Britain's road policing chief claims in new report that the '10% rule' gives the impression that it is "okay to speed"

The policy of giving leeway to speeders in 'buffer zones' is under an official review and could be scrapped, according to a report by the road policing head of the National Police Chief Council. 

The current stance, which allows the police to not prosecute those who are only a few miles an hour over when enforcing the speed limit,  was previously criticised by the NPCC's lead on road policing Anthony Bangham. 

The review, seen by the Mail on Sunday, claims that a change in message is needed "to ensure greater consistency of approach when dealing with those who exceed the speed limit". Currently a '10% plus 2mph rule' exists, meaning that those travelling less than 35mph in a 30 zone, or less than 79mph on the motorway, will not face any action. 

Speaking in January at the Police Federation road policing conference, Bangham said that "the law is set at the limit for a reason".

“They should not come whingeing to us about getting caught. If booked at 35, 34 or 33 in a 30mph zone, that cannot be unfair because they are breaking the law,” he said, according to The Guardian

Bangham suggested that the move would improve road safety.

“On average, 5 people are killed on our roads every day. Our role is to help make our roads safer, and we will seek compliance with the law to help prevent the tragedies that happen too often,” he said.

The NPCC alleged that transport minister Jesse Norman agrees that reform to road policing is needed, although didn’t clarify if the minister agreed with Bangham’s proposed policy change. A Department for Transport spokesman told The Guardian that speed limit enforcement is a police matter.

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Bangham’s proposal has drawn harsh criticism from various groups, including the AA and MPs.

IAM Roadsmart’s head of policy, Neil Greig, said: “Drivers want more enforcement, particularly of drink and drug driving, careless driving and mobile phone use, and to see more traffic police out there doing it.

"The limit is the limit but a lack of consistency on speeding has allowed urban myths about thresholds and revenue-raising to take hold in the minds of far too many drivers.

"Simply adjusting the electronic setting on a few cameras is unlikely to eradicate road deaths caused by human error, fatigue or impairment caused by drink, drugs or distraction.

"IAM Roadsmart also supports speed awareness courses, because the evidence to date suggests that most people who take them are less likely to reoffend.”

Read more

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Comments
57

31 January 2018

When Cars are fully autonomous there will be less Road offences...right?, if you want less mobile use then in the tech that going in Cars just now if someone uses a mobile in the Car in can be blocked, if you have to call the emergency services you’ll be stationary anyway, or, if you don’t have hands a built in phone,ie, you use a hand held, then as you get  a message comes on your phone saying you’ve just been fined automatically......, yes the boys in Blue will need the cash, but for how much longer?

Peter Cavellini.

289

31 January 2018

....you cant dress up a turd, and this is just that, an unashamed revenue grab!

A driver would have to spend more time looking at his speedo than where he is going or likely to hit in order to comply.

And still they fail to put up regular speed limit reminders in 30mph limits or paint them on the road....yet they have them in 40/50 mph areas...thus suggesting that the 30 mph area is less important?!!!

31 January 2018
289 wrote:

....you cant dress up a turd, and this is just that, an unashamed revenue grab!

A driver would have to spend more time looking at his speedo than where he is going or likely to hit in order to comply.

And still they fail to put up regular speed limit reminders in 30mph limits or paint them on the road....yet they have them in 40/50 mph areas...thus suggesting that the 30 mph area is less important?!!!

No, it assumes you should know when you're in a 30 zone.

289

31 January 2018

....how pray?!

Some 30 mph limits are dual carriageway FFS

And you know what assumption does. If its 30mph it must have a high danger factor and drivers need to be reminded constantly of it....unless its not about safety and all about revenue generation.

31 January 2018
289 wrote:

....how pray?!

Some 30 mph limits are dual carriageway FFS

And you know what assumption does. If its 30mph it must have a high danger factor and drivers need to be reminded constantly of it....unless its not about safety and all about revenue generation.

The Highway Code advises that street lights usually mean the limit is 30 mph unless there are signs showing otherwise. I suggest you read it, looks like you need to do a little less of blaming others and admit some self responsibility.

289

31 January 2018

I know this Marc, but it also suggests a distance between lamposts which is just ridiculous, and many 30mph areas dont have lamposts.

Pretty much all urban dual carriageways have street lamps with anything between 30 and 60 mph limits.......you can try to defend this archaic situation as much as you like but it is just plain stupid.

If there is sufficient danger to post a 30 mph limit, then repeaters should be everywhere.

31 January 2018
289 wrote:

you can try to defend this archaic situation as much as you like but it is just plain stupid.

If there is sufficient danger to post a 30 mph limit, then repeaters should be everywhere.

I've not defended it. I pointed it out. The danger or risk isn't to the motorist, it's to other vulnerable road users.

20 August 2018

I live in London . The borough that I live in and the  surrounding  Areas have  introduced  A 20 mph limit on all the roads. Which I think is stupid . I am all in favour for it around schools or  residential  Streets. But on  multi- Lane clear roads it dose not make any sense. There are people driving around at 12 to 15 mph causing a tail back. 

 

31 January 2018

In 30 zones try keeping up with a police car just doing regular patrolling without speeding yourself!   You can't.

 

In my area the council keep reducing the speeds on roads whilst extending the limits further out of town.   A neighbouring council has busier roads with more houses beside them with higher limits.

 

Visit Edinburgh were they've reduced the limit to 20 on major roads in and out the city.   Not in housing schemes where you weren't doing 30 anyway, but major roads that were perfectly safe already.

 

There's quite simply a lot of areas where the limit is too low, and that's why even the police don't respect it.

 

20 August 2018

I totally agree with you. In most of the streets in London the local councils have set a 20 mph limit To all the roads . These include multi lane roads where there have not been any accidents. There are people so worried about the limit the are driving around£ at 12 to 15 mph. I was told by a police officer this was introduced for pedestrians safety .  It this modern age with the safety and technology in cars for both the driver and pedestrians I think a 20mph blanket limit is stupid. It causes a lot of  frustration for the average driver 

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