From £17,075
Greenline requires little compromise for such low running costs

Our Verdict

Skoda Superb 2008-2015
Does German quality and Czech pricing equal a great deal?

The Skoda Superb offers German quality and Czech pricing, but does that add up to a great deal?

14 February 2011

What is it?

It would be easy to consider the sheer size of the 4.8-metre long Skoda Superb estate, match it to thoughts of a 104bhp turbodiesel engine and assume that the performance compromise would be too great regardless of economy.

Not so. As it turns out this Skoda Superb estate Greenline II, which actually weighs a respectable 1471kg despite its size and now gets the 1.6-litre common rail diesel and five-speed manual, is arguably one of the most relevant real-world cars on sale.

See the test pics of the Skoda Superb estate Greenline

What’s it like?

Performance is a little on the tardy side. Set off in the Greenline Superb and until the turbo kicks in fully it’s evident that this is a low-powered engine towing a big car. It’s the same story if you pull out into the fast lane expecting a quick response to a stamped throttle. It will pull, but rather lazily, so you have to think ahead.

Despite this, the Superb is not an unpleasant car to drive. Keep the engine in its comfort zone, enjoy the solid gearshift and well-judged steering and it flows along nicely and with a decent enough level of performance for normal motoring.

The cabin is refined and comfortable and despite the body being lowered by 15mm to improve aerodynamics, the suspension does a good job of soaking up the flaws in the road surface, while keeping body movement under control.

There is no denying that the 138bhp and 168bhp 2.0-litre turbodiesels make for better driver’s cars than the Greenline. But the merits of a car that has limousine levels of passenger space, well-finished cabin, an enormous boot and yet will cost £30 to tax for the year, has a claimed combined economy of 64.2mpg (low 50s are more likely going by the results of our varied test route), and emits just 114g/km are very clear. Company car users will be even more tempted with benefit in kind at just £52 per month.

Should I buy one?

Most buyers will opt for the more flexible 138bhp diesel, and so should you if you regularly carry a full complement of people and luggage. But if you have less taxing motoring in mind and you just want a big, relaxing and enjoyable but affordable way to travel, this is a great option.

It feels a class above most of the cars you can get at this price in terms of size, and more importantly it doesn’t feel like you’re making any significant sacrifices for its frugal ways. It’s an excellent way to travel - the running costs are just a bonus.

Skoda Superb Estate Greenline II Elegance

Price: £24,040; Top speed: 119mph; 0-62mph: 12.6sec; Economy: 64.2mpg; CO2: 114g/km; Kerb weight: 1471kg; Engine type: 4cyls,1598cc, turbodiesel; Power: 104bhp at 4400rpm; Torque: 184lb ft at 1500-2500rpm; Gearbox: 5spd manual

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Comments
40

15 February 2011

Sorry, as much as I want to think a 104bhp engine in a 1450kg car will be acceptable, I just can't. I am sure the penalties in consumption would be more or less zero for the addition of an extra 15bhp.

The biggest problem will be real world fuel consumption. I am sure, unless you are the most saintly person, the temptation to bury your foot deep in to the carpet to make this car move with some reasonable pace will leave you with nothing more than average consumption.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

15 February 2011

I could potentially live with the weedy engine, but the fuel consumption's not good enough to justify it.

15 February 2011

[quote Chris576] I could potentially live with the weedy engine, but the fuel consumption's not good enough to justify it.[/quote]

64mpg not worth it? Over 51mpg for the 2.0 with 145g of CO2. I'd say that's a pretty good comprimise. Added to that the greenline starts at £20k (about the same as a Focus 1.6tdci!) and you can get over £2,5k off without working too hard it's amazing value. Huge, comfortable estate that sips fuel as long as you don't boot it. Perfect motorway cruiser (74mpg on extra-urban). Did I mention £30 per year road tax if you're a private buyer? 1450kg really impresses me for such a large car as well.

16 February 2011

I like the Superb but agree this model may not be the best .

Previously owned a Rover 75 2.0cdt tourer and that had 115bhp and weighed 1500kg gave 48mpg and was okayish once you were up to speed .

Cant help but think this would be slower than the Rover which is a shade too slow . Attractive though the running costs might be I would go for the 138bhp version .

Must agree the car offers a lot of metal for the money though . This or a focus is a no brainer .

16 February 2011

Superbs have the ultimate fuel saving system, you can't put any fuel in for the 1st 5 months.

