Ferrari boss renews his attack on Formula One's new teams

Formula One’s new teams are too slow to compete in the sport and should be racing in GP2, according to Luca di Montezemolo.

The Ferrari president, who wants teams to run a third car at grand prix weekends, has decided to renew his attack on the new teams after Fernando Alonso’s chances of victory in Canada for Ferrari were wrecked by being held up in traffic.

"Cars who perform at GP2-level should not be allowed to participate in F1 races because they are supposed to race on Sunday mornings," di Montezemolo told Gazzetta dello Sport.

"Our car's race pace was good enough for victory. Let's hope that, in the future, there won't be mistakes in pushing a button nor in lapping cars that put us at a disadvantage, because we've already gone through that."

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18 June 2010

Is Luca really worried about how quick these new teams are or is he simply diverting attention away from his own team who have been lacklustre this year?

Let's not forget that these new teams didn't have F1 cars this time last year. They're actually doing ok compared against a team who've been in F1 since it's conception!

And also Luca should consider himself lucky that Alonso has brought 0.8s with him like he did at McLaren.....

;-)

18 June 2010

I thought Alonso, who says the Ferrari isn't fast enough yet, replaced Kimi Raikkonnen at Ferrari because of his driving abilities?

Could it be that Luca di Montezemolo want's a return to the old "Ferrari wins, whatever!" rule ?

18 June 2010

Surely the best option isn't to kick the new teams out, but rather to bring back the 107% rule. If they are fast enough, they can race. If not, they can pack up their trucks and head home while everyone else races. I also have no problem with letting more teams in, rather than a franchise system as at present. The fastest get to race, the slowest don't. Of course, this may inconvenience Ferrari if they ever decide to give Badoer another go.

18 June 2010

Sour grapes at Maranello me thinks. Get over it Luca! Hamilton showed he was the quickest when needed, and no amount of grumbling about new teams will change that. And I say welcome to the new teams, the more the better, so that one day we hope to see an end to the monopoly the like of which we have at the moment. If you really want to have no new teams, then lets do a deal, no new teams for no Bernie, no charismatically by-passed drivers, and no winging Ferrari bosses. Sounds about fair enough to me. Or have things now gone strangely quiet in Modena?

18 June 2010

I would like to agree with those correspondents who have accused Luca di Montezemolo of sour grapes with his latest whinge regarding the new F1 teams. It seems that any thing Ferrari disagrees with either Luca moans or the Ferrari website chips in. This proves the point that no one likes a whinging loser and they should concentrate on making their car faster.

18 June 2010

[quote disco.stu]

Surely the best option isn't to kick the new teams out, but rather to bring back the 107% rule. If they are fast enough, they can race. If not, they can pack up their trucks and head home while everyone else races. I also have no problem with letting more teams in, rather than a franchise system as at present. The fastest get to race, the slowest don't. Of course, this may inconvenience Ferrari if they ever decide to give Badoer another go.

[/quote]

Sorry, what was the "107% rule"?

As for the rest: I think this is sour grapes. Lotus actually aren't that far off the pace. Next year they'll be seriously in competition with the Force Indias and Toro Rossos and suchlike, if they get the car right (and, let's face it, Lotus know a thing or two about making a car handle - the team may be notionally Malaysian, but the cars are still built at Hethel). I reckon Mike Gascoigne's analysis, of podium finishes toward the back end of their third year, and race wins in their fourth, is probably pretty much right. OK, so the Virgins and Hispanias are pretty hopeless - but even so, there are upgrades coming, and Hispania have severed their contract with Dallara, and I reckon, with two damn good drivers already on board, next year could see a big improvement from them, too. Glock and di Grassi are bloody good, too, when in the right car. I think Eye-tie Monty needs to stop whining and look at what he can do to make his team faster - I haven't noticed Martyn Whitmarsh or Christian Horner or Ross Brawn moaning about being caught in traffic, but they haven't been lacklustre. Well, Mercedes haven't had it all their way this year, but McLaren and Red Bull are fast, much faster than the Fezzas.

18 June 2010

[quote Straight Six Man]Sorry, what was the "107% rule"?[/quote]

I believe that it was a rule saying that if the slowest qualifier wasn't within 107% of the leaders time they couldn't race, or something like that. ie: if the pole sitter qualifies with a 1:00:00 dead lap, last place could only be 7 seconds slower ie: 1:07:00.

18 June 2010

[quote crazyal]

[quote Straight Six Man]Sorry, what was the "107% rule"?[/quote]

I believe that it was a rule saying that if the slowest qualifier wasn't within 107% of the leaders time they couldn't race, or something like that. ie: if the pole sitter qualifies with a 1:00.00 dead lap, last place could only be 7 seconds slower ie: 1:07:00.

[/quote]

107% of 1:00:00 does not equal 1:07.00 (60 seconds to a minute, not 100). So a pole lap of 1:00.00 would mean a bottom end barrier of 1:04.20. Mind you, I would be against any kind of restriction - I find it much more interesting (mostly) to watch what's going on with Lotus than with Ferrari.

18 June 2010

I once encountered slower cars whilst I was out driving. Instead of insisting that they drive elsewhere or at a different time, I thought I'd overtake them instead. It was a lot less hassle, and I didn't make myself look puerile by demanding their removal from the roads either...

18 June 2010

[quote bendubs]

I once encountered slower cars whilst I was out driving. Instead of insisting that they drive elsewhere or at a different time, I thought I'd overtake them instead. It was a lot less hassle, and I didn't make myself look puerile by demanding their removal from the roads either...

[/quote]

Yeah, but it can be bloody annoying when you're stuck behind Granny in her Micra for miles, with nowhere to overtake (to be fair to Ferrari). Mind you, the circuits used by F1 are wide enough that there's little excuse for failing to overtake a vastly slower car...

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