One-off BMW M5 has around 580bhp and 400lb ft of torque

BMW’s M division has built a special lightweight one-off version of the E60 M5 as part of the 25th anniversary celebrations for the iconic four door saloon.

Revealed this morning at BMW’s prototype workshop at the Nurburgring in Germany, the celebratory M5 is described by M division’s head of development, Albert Biermann, as “the M5 CSL we never built”.

See the history of the BMW M5 in hi-res pics

Hi-res pictures of the BMW M5 special edition

Among the changes brought to the new car is a heavily modified version of the standard M5’s 5.0-litre V10 engine. The highly strung, 90-degree unit has been enlarged with a longer stroke taking its capacity up to 5.5-litres, making it the largest engine to ever feature in an official M-car.

Also included as part of the engine overhaul is a carbonfibre manifold boasting a increased capacity air box and a secondary oil cooler – the latter requiring modifications to the front bumper, which gains an additional air duct in the place usually dedicated to the license plate.

Official power and torque figures have not been released but Biermann hints the output peaks at “around 580bhp and close to 400lb ft”. That’s up from 507bhp and 384lb ft with the standard M5.

Channelling the added reserves back to the rear wheels is a beefed up version of the M3’s seven-speed double clutch gearbox. The Getrag engineered unit, operated via steering wheel mounted paddles or push/pull gear lever, supplants the standard M5’s sequential seven speed manual unit, offering smoother and more rapid gear shifts.

Further changes centre around the body, which receives a carbonfibre roof as part of a weight saving program that has pared a claimed 50kg from the standard M5’s 1830kg kerb weight.

BMW’s M division has also stripped down the interior, doing away with the standard front seats in favour of two carbon fibre backed pews, while the rear seat has been ditched altogether.

In terms of its suspension the new M5 remains close to the standard specification. “We’ve altered the mapping of the variable dampers but the geometry remains the same,” says Biermann.

No performance claims have been made for the powered-up-and-pared-down M5, but Biermann says it is “comfortably faster the standard M5’s 4.1sec 0-100km/h”.

He also confirmed to Autocar that the new one-off M5 it has already lapped the Nurburgring in the hands of long-time BMW race driver, Claudia Huertgen, in under eight minutes, making it some 20sec faster around the legendary German circuit than the standard M5.

“It’s a lot gutsier than the standard M5,” says Huertgen, who this year drove the new Alpina M6 GT3 race car in the FIA sportscar championship. “You can sense the added drive out of corners. There’s more bottom end shove. I’m pulling over 180mph under the bridge at the Doettinger Hohe [teh fastest point of the track]."

Yet despite the investment that has gone into creating the new uber-M5, Biermann says it is destined to remain a one-off.

“Right now we’re concentrating on the next-generation M5. This car has been fun to develop but there are no plans for production,” he says.

Greg Kable

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Comments
17

28 October 2009

50kg weight saving? That's barely a CSL... though the power sounds immense! I would love to see an M3 CSL again with at least 150kg stripped out of it.

28 October 2009

I like it!, but there should never be an M5 CSL, why?, well there's never been one for starters, there's the possibilty of an M3 CSL which would invade said territory, and thirdly, why not just stick this engine in the current M5?, nobody wants a stripped M5 anyway, the cars a wild child also, no, no M5 CSL, give us an M3 CSL,Mmmm, i'm salivating already!

Peter Cavellini.

28 October 2009

Given that they've stripped out the reat seats anyway, wouldn't it have made more sense to start with an M3 Coupé?

28 October 2009

[quote Peter Cavellini]nobody wants a stripped M5 anyway[/quote]

I'd quite like one. There would be a market for it, if not somewhat limited. There is something special about big saloons set up in an uncompromised fashion. This is why the HSV specials that we don't see in the UK do so well in Australia.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

28 October 2009

[quote TegTypeR]I'd quite like one. There would be a market for it, if not somewhat limited. [/quote]

But an M5 with no rear seats? It does seem somewhat pointless to have a great big saloon with a gaping hole where the rear seats used to be. They should take another leaf from HSV's big book of badass and build an M5 ute!

28 October 2009

"Official power and torque figures have not been released but Biermann hints the output peaks at “around 580bhp and close to 400lb ft”. That’s up from 407bhp and 348lb ft with the standard M5."

I thought if you hit the M button you had 500bhp so that only an 80 bhp increase. No doubt there people out there if this is wrong.

How about an M3CSL with this revised V10 rather than the V8?

28 October 2009

[quote disco.stu]But an M5 with no rear seats? It does seem somewhat pointless to have a great big saloon with a gaping hole where the rear seats used to be. [/quote]

M6 CSL anybody... I wouldn't mind one.

28 October 2009

407bhp and 348lbft should be 507bhp and 384lbft.

0-100km/h is not 4.1secs as standard but 4.7 secs

29 October 2009

It would probably be first ever 4dr saloon with no rear seats

29 October 2009

20 seconds faster round the ring than a standard M5?, they could have gone 30 seconds quicker if they'd given it to Sabine!

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