The second generation of Smart's city cars has gone on sale, with the smaller Fortwo priced from £11,125 and the larger Forfour on sale for £11,620
5 November 2014

Pricing for the new Smart Fortwo starts at £11,125 in the UK, with the bigger Smart Forfour variant available for £495 more, starting at £11,620.

In both the Fortwo and Forfour, two engines are available, both rear-mounted and driving the rear axle. The powerplants are Renault sourced, as the French firm’s new Twingo is derived from the same technical underpinnings as the Forfour.

The base unit is a 999cc, three-cylinder naturally aspirated petrol engine. It produces maximum power of 70bhp at 6000rpm and peak torque of 67lb ft at 2850rpm.

Equipped with this engine, the Smart Fortwo can accelerate from 0-62mph in 14.4sec and hit a top speed of 94mph. Smart claims fuel economy of 68.9mpg and CO2 emissions of 93g/km.

The more powerful engine is a turbocharged 898cc, three-cylinder unit that develops 89bhp at 5500rpm and 100lb ft of torque at 2500rpm. Combined economy for the Smart Fortwo with this powerplant is put at 67.3mpg and 97g/km of CO2. It can cover the 0-62mph sprint in 10.4sec and reach 96mph.

The Smart Forfour weighs 95kg more than its compact sibling. Equipped with the naturally aspirated engine, the four-seater can achieve 67.3mpg on the combined cycle and emits 97g/km of CO2. From rest, it accelerates to 62mph in 15.9sec on its way to a top speed of 94mph.

The Forfour includes rear doors that open to an 85-degree angle, a rear bench that folds flat into the floor, leaving a 975-litre load space and the ability to carry items measuring up to 2.2-metres in length.

The third-generation city car is available in three trim levels, named Passion, Prime and Proxy.

Prices for the Smart Fortwo Passion start at £11,125. Kit includes 15-inch alloy wheels, automatic climate control, a multifunction leather steering wheel, 3.5-inch TFT colour screen, Isofix points and cruise control. 

The Prime trim level, which costs £11,820, gets uprated 15-inch bi-colour alloys, a panoramic glass roof, additional dashboard instrument pods, a textured black fabric dashboard and heated leather seats.

The Proxy variant also costs £11,820. It substitutes the heated leather seats of the Prime trim for cloth and leather Artico versions, but gains black 16-inch wheels, a chrome exhaust finisher, alloy pedals and a sports steering wheel trimmed in perforated leather. 

The trim levels are broadly similar on the Forfour, although the Proxy Forfour gets sports suspension and a 10mm lower ride height. 

Eight exterior colours are available for the Fortwo, and nine for the Forfour. Each model is available with a choice of three contrasting colours for the exposed elements of the ‘tridion’ safety cell and three shades for the front grille.

A company spokesman said the lower-powered versions of each car are expected to account for the greatest sales volumes, and the small price premium between the two- and four-seat versions is expected to encourage most buyers towards the Forfour.

From February 2015, both Smarts will be available with a five-speed manual gearbox, with a twin-clutch DCT transmission option to follow in the second quarter of the year. This system will command a premium of £995 over the manual-equipped equivalents.

Read more about the new Smart Fortwo and Forfour

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Our Verdict

The Smart Fortwo is a unique proposition. Its emotional appeal is unquestionable and it is one of the most novel and innovative cars available.

5 November 2014
The for two seems very highly priced and a fair bit uglier than the current model, a shame really.

5 November 2014
It will be interesting to see if this generation can arrest the loss-making capability of the previous generation Smarts. But it's hard to see much benefit in the rear engine layout, or the two-seater layout of the smaller model, which certainly appears expensive for what could be considered "half a car". Go back half a century and the Hillman Imp wasn't actually a bad car, but it sold hopelessly compared with the in many ways technically inferior Mini. History seems to be repeating itself.

5 November 2014
LP in Brighton wrote:
It will be interesting to see if this generation can arrest the loss-making capability of the previous generation Smarts. But it's hard to see much benefit in the rear engine layout, or the two-seater layout of the smaller model, which certainly appears expensive for what could be considered "half a car". Go back half a century and the Hillman Imp wasn't actually a bad car, but it sold hopelessly compared with the in many ways technically inferior Mini. History seems to be repeating itself.
Having owned two Imps in the past I think it more likely that it failed due to the horrendous quality issues. The original Beetle after all was rear engined and was one of the most popular cars of all time even with what was considered quirky styling at the time. I suspect a good quality car at the right price is the key in this sector. A dash of style certainly helps of course. Perhaps the problem with the ForTwo as you pointed out is the price. It's half a car compared to the competition. I think most people can live without the benefits that a very short car gives in return for four seats, a decent sized boot and perceived safety for the occassional motorway trip.

5 November 2014
LP in Brighton wrote:
the two-seater layout of the smaller model, which certainly appears expensive for what could be considered "half a car".
Oktoberfest wrote:
most people can live without the benefits that a very short car gives in return for four seats, a decent sized boot and perceived safety
In most cities, as well as in rural areas and undoubtedly in Brighton, a 4.5m car would be considered "parkable". For people who live there the ForTwo makes as much sense as air conditioning on the North Pole. It doesn't even make sense to discuss it. Also, in many urban areas like London, people do not usually drive in congested city centres because there is usable public transport. In other places, like Rome where my parents live, the Smart is not replaceable (or was, since it appears to be growing longer and/or wider with every generation), because many parking spaces (many of the few that you'll find) will be less than 4m, or indeed less than 3.50. So a Smart may be "less car" than a Fiesta or Panda and with a higher price, but it will often make the difference between "I can just about squeeze in" and "I will have to keep searching". People are prepared to pay for that, since the alternative is a scooter where you are likely to get wet or knocked down.

5 November 2014
Renault Twingo vs Smart.

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

5 November 2014
Notice that there is no automatic option on the launch price list ?

5 November 2014
...while Smart can't. This seems to suck all the charm out of the Twingo. Which should help the Twingo. And the price! Best look at it this way: £500 to double the size of your car. Note to the chaps in marketing: not too sure about Poxy as a trim level.

5 November 2014
I never understand this. If you can get 60-something mpg out of a 3 Series, why are we meant to be impressed by 68mpg in a Smart? It just somehow doesn't seem good enough.

5 November 2014
The 'exposed' elements of the tridion safety cell don't look as convincing on these two new models, particularly with the Forfour as the panels look just like the ones on the Twingo. But then, I'm probably one of the few people who still thinks the original Forfour looks good.

5 November 2014
..... for VW (and some others). Sorry Smart this just will not do, you may have got away with it when you were a 'mercedes' but now you are just a 'renault' that cache has gone. Not attractive at all and over priced. How much more is the higher output engine (was going to say bigger but someone would point out its smaller....).

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