Mark Tisshaw
28 May 2012

What is it?

Only the cheapest hybrid car you can currently buy. At £14,995, the new Toyota Yaris Hybrid is more than £1000 cheaper than the previous holder of that crown, the £16,300 – and less sophisticated – Honda Jazz Hybrid.

The Yaris also boasts the lowest CO2 rating of any new car on sale that isn't an electric car or extended-range electric car. Its 79g/km puts it 5g/km below the recently revised Hyundai i20 in that department.

As well as appealing to the head, Toyota also hopes the Yaris will appeal to the heart in the way no Toyota hybrid – or third-generation Yaris, even – has managed. For starters, it looks a darned sight better than the standard Yaris on which it's based, with a much bolder front-end look.

Toyota also promises "more natural acceleration feel" thanks to its retuned CVT gearbox, something that has blighted the performance potential of Toyota's previous hybrid efforts.

What is it like?

Anyone who has ever driven a Prius or an Auris Hybrid will feel instantly at home in the Yaris Hybrid. The Yaris is a class smaller than those, but the Toyota hybrid hallmarks carry over. So look closely on the outside and you'll spot the blue Toyota badging and the 'Hybrid Synergy Drive' logos. Inside, there is the EV mode button, and on the go there's myriad whirring noises as the petrol-electric drivetrain does its efficient work.

The Yaris uses a 1.5-litre petrol engine based on the second-generation Prius's instead of the 1.8 found in the latest Prius and Auris fuel-sippers. The hybrid system – electric motor, transaxle, inverter and batteries – has been downsized from the larger models to fit into the Yaris without compromising on its spacious interior or 286-litre boot.

The hybrid system offers three different driving modes: Normal, Eco and EV. EV allows the Yaris to run on electric power only for short bursts (something the Jazz Hybrid can't manage). This mode is good while it lasts; the Yaris is silent apart from a slight whirr from the electric motor, but inject anything more than a big toe's worth of pressure on the throttle and the engine kicks back in.

Trying Eco mode once is enough; it saps power too much and makes acceleration either a painfully slow or painfully noisy experience (usually both), as the hybrid system doesn't like to be revved.

So it's best to leave the Yaris Hybrid in Normal mode, which is where its best work is done. Drive at a steady pace and the Yaris Hybrid delivers a decent amount of performance, and it also has a surprisingly good turn of speed off the line. But all this is undermined by the CVT gearbox; you're not likely to be able to enjoy a burst of acceleration as there's a constant drone from the transmission.

And whereas the Prius's hybrid system almost effortlessly and silently blends all the components that go into the hybrid drivetrain (save for the CVT), in the Yaris Hybrid you're continually made audibly aware that under the bonnet is not your average small turbodiesel engine.

The Yaris Hybrid is therefore a car to which you need to adapt your driving style in order to get the best out of it. Gentle throttle inputs are the best way to enjoy driving it, something you'll be rewarded for at the pumps. It's also fun to watch the graphics on the interior screen plotting how efficiently you're driving and whether it's the engine or electric motor/battery pack sending power to the front wheels. And in urban driving conditions you're likely to spend at least 40 per cent of the time driving on electric power only; as usual, it's a case of leaving it in Normal mode and letting the clever electronics decide when to run on all-electric power, rather than sticking it in EV mode yourself.

As for the all-important economy figure, a three-hour test route that took in a decent range of everyday driving conditions returned a figure of 65mpg, versus the official claimed figure of 76.3mpg for the T Spirit we tested (the base T3 and T4 models boast an even more impressive 80.7mpg). It was a highly commendable performance, but it's worth noting that the flat roads around Amsterdam didn't allow for a test replicating the UK's naturally hilly road conditions to be factored into the overall figure.

The Yaris Hybrid rides, handles and steers in much the same way as its conventionally powered siblings, even given its extra weight, 20mm increase in length and the 16in alloys of our T Spirit test car. The mature ride quality is a particular highlight that, coupled with steering that is light but not completely devoid of feel, makes the Yaris Hybrid a fine performer around its natural habitat of town centres. 

Should I buy one?

Clearly, the Yaris Hybrid is aimed at a very particular type of buyer, one who cares more about economy, comfort and space than performance and driver involvement. And Toyota has absolutely nailed the Yaris Hybrid for the type of buyer who's going to buy it, a type that's on the rise in these increasingly eco-conscious times.

It looks funky enough on the outside, if a little dowdy inside (but the amount of space helps compensate for this). It also rides nicely and is comfortable and well equipped.

Crucially, the fuel economy is impressive, as is a sticker price that is not only lower than the Jazz Hybrid's but also undercuts super-frugal turbodiesel economy specials including the Ford Fiesta Econetic and Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion.

But would you, the enthusiast, go for the Yaris Hybrid over its more zesty peers? Like the Prius and Auris Hybrid before it, the Yaris Hybrid will certainly appeal to the head, but the heart may not thank you for buying one.

