Evoque? I know that I would much prefer the Jaguar.

5 August 2011

Yes - the journalism is sloppy to the extent of being unforgivable. Thankfully, the car being reviewed is much better than the journalism! E

5 August 2011

A lovely car but I do think JLR need to watch their pricing as their products are getting pricier than the competition now and they always used to be good and competitively priced . Lets hope higher pricing will not mean lower sales .

5 August 2011

I just skimmed the UK website of JLR. The XFR is the only petrol option. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.

5 August 2011

[quote Amanitin]

I just skimmed the UK website of JLR. The XFR is the only petrol option. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.

[/quote]

The Autocar page with this report has 4 other petrol XF's at between £50,000 and £65,000.

5 August 2011

[quote Amanitin]XFR is the only petrol option[/quote]

I understand from my local dealer that you can still order a 5.0 petrol NA engine if you ask them nicely enough. Prices are roughly equivalent to the diesel S version; however having driven both (albeit the pre-facelift model) I'd wonder why you'd want to...

5 August 2011

[quote Old Toad]A lovely car but I do think JLR need to watch their pricing as their products are getting pricier than the competition now and they always used to be good and competitively priced . Lets hope higher pricing will not mean lower sales [/quote]

You're absolutely right Old Toad. Jaguars have always been priced competitively but recently, this has not always been the case. If my memory serves me well, the XJ Supersport with all the bells and whistles, is approaching £90,000

Would not stop me buying one though if I had the means

5 August 2011

[quote newtoybox][quote Amanitin]

I just skimmed the UK website of JLR. The XFR is the only petrol option. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.

[/quote]

The Autocar page with this report has 4 other petrol XF's at between £50,000 and £65,000.

[/quote] the guy appears to be correct - absolutely no petrol options on offer other than the XFR.

5 August 2011

[quote speckyclay]I understand from my local dealer that you can still order a 5.0 petrol NA engine if you ask them nicely enough. Prices are roughly equivalent to the diesel S version; however having driven both (albeit the pre-facelift model) I'd wonder why you'd want to...[/quote]

Yes, you can still order a 'new' XF 5.0 but it will be from stock. My local garage, Minster Jaguar Leeds, has a delivery miles 11-plate XF 5.0 Premium Luxury S for £34,995...


5 August 2011

[quote Mark Tisshaw]We've only driven the revised XF and XK range in left-hand drive form on Portuguese roads, hence the UK drive angle. [/quote] wasn't last months test of the 2.2D in a UK registered right hand drive model?

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