New car has wider track and more space
6 October 2009

The next-generation 911 cabrio has been spied testing, ahead of its launch in 2011.

The 998 will replace the current 911, which itself has only just been refreshed, and Porsche is promising the car will be far more competent than its predecessor.

See the hi-res Porsche 998 cabrio picture gallery

The biggest alteration appears to be the wider track, disguised by the fake turbo-style vents in the rear bodywork, aimed at improving high-speed agility.

The front lights are said to be slightly more upright, harking back to early 911s, to appease safety regulations. The exterior mirrors are now mounted on the doors, rather than the front of the side windows, possibly to improve rear visibility. The plastic trim that runs along the edges of the roof, evident on the 997, has also disappeared.

Porsche is also thought to be working on a radical aerodynamic package, with a prominent lip added to the rear spoiler, presumably for added downforce and extra cooling of the engine bay.

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There is also likely to be a slight alteration to the front end suspension geometry, with an increase in camber.

We know that other major aerodynamic innovations being considered for the 998 include variable lift mechanisms for the front and rear, so the modification to this prototype’s rear spoiler could prove to have a deeper significance.

The engine line-up is expected to be an evolution of the current range. The latest six-cylinder direct injection engines will have an even greater emphasis on economy and emissions.

Photos: CarPix

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Comments
14

6 October 2009

998? Why not just call it a 911, cause that's what it is...

More room in the back sounds good, but I doubt it'll improved much...

6 October 2009

[quote Autocar]a slight alteration to the front end suspension geometry, with an increase in camber providing a greater tow-out effect.[/quote]

'toe-out effect', you meant. Blimey, which towrag wrote this ignorant tripe?

6 October 2009

[quote Topkat]998? Why not just call it a 911, cause that's what it is...[/quote]

998 is the series model number,the internal type designation and how the manufacturer and dealers refer to it. the current car being 997 with the 996 and 993 preceeding it it.....

6 October 2009

let me know if it looks any different when it gets to 1008

6 October 2009

" The biggest alteration appears to be the wider track, disguised by the fake turbo-style vents in the rear bodywork, aimed at improving high-speed agility."

Just what the 911 needed yet a WIDER track? What the neww 997 don't have enough grip is that the problem?

So let me understand, this is now as big as a 928, wow its no longer a car for the back roads, its not a sports car. Nice job Porsche. J

6 October 2009

[quote jl4069]

So let me understand, this is now as big as a 928, wow its no longer a car for the back roads, its not a sports car. Nice job Porsche. J

[/quote]

so many Haters on this website...

6 October 2009

[quote Howey]998 is the series model number,the internal type designation and how the manufacturer and dealers refer to it. the current car being 997 with the 996 and 993 preceeding it it.....[/quote]

Now I understand! The next one will be 999! :-)

6 October 2009

Its great to see Porsche breaking the mould with this innovative and brand new look for the 911.

7 October 2009

Go away you TW*T!

11 October 2009

[quote jl4069]

" The biggest alteration appears to be the wider track, disguised by the fake turbo-style vents in the rear bodywork, aimed at improving high-speed agility."

Just what the 911 needed yet a WIDER track? What the neww 997 don't have enough grip is that the problem?

So let me understand, this is now as big as a 928, wow its no longer a car for the back roads, its not a sports car. Nice job Porsche. J

[/quote]

I agree.

The 911 is following the trend of other modern cars - getting larger and larger.

Personally, I would prefer Porsche make its cars smaller.

Smaller cars would mean lighter cars; not to mention, easier to maneuver.

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