10
New top-spec 3-series Touring brings four-wheel drive practicality to an already excellent mix, and the result is sublime

Our Verdict

BMW 3 Series Touring
330d is the first six-cylinder diesel in the new 3 Series range

Standout compact exec gains a six-pot diesel and a bigger boot

  • First Drive

    BMW 335d Touring xDrive first drive review

    New top-spec 3-series Touring brings four-wheel drive practicality to an already excellent mix, and the result is sublime
  • First Drive

    BMW 3 Series Touring

    Practical 3-series estate loses some of the saloon’s edge, but engine and transmission impress with controlled pace and economy

What is it?

“We’ve got a BMW 335d Touring xDrive coming in,” they said at the office. “Probably be the best car in the world, won’t it? Write a few words, won’t you?” No pressure, then. 

The BMW 335d Touring xDrive is a range-topper for the BMW 3-series Touring range, which has hitherto maxed-out in diesel form with the 254bhp 330d. 

BMW’s compact executive estate doesn’t get an M variant like the saloon or coupé, so here’s a 335d instead, which brings four-wheel drive as standard, estate bodywork, and a 309bhp twin-turbocharged straight-six diesel and 50mpg. 

It’s a touch over £40k, and does 0-62mph in a touch under five seconds. Crikey. It does look like it has quite a lot going for it, doesn’t it?

What's it like?

It has quite a lot going for it. First impressions are the ones that a 3-series usually gives, and that’s a positive thing. 

The interior is well finished in high-grade materials, standard equipment is pretty generous and sensibly laid out, and accommodation is good. The rear glass can be opened separately to the tailgate. All standard, excellent, 3-series stuff.

Truth is, a 330d is already pleasing in rear-wheel drive form. The 335d xDrive seeks to add additional performance, and a bit of year-round four-wheel drive usability that, most of the time, in most of the UK, you don’t really need, but what the heck. 

In normal conditions, the torque is split 40:60 front to rear, but there’s a multi-plate clutch on the gearbox that can pitch nearly all the power (99 per cent on the graphics BMW showed us) to either the front or the back axle, whereupon the stability control will slow one spinning wheel, to allow that power to reach to the other side. The power goes to where the grip and traction is, in short.

Does it work? It does, and although the opportunities to test it to its fullest in July in Britain are limited, I found a sloping, wet-grassed field to try it out. A wet, grassy incline is to a rear-drive BMW on low-profile tyres what a Teflon pan is to a frying egg, but the system is pretty adept. 

You could just buy winter or all-season tyres for poorer conditions, of course, but 4WD will improve the 3-series as a tow car, I’m confident. And it helps traction out of damp roundabouts, too.

In normal driving, then? Most of the time you won’t notice the difference from a rear-driven BMW. Perhaps the front feels a little more leaden because there’s more weight there, and some of it unsprung. Plus in slow corners or when manoeuvring there’s not quite the response you expect because the front wheels are coping with power. 

Calling it understeer makes it sound dramatic when really it isn’t. It’s just that, if you’re familiar with rear-drive BMWs, there’s the occasional reminder that the xDrive version isn’t so consistently responsive to steering inputs.

But that’s by the by. This is a stonking car. The economy is very good, the engine smooth and quiet, the gearbox intelligent and the refinement first class. And the performance is so easy to access, it’s breathtaking. This car is exceptionally easy to get along with. 

Should I buy one?

If you can live with the access price or the monthly payments, absolutely. More than £40k for a 3-series without an M badge is quite a lot, granted, but you could have this in lieu of a larger executive car and not feel short-changed, I’m confident. 

It’s the kind of car you could run on the company scheme for a couple of years, and when it comes for replacement, absentmindedly find yourself ticking precisely the same boxes, because it has fulfilled your every need.

