World's first hybrid supermini scheduled for 2010
18 December 2008

Honda will be boosting its hybrid line-up in 2010 with a petrol-electric Jazz.

The world’s first hybrid supermini will be powered by the same mechanicals as the forthcoming Insight hatchback.

That means a 1.3-litre petrol engine, augmented by an electric motor. In a car the size and weight of the Jazz that should translate into some spectacular economy and CO2 emissions. Expect around 80mpg and 90g/km CO2 emissions.

Honda is hoping that a hybrid Jazz will help it reach its target of selling 500,000 hybrids per year. It will be the company’s third hybrid after the Insight, due to go on sale next March, and the CR-Z coupe, which is arriving in 2010.

Chas Hallett

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Comments
14

18 December 2008

Actually the company's 4th hybrid. The Civic IMA is already on sale...

18 December 2008

I can't understand how and why Honda would try to cram an IMA version of the same four cylinder engine under the bonnet of the Jazz which is already crowded. Far better to use a modernised version of the original Insight's 1.0-litre hybrid triple, which, with its IMA pack, would occupy roughly the same underbonnet space as the larger four and do the job more cheaply and just as efficiently.

19 December 2008

Personally, I think this is the most sensible application of Honda's hybrid technology yet. The car is the right size - not too big (like the Prius) and not niche (like the original Insight) - and should appeal to a lot wider audience than any of the other products currently on sale, assuming they price it right.

I am also going to stick my neck out and tip it to be the Jazz's largest selling model when it arrives.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

19 December 2008

[quote TegTypeR]Personally, I think this is the most sensible application of Honda's hybrid technology yet. [/quote]

I don't. What's the point of hybridding one of the most economical and low CO2 producing cars on the market ? To drive costs up further ? Surely this technology is best employed to the cars that emit the most of whatever gas the government is attempting to convince us is most likely to destroy the world completely before the next election (Gordo saves the world) ?

There's no way in the world that I would spend one iota more on a hybrid small car. This is yet another vanity product for people who want to follow the rapidly fading trend of climate change paranoia.

19 December 2008

I don't agree that Hybrid technology is best applied to the most polluting vehicles. If the customer's objective is to cause the least possible environmental damage (and some of us do actually believe that this is necessary..), then a small, practical car with a highly efficient power-train is the answer. Well done Honda. This is a brilliant product and deserves to do well. I can see others following suit.

19 December 2008

[quote Steve Steele]What's the point of hybridding one of the most economical and low CO2 producing cars on the market ? To drive costs up further ?[/quote]

Well if it costs, say £1500 more than a non hybrid and it gets 80 mpg, i would rather pay the money up front to Honda than constantly pass it on to Shell/Esso et al and the Govt through the life of the car as I fill up with petrol.

I see the motor manufacturers as far more deserving of my money than that rabble.

Where has all Japanese design went to?

19 December 2008

There is a lot of anti hybrid feeling out there, from people who miss the point. probably because most of the cars fitted with it so far have been pretty uninspiring. But the truth is it works, why waiste energy when you brake when it can be stored to assist acceleration later, and reduce fuel consumption.

My hope is that Honda will start making manual hybrids again soon. the original insight and civic were both available that way, and in my opinion much better for it. Furthermore its something Toyota cant do. The electric motor in the Honda system is effectively the flywheel, whereas in the toyota it is in the gearbox.

A manual hybrid Jazz sounds pretty good to me. A manual CR-Z sounds much better.

19 December 2008

[quote Steve Steele]What's the point of hybridding one of the most economical and low CO2 producing cars on the market ? [/quote]

The problem with the Jazz is that it's not particularly economical or CO2 efficient, especially in CVT form. Just check the figures out.

[quote Steve Steele]To drive costs up further ?[/quote]

Initially may be, but it all works on supply and demand. The more the sell, the more they produce, the cheaper it becomes.

[quote Steve Steele]Surely this technology is best employed to the cars that emit the most of whatever gas the government is attempting to convince us is most likely to destroy the world completely before the next election (Gordo saves the world) ?[/quote]

Surely, as the technology is seamless, shouldn't it be applied to any car that requires the application, small, large or performance.

[quote Steve Steele]There's no way in the world that I would spend one iota more on a hybrid small car. This is yet another vanity product for people who want to follow the rapidly fading trend of climate change paranoia.[/quote]

You are of course correct that the whole environmental argument is falling flat at the moment, be it down to lack of evidence or people lack of willingness to pay to be green. I for one don't subscribe this way of thinking and certainly wouldn't buy one of these on a vanity basis. I would however buy one to save money, and this is where (as I originally said - price permitting) this car can / will be a winner.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

19 December 2008

The average Jazz does 55mpg - ish. That's pretty good really. You'd have to run it for some considerable mileage at 80mpg in order for it to be worth an extra £1,500. What's the point ?

It's a vanity product. Buy the petrol one and be happy. There's no evidence so far to suggest that it will get cheaper the more that are made. The only way it will look cheaper is as a percentage of a much higher car price i.e. £1,500 part of £10,000 is 15% whereas if you bung £1,500 onto a £60,000 Jag then not only will the benefit be greater on a gas guzzler but also the cost is much less significant to the overall spend. Paying an extra 15% onto a little car like a Jazz (if that's what it will cost) is nonsense.

19 December 2008

[quote TegTypeR]Surely, as the technology is seamless, shouldn't it be applied to any car that requires the application, small, large or performance.[/quote]

It's not though. You need to find space for some of the kit - open the boot of the Prius and you'll spot it's not as big as it first looks, because a chunk of it is lost to the battery pack. I imagine that on yet smaller cars, the problems of packaging get bigger. The flip side is that the hybrid technology seems to work best with low loads (I guess because the electric motors and batteries are actually quite small), and hence it needs a relatively light car to work best.

Which presents a bit of a paradox.

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