From £16,700
Stop-start tech added to popular crossover as part of a range of revisions

Our Verdict

Nissan Qashqai 2007-2014
Nissan describes the Qashqai as a "new take on the family car"

The Nissan Qashqai is short on cabin flexibility next to newer rivals but offers a comfortable, fuss-free drive

15 January 2011

What is it?

Nissan’s popular British-built Qashqai crossover received a makeover in early 2010 with subtly refreshed styling, interior quality upgrades and under-the-skin changes to boost ride quality and reduce interior noise.

This was followed up later in the year with tweaks to the engine range. So this is our first chance to test the newly Euro5-compliant 1.6-litre petrol engine, which gets a small 2bhp boost to 115bhp and a similar rise in torque to 117lb ft. And the addition of stop-start, the first Nissan to benefit from the technology, drops CO2 emissions from 144g/km to 139g/km.

What’s it like?

The Qashqai is Nissan’s biggest seller in the UK, and it’s easy to see why. We noted in our earlier test of the chassis and interior upgrades that the Qashqai is a comfortable, refined and accomplished performer, with an airy cabin and an excellent driving position. None of these traits are lost in this round of engine upgrades.

While the Qashqai range remains an extremely competitive proposition overall, this engine would not be our default choice. Its real-life economy is impressive at around 40mpg, but it lacks the necessary power and torque for swift, smooth and quiet progress.

The engine, although smoother and quieter around town, also feels strained on the motorway and would benefit from a sixth gear to improve refinement and economy.

But there are no such problems with the stop-start system, which operates in the background without intrusion and delivers noticeable benefits to the headline economy and CO2 figures.

Should I buy one?

We’d have no hesitation in recommending a Qashqai, which remains an interesting and well-executed crossover alternative to mainstream rivals such as the Ford Focus and Volkswagen Golf.

If you’re prepared to sacrifice a few of the toys fitted to this generously equipped n-tec model, a 1.5 diesel Qashqai can be had for the same money, and that model offers even better economy and CO2 emissions and enough torque to provide a more rewarding drive.

Nissan Qashqai 1.6 n-tec stop-start

Price: £19,445; Top speed: 113mph; 0-6mpg: 11.9sec; Economy: 47.9mpg; CO2: 139g/km; Engine: 4cyls, 1598cc, petrol; Power: 115mph at 6000rpm; Torque: 117lb ft at 4400rpm; Gearbox: 5spd manual

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Comments
18

27 January 2011

Apparently the Qasqai has been a great success. But it hardly ever rates a mention in Autocar, why is that?

27 January 2011

[quote blowerbentley]Apparently the Qasqai has been a great success.[/quote]

I can't honestly see why. It looks like an SUV, but watching one trying to get up a snow covered road with a slight incline during the bad weather, it was so obvious that it wasn't. The driver eventually gave up, turned round after a lot of sliding about and went home. They obviously appeal to drivers who think that a slightly commanding view will make up for the fact that it's just a small estate on big wheels.

There's also another reason and I hesitate to mention it.....but it seems to be the Nissan of choice for people who qualify for a car on Motability. That's according to a friend in the motor trade who isn't a Nissan dealer. It might just be jealousy, I suppose!

27 January 2011

[quote n50pap]It looks like an SUV[/quote]

I understand that the vast majority of those made have 4 wheel drive, but in our CO2 obsessed country nearly all sold here are just 2wd.

28 January 2011

[quote artill]

[quote n50pap]It looks like an SUV[/quote]

I understand that the vast majority of those made have 4 wheel drive, but in our CO2 obsessed country nearly all sold here are just 2wd.

[/quote]

I'm not so sure it is down to CO2. People that I know who have gone for the Qashqai have all bought it because of it's tough looks and because it's not a traditional 4x4 (which means their friends can't moan at them!). They like the high riding driving position in what they pecieve to be a "normal" car.

Aside from that, I tested one of these a couple of years back in 1.5dci format and it was a cracking car. These improvements look like they've made it even better.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

31 January 2011

[quote TegTypeR]People that I know who have gone for the Qashqai have all bought it because of it's tough looks and because it's not a traditional 4x4 (which means their friends can't moan at them!). They like the high riding driving position in what they pecieve to be a "normal" car.[/quote]

Image. Image. Ooh I like being higher up! (and care not that the person behind now has a worse view of the road.)

Pathetic stuff. I despair at the Qashqai... a success for UK industry, but a car for mundane people.

31 January 2011

Love these cars, such a revolutionary car, off road car looks, but as cheap to run as a normal hatchback, always wanted one, rather have one then a 2wd Freelander any day.

31 January 2011

Leased a 2.0l CVT petrol one of these for a year here as it was the cheapest hatchback available amongst a sea of saloons . Much more practical for carting relatives and stuff around in . Smooth to drive good visibility and nothing went wrong .

A good car if what you want out of a car is normal hassle free family duties . Got on better with it than a previous Mazda 6 saloon . Would still prefer one to the Golf /Focus range of hatches because it dares to be different .

If it is so bad why has every other manufacturer jumped on the crossover bandwagon then ?

Simple it sells .

31 January 2011

[quote n50pap]I can't honestly see why. It looks like an SUV, but watching one trying to get up a snow covered road with a slight incline during the bad weather, it was so obvious that it wasn't. The driver eventually gave up, turned round after a lot of sliding about and went home. They obviously appeal to drivers who think that a slightly commanding view will make up for the fact that it's just a small estate on big wheels.[/quote]

hm, not driven one have you.

First, there are 4WD Qashqai variants available. It's not as though Nissan don't know how to build an all-wheel or all-terrain vehicle, so if you demand the ability to climb slippery slopes then you know which one to go for.

Second, the reason the Qashqai has been a success is because - as Old Toad said above - it is incredibly easy to drive, sits high, is quiet with an unexpectedly fine ride quality, and with modish but not overly fashionable looks is as valid a family car choice as any equivalent estate. Plus high demand means they hold their value as well a more expensive 'premium' alternative and thus the PCP/leasing figures are far less punishing.

Not forgetting the fact that everyone knows where their nearest Nissan dealer is and the servicing isn't anywhere near as pricey as on more neighbour-impressing rivals.

P.S. There are far, far more Nissan Notes on the Motability stock list at any given moment, and in any case the total number of Nissans is dwarfed completely by just one Ford: the Focus.

31 January 2011

[quote ThwartedEfforts]P.S. There are far, far more Nissan Notes on the Motability stock list at any given moment,[/quote]

Absoultely - the high roof line makes the note the car of choice for those with restricted access issues.

As for the Qashqai - it's pretty much had the sub-freelander niche to itself for quite a while now.

31 January 2011

I quite like the Qashqai and though its not the sort of car I'd buy I can see why a lot of people would. Those alloys on the test vehicle are awful, though...

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