BMW 335d Touring xDrive

Price £42,820 0-62mph 4.9sec Top Speed 155mph Economy 50.4mpg CO2 148g/km Kerb weight 1765kg Engine 6cyls in line, 2993cc, twin-turbocharged, diesel Power 309bhp at 4400rpm Torque 465lb ft between 1500-2500rpm Gearbox 8-speed automatic

Join the debate

Comments
11

31 July 2014

Dont the pictures match the car in the review? A quick check on the DVLA website list this as a 2 litre petrol. You also state the price was £42,820, but thats the basic price, can you please tell us what the price of the one in the test was( I suspect a lot higher), thanks.

31 July 2014
Citytiger wrote:

Dont the pictures match the car in the review? A quick check on the DVLA website list this as a 2 litre petrol. You also state the price was £42,820, but thats the basic price, can you please tell us what the price of the one in the test was( I suspect a lot higher), thanks.

Until I saw your comment, I didn't notice it was a different car when I read the article this morning or that the car in the photo is not only de-badged, but it only has one exhaust compared to the 335d's two!

31 July 2014

Was thinking that the pictures don't represent the car being described....

Still I don't like BMW anyway so I'll pass.

31 July 2014

Morning J13Dog and Citytiger. Unfortunately we don't have bespoke photography of the model tested, so we've had to use pictures of a slightly different variant – the only cosmetic difference being the front and rear bumpers, exhaust and badging.

31 July 2014

i drive a 335d touring m sport so i think autocar may have got this wrong, it is really good and as quick as the f10 m5 i traded in. much more useable

1 August 2014

Interesting - I was planning on trading in my 330D for a current M3 or M5 to have a fast blast when I'm not ferrying family around - would you advise I go 335D Xdrive instead ? Britain isn't always bright and sunny, and track days aren't essential, but a bit of fun when I want it is.

31 July 2014

I'll start off by saying that I'm no big fan of BMW in general. I tend to like the odd car here and there but don't get overly excited about the majority of their ranges. Could this be the ultimate jack of all trades car though?? Over 300bhp will be a lot more than enough for most people but the 465lb ft from low down would be more telling in everyday usage. My car has around 440lb ft and the ability to stay in the same gear most of the time, effortlessly pull out of slow corners or pass slower moving vehicles safely with minimum fuss and not even having to ring it's neck makes everyday life much more relaxing and enjoyable. Add on top another 17ish mpg, 4wd security when the conditions get tough but more importantly added traction in everyday use, build quality, driver involvement and (without seeing the actual car) a bit of Q car kudos, I can't think of another car that would suit me more. Shame I'll never be able to afford a 40K car then, I'll have to stick with 1k's worth of slightly modified Saab 9-5 for now!

31 July 2014

Did any notice how dull this test car looks? Every time I see the previous 3 series (any variant) I feel jealous, they were so much better looking.

I'm on my 3rd 3 Series a 2014 320 Touring ED Auto with a bunch of options.

52.7 mpg over first 17,000 miles at an average speed of 39 mph.
Shame it's so incredibly boring. I guess another 130bhp might make the car more fun.

31 July 2014

Why pay what is likely to be upwards of £50K with options for a diesel 4WD BMW repmobile when you can get X5s, X3s, ML350s, Q5s, Q7s or better still Range Rovers either new or very lightly used for the same? A diesel 3 Series is not as good to drive as a petrol six 3 Series regardless of the horsepower and as a 4WD it is probably not as good as even an X3. If diesel does not bother you but you need 4WD surely a Range Rover or a Land Rover Discovery is a better option?

31 July 2014
spqr wrote:

Why pay what is likely to be upwards of £50K with options for a diesel 4WD BMW repmobile when you can get X5s, X3s, ML350s, Q5s, Q7s or better still Range Rovers either new or very lightly used for the same? A diesel 3 Series is not as good to drive as a petrol six 3 Series regardless of the horsepower and as a 4WD it is probably not as good as even an X3. If diesel does not bother you but you need 4WD surely a Range Rover or a Land Rover Discovery is a better option?

Why would you assume that everyone would want/need a large, tall offroad capable 4x4 and that this should be the only option worth having??????

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