Toyota Yaris Hybrid 

Price: from £14,995; 0-62mph: 11.8sec; Top speed: 103mph; Economy: 80.7mpg (T Spirit 76.3mpg); CO2: 79g/km (T Spirit 85g/km); Kerb weight: 1085kg; Engine: 4 cyls, 1497cc, petrol, plus electric motor; Combined power: 98bhp: Torque: 82lb ft (petrol engine), 125 lb ft (electric motor); Gearbox: CVT

Join the debate

Comments
23

Have a word will you, "shame

2 years 11 weeks ago

Have a word will you, "shame the fun factor is missing", its a Toyota Yaris Hybrid, Toyota, Yaris and fun dont appear together, what does, is well built, reliable, and dependable. Not every one wants sports suspension and big alloys.  

I cant remember the last enthusiast I saw in a Yaris, if any car that you have tested recently deserves 5 stars this it, this is a game changer, it puts serious and proven technology within the reach of the average buyer, forget your Vauxhall Ampera at £38k, this is what should have taken the crown as car of the year, I think a few manufacturers will be reviewing their price lists, a Toyota Hybrid or a diesel Fiesta, there is only one sane choice, oh and no DPF problems.

 

plug in?

2 years 11 weeks ago

No plug in option?

and why instead of cutting down the 1.8 petrol to a 1.5 litre didn't they just use an even smaller engine with a turbo for much better CO2?

Citytiger wrote: I cant

2 years 11 weeks ago

Citytiger wrote:

I cant remember the last enthusiast I saw in a Yaris, if any car that you have tested recently deserves 5 stars this it, this is a game changer, it puts serious and proven technology within the reach of the average buyer, forget your Vauxhall Ampera at £38k, this is what should have taken the crown as car of the year, I think a few manufacturers will be reviewing their price lists, a Toyota Hybrid or a diesel Fiesta, there is only one sane choice, oh and no DPF problems.

 

+1..totally agree. The incredibly impressive figures and price are undermined by the throwaway comment about fun-to-drive. If you want that, get a Fiesta or a Panda..but then neither of them come close to offering the economy/value ration this does. Respect where it's due.

Come on autocar - thats an

2 years 11 weeks ago

Come on autocar - thats an unfair statement about "shame no fun factor". Folk who buy this car are not the boyo's tramping the right foot at the lights are tearing up the Welsh countryside roads to see if they can scratch the door handles. No this is a seriously decent car - best in class - and being offered with sufficient goodies to make it a pleasant mode of transport at a price which folk can afford

what's life without imagination

15 grand is very expensive

2 years 11 weeks ago

15 grand is very expensive for a Toyota Yaris ( even if it is a Hybrid ). It would take years to claw back the savings in economy. I would expect a Yaris to be closer to £10k. Is it worth it ? 

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

Doesn't add up

2 years 11 weeks ago

Autocar:  "EV allows the Yaris Hybrid to run on electric power only for short bursts ... but inject anything more than a big toe's worth of pressure on the throttle and the engine kicks back in.

"Trying Eco mode once is enough; it saps power too much and makes acceleration either a painfully slow or painfully noisy experience (usually both), as the hybrid system doesn't like to be revved.

"So, best leave the Yaris Hybrid in normal mode, which is where its best work is done."

Which implies that in the real world it will either be slower or thirstier than the stated figures (and probably both).  Yes, you'll avoid the congestion charge if you regularly drive into central London, but in every other way the similarly-priced 1.4 diesel will leave it for dead, and probably be more economical to boot.  If you want to go slowly, but the £9,995 base model and the extra £5K will buy you enough extra fuel to last well beyond when you've sold the car.

They might be getting close, but they are yet to reach the tipping point of a hybrid being a better bet than a diesel for most people.  It's hardly a game changer as suggested by someone above.

I don't get those posters who

2 years 11 weeks ago

I don't get those posters who criticise Autocar for saying its no fun to drive.  This is an enthusiasts' car mag, so let Autocar judge it according to enthusiast criteria.

After all, not everyone visiting the website will know that other Yaris's are a bland drive.  Someone in the market for a new hybrid car may stumble across this site and want to know how much fun it is.

And for goodness sake, why can't Toyota make a car more fun to drive?  Its not like they do't have the know-how or are going to alienate the customers who don't need fun.


Johnny English wrote: I

2 years 11 weeks ago

Johnny English wrote:

I don't get those posters who criticise Autocar for saying its no fun to drive.  This is an enthusiasts' car mag, so let Autocar judge it according to enthusiast criteria.

Really? Doesn't quite stack up when dullards like the VW Golf and the Skoda Superb are hugely praised in Autocar tests...the most un-interesting cars i've ever driven.

It makes no sence!

2 years 11 weeks ago

A deisel škoda will beat it by 3 MPG and the kia 8 MPG!  And if you really want a toyota the normal yaris with alloys, satnav, bluetooth and a reversing camera costs £3k less, you could spend that on more than just fuel!

I've never driven one, but

2 years 11 weeks ago

I've never driven one, but wasn't the first Yaris supposed to be a lot of fun? If that is the case, why can't they replicate it in this gen?

It is amazing how a few styling tweaks make it a lot neater. It is still far from the best looking small hatch (fiesta for me, followed by the Rio & 208) but it is an improvement over the standard look. Interior still looks bad though

-----

10 years of Smart ownership over, sensible car mode activated

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