Sometimes, things just work out perfectly. Hyundai could not have foreseen the financial crisis that would coincide with the launch of the previous i10; nor could it have predicted that unprecedented government incentives would be offered to make small cheap cars appear virtually irresistible.

Had Hyundai still been turning out cut-price mediocrity like the Atoz, it may have resulted in nothing more than a profitable blip. But the i10 was different. It was decent enough to look at and to sit in, well made, great value and, incredibly, rather fun to drive.

It was a critical and commercial smash, establishing the steep trajectory for growth that has only just now levelled out – six years on.

Prior to the last i10, Hyundai had been building the Atoz (or Atos or Amica, depending on market) since 1997. In fact, 2014 marked its 17th in production as the model is still sold in India as the Santro Xing.

From a European viewpoint, such a long lifespan hardly seems deserved. Whatever its nameplate, the car was indicative of the downmarket approach the manufacturer took to carve a global niche for itself.

Nevertheless, it was cheap to run, cheap to buy and could seat four adults – all virtues that were transferred to the vastly superior i10.

Now, a second-generation i10, not dissimilar to the first, takes up the torch. Significant strides forward in desirability and overall quality have been promised, and they’ll need to be discernible now that others – Volkswagen in particular – have aggressively re-entered the city car segment.

Hyundai offers its new i10 with a choice of two petrol engines, a 1.0 litre and a 1.2 litre. All come as standard with a five-speed manual transmission, but buyers can opt for the 1.2-litre engine with a five-speed automatic.

A 'Blue Drive' version of the 1.0-litre i10 is also available, which delivers reduced emissions and improved economy compared to the standard version.

So are we looking at a Fiat Panda beater or VW Up fodder? You’ll know soon enough.

Top 5 City cars

  • Volkswagen Up
    The Volkswagen Up city car isn't revolutionary, it's just quantifiably better than the opposition

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    1
  • Hyundai i10
    The Hyundai i10 is offered with either a 1.0-litre petrol engine or a 1.2-litre petrol engine

    Hyundai i10

    2
  • Suzuki Celerio
    The Celerio is an all-new city car from Suzuki

    Suzuki Celerio

    3
  • Fiat Panda
    Panda’s 4 star EuroNCAP crash score falls short of some rivals

    Fiat Panda

    4
  • Vauxhall Viva
    Vauxhall Viva 1.0 SE is priced from £7995

    Vauxhall Viva

    5

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