Well thats how long the waiting list was last time I checked.

Not sure about this model though, I keep seeing power going up on many vehicles 160, 170, 180, 190 bhp diesels but the performance figures hardly get better at all. What are they using for rust proofing on cars these days? concrete?

16 February 2011

how is it that bmw can produce high power diesel units with very low CO2 and mpg, and yet don't compromise on performance? I know the superb is a big old bird, but weight for weight, is probably the same (or lighter) than an E91 ED. I can imagine this superb needing you to really boot it to get going, thus negating it's high mpg potential. I'm sure it's fine on the motorway at 65, but with only 5 gears too, i can imagine the moment you go near 70 it's over 2500rpm. i think this is one downsize too much!

16 February 2011

64mpg not worth it? Over 51mpg for the 2.0 with 145g of CO2. I'd say that's a pretty good comprimise. Added to that the greenline starts at £20k (about the same as a Focus 1.6tdci!) and you can get over £2,5k off without working too hard it's amazing value. Huge, comfortable estate that sips fuel as long as you don't boot it. Perfect motorway cruiser (74mpg on extra-urban). Did I mention £30 per year road tax if you're a private buyer? 1450kg really impresses me for such a large car as well.


We have the same engine in our StupidMotion Golf, It may only cost £20 road tax but it has a fuel thirst similar to a Rover V8 on twin SU's, and this is much lighter than the much heavier Skoda Estate, Have never ever seen any evidence of fuel consumption near what the brochure says, It is always far from the truth.
VW like many other are chasing the Co2 levels rather than actual fuel consumption which is pretty Dreadful to say the least, Dont believe me just do a Google search for Bluemotion fuel consumption problems, Skoda/Seat are also mentioned with their equivalent models that use the 1.6 engine. The DPF (soot filter) strangles the weedy excuse for an engine killing any chance of half decent miles on your hard earned money.
As for Performance....As long as you rev the Kna*kers off it and your not going up hills it can keep up with a Kia Rio, (which does nothing for mpg) Saying that our car is actually a bit faster than the normal 1.6 Tdi we tried with the same Bhp, So I can only imagine the owner of this Skoda will kick himself for not buying the 2.0. especially if they use it as a fully loaded Estate.
theonlytd you like myself and many others are believing the Hype from Manufacturer's Lies, If you complain about the actual true mpg they all say the same."The car has not been actually tested but computer calculated" which means it was all performed on the bench,

16 February 2011

[quote TegTypeR]Sorry, as much as I want to think a 104bhp engine in a 1450kg car will be acceptable, I just can't.[/quote]

It's plenty - the power race over the last 20 years or so has made us forget how much a car really needs to get around. Compare the 1450kg Skoda to the 1450kg Ford Granada mkII, available 30 years ago with the following engines:

1593cc 75 bhp
1700cc 70-73 bhp
1993cc 99-101 bhp
1999cc 90 bhp
2293cc 108-114 bhp
2792cc 135-160 bhp
2112cc 63 bhp (diesel)
2498cc 69 bhp (diesel)

And I bet the Skoda has more torque than any of them.

[quote TegTypeR]The biggest problem will be real world fuel consumption. I am sure, unless you are the most saintly person, the temptation to bury your foot deep in to the carpet to make this car move with some reasonable pace will leave you with nothing more than average consumption.[/quote]

Attaining the book figure for fuel economy in any car just requires patience, self-discipline and anticipation, in my experience. If you choose to press on, or even just drive in a normal way like we all do, there's an economy penalty as with any car.

16 February 2011

[quote greedymotion]We have the same engine in our StupidMotion Golf, It may only cost £20 road tax but it has a fuel thirst similar to a Rover V8 on twin SU's. Have never ever seen any evidence of fuel consumption near what the brochure says - it is always far from the truth.[/quote]

[quote greedymotion]As for Performance....As long as you rev the Kna*kers off it...[/quote]

May I respectfully suggest your economy could potentially be improved by adjusting the nut behind the wheel...

16 February 2011

Sorry but no, 104bhp from that weedy little 1.6 tdi ( I have driven a couple of vags with it now, it's pathetic) would make the superb horrific - it's a bloody big old barge and deserves a decent engine to punt it around.

I suggest going and actually driving one of those granadas then tell me you think that's an acceptable pace for a modern car. God help anybody who is forced into one of these as a company car or buys one without driving it first!

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