From £17,075
Diesel-powered Superb estate is the pick of the range

Our Verdict

Skoda Superb 2008-2015
Does German quality and Czech pricing equal a great deal?

The Skoda Superb offers German quality and Czech pricing, but does that add up to a great deal?

What is it?

When you see a Skoda Superb estate, it’s likely to be this one: the 2.0-litre TDI 170. Most Superb saloons so far have been bought with this engine and Skoda sees no reason why this will change.

Incidentally, the Czech firm originally penciled in the 138bhp version of the same engine, with mid-range SE spec, to be the top seller, but it is the punchier unit with the highest Elegance trim level that people are snapping up. This is perhaps telling of where Skoda is heading; no longer just a means of basic, simple transport.

The Superb estate is enormous, and easily eclipses established large load-luggers from Ford, Vauxhall and Volvo. Seats down, the luggage bay is 1865 litres, beating the 1733 of the Ford Mondeo, its nearest competition.

Rear chairs in place, 633 litres compares to the Ford’s 542-litre capacity. With that boot fully loaded the 258lb ft of the 168bhp oil burner will come in useful, and could be money well spent considering it is less than £1000 more than the 138bhp TDI 140 version.

What’s it like?

It’s easy to see why this would be the most popular model. There is ample poke from the 2.0-litre 4-pot, and the chunky torque between 1750 and 2500rpm negates the need to use the six-speed manual too often. Add to this a thrifty 47.9mpg on the combined cycle and Co2 emissions of 155g/km, both of which are better than the TDI 140.

See the hi-res pics

The Superb estate is a handsome car, especially from the back, and the styling is far more resolved than on its saloon cousin. The curved rear has an element of Audi to it, but at the same time making the A6 Avant look a tad old fashioned.

Folding the rear seats is easy, and once they have folded (almost) flat there is a large strap on all but the basic model that holds everything in place. A side compartment on the left is good for concealing valuables and a double-level floor is available as an option.

Cabin space is huge for any class of car, especially in the rear, and Skoda says of all the VW products only a long wheelbase A8 has more legroom. The interior quality is first rate too - a match for anything in the VW range, and a cut above what most rivals offer.

Superb is ultra-refined for a car in this class, with the diesel engine only becoming evident under acceleration. It is worth noting too, that the diesel rides a little better than the 1.4-litre possibly because it is slightly heavier, pushing it down more on its revised springs. The handling is not as sharp as a Mondeo’s but the Superb estate is safe and composed, and feels a lot smaller than it actually is.

Should I buy one?

Definitely. The Superb is a quality estate for a bargain price, and this 2.0-litre 170 is easily the pick of the bunch.

Ollie Stallwood

Join the debate

Comments
12

19 October 2009

Er how can this car be great value for money when the prices are still tba? Or is it just such a good car that one should pay millions for it? The last time Autocar said a car was so well priced was on the Skoda Yeti first drive. They then rubbished the car as being overpriced when they finally found out what the prices were for the road test. I do hope that history isn't about to repeat itself...

19 October 2009

[quote Autocar]Incidentally, the Czech firm originally penciled in the 138bhp version of the same engine, with mid-range SE spec, to be the top seller, but it is the punchier unit with the highest Elegance trim level that people are snapping up.[/quote]

Perhaps this is surprising at first, but it seems to be representative of a wider change in the type of cars people are buying. Most of the new Mondeos seem to be in Titanium X trim, loads of the Mazda 6's are big wheeled high spec versions and I don't think I've seen a base spec C5 yet.

The fact so many Superbs are in top spec trim can only reflect well on Skoda.

19 October 2009

Hi. The estate versions will be around £1100 to £1300 more than the saloon version, so expect this to be just over £21,000 in SE trim.

19 October 2009

[quote Ollie Stallwood]Hi. The estate versions will be around £1100 to £1300 more than the saloon version, so expect this to be just over £21,000 in SE trim.[/quote]

- amazing value.

How about a torquey, 170hp, 4WD, good looking, capacious estate at £23k? Bargain of the year.

19 October 2009

On the face of it, this Skoda should render the A6 Avant obsolete, as there isn't really much left to the ageing Audi. But I don't think it will happen - the Superb probably won't steal sales from A6, because people in Britain are so brand-conscious, that there won't be many of them hesitating between these two cars.

19 October 2009

This could well be my next car.

19 October 2009

JackB wrote the following post at Mon, Oct 19 2009 5:40 PM:

On the face of it, this Skoda should render the A6 Avant obsolete, as there isn't really much left to the ageing Audi. But I don't think it will happen - the Superb probably won't steal sales from A6, because people in Britain are so brand-conscious, that there won't be many of them hesitating between these two cars.

Exactly right. For many doing searches on their company car websites, they will never even tick the Skoda box out of principle so will not even register this cars existence.

(Can you imagine the uphill battle the Koreans have then?)

20 October 2009

my god ! Skoda have pulled a rabbit out of hat with this new estate version, looks good, decent power, lots of kit, affordableish ( 21k is not cheap btw) but still offers more space then much bigger cars. Looks a lot better then the plastic ford mondeo estate !!!!

this is the third time this week I have praised Skoda i must be dreaming

21 October 2009

Yes, but what about an auto gearbox, multitronic (or DSG) ? Can't compete with diesel Audi, Phaeton, Merc etc without one.

21 October 2009

flangenuts wrote the following post at Oct 20, 2009 11:05 PM:

Yes, but what about an auto gearbox, multitronic (or DSG) ? Can't compete with diesel Audi, Phaeton, Merc etc without one.

As a 2006 A6 3.0tdi avant driver I concur exactly.

I have no qualms whatsoever about driving a Skoda but I want a diesel auto 4wd (that doesnt lose £38k in value over 38 months and 65000 miles despite clean condition and total Audi service history)

Get the options right and Skoda have a winner

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