Incredible 268mph swansong Veyron will take some beating

Our Verdict

Bugatti Veyron
The world doesn't need a car like the Bugatti Veyron, but the fact it exists at all is reason for celebration

The Bugatti Veyron redefines what's possible in a road car, but does it justify its eye-watering price?

17 October 2010

What is it?

There are all sorts of crazed statistics about the new £2m Bugatti Veyron Super Sport with which you can fray the outer edges of your imagination. Quite apart from the fact that it boasts 198bhp beyond that of the regular 987bhp Veyron and can do 268mph, when the crankshaft of this car’s 8.0-litre W16 engine is rotating at precisely 6400rpm in seventh gear, it will quaff its way through a 100-litre tank of fuel in just under eight minutes.

The W16 quad-turbo engine also develops its maximum torque figure the entire time between 3000 and 5000rpm, so there is no torque ‘peak’ as such. How much twisting power does it actually generate? How does 1105lb ft grab you? Or, to put it another way, near enough twice as much as a Noble M600 – one of the most potent cars anyone on this magazine has ever driven.

But the number to end all numbers concerning the Super Sport, the one that will stop you in your tracks and make you either laugh or cry, is this; in the same time that it takes a McLaren F1 to get from rest to 200mph, the Veyron SS can go from zero to 200mph and back again – and then do zero to 60mph as well. Think about that for a moment – and then think about it for a little while longer.

There will be just 30 Veyron Super Sports in total, each one handmade at Bugatti’s small factory in Molsheim, at the foothills near the woods of Alsace. So far Bugati has sold some 260 Veyrons since the original planned batch of 300 went on sale in 2005. Think of the Super Sport therefore as the last and final version – the best version no less – of the world’s best car.

What’s it like?

What’s perhaps most amazing of all about this most amazing of cars, however, is that despite its heart-wrenching, lung-bursting performance, it is also quite incredibly civilised to drive. Such was Bugatti’s desire to provide the Super Sport with a refined personality, the overall impression you get after spending a day at the wheel is indeed one of supreme luxury.

When you put your foot down and feel your internal organs squeezed to one side under the sheer g-force, there is also the unique, rather lovely sensation of sitting in your favourite armchair in your favourite lounge while doing so. And in the end it is the Veyron Super Sport’s pure breadth of ability that separates it so completely from the rest of the automotive world – the fact that it can throw you at the horizon with sufficient force to make you feel physically uncomfortable, while at the same time providing you with the sights, sounds and smells of the most luxuriant car money can buy.

By fitting bigger turbos, bigger intercoolers and improving the way it breathes, Bugatti was able to generate the extra power and torque required without trying too hard at all. What needed rather more time, effort and re-engineering skill was making sure the powertrain remained cool enough when on full reheat – as did the retuning of the chassis, suspension, braking and steering systems. And, most crucially of all, the aerodynamic package as well.

Because the Super Sport accelerates that much faster than the regular Veyron, the speed and angle at which it deploys its various wings had to be completely recalibrated – otherwise, says Bugatti, the car would have become ‘terminally unstable’ before it got anywhere near its top speed. Hence the reason the massive bi-plane wing now emerges from the redesigned rear bodywork at 180kmh and at a different speed/angle compared with the standard car, whose wing doesn’t appear until 220kmh.

You can genuinely feel the difference on the move, too. The Super Sport very obviously has more straight-line performance than before; however fast you think it might feel when you put your foot to the floor and hold it there for a few seconds, double it, add another 100 per cent and you still won’t be anywhere near. Yet despite its ability to go into hyperspace harder and faster than the standard car, the Super Sport’s extra high speed stability and, surprisingly, its superior ride comfort (afforded by a set of ultra-trick new Sachs dampers) are every bit as apparent as its extra go.

And that’s before you even mention its gearbox, which remains, in my humble opinion, the stand-out item in a car that hits quite a few peaks. The speed and smoothness with which the Super Sport shifts gear, up or down its seven ratios, is absolutely and completely extraordinary. The fact that it has 1105lb ft of torque to deal with while doing so proves, more than any other aspect of this incredible car, just how big an achievement the Veyron – Super Sport or otherwise – actually is.

Should I buy one?

As swansongs go the Veyron Super Sport will take some beating. Of the other 25 Super Sports that Bugatti will make over the next two years, just six cars remain unsold. If you fancy one, in other words, best get on the phone to the UK’s most renowned Bugatti dealer, Jack Barclay of Berkley Square, London, PDQ.

Let’s hope, no, let us pray that there’s more to come from Planet Molsheim in the months and years to come.

Bugatti Veyron Super Sport

Price: 1.65m euros, plus local taxes; 0-62mph: 2.5sec (claimed); Top speed: 268mph; Economy: 12.2mpg; CO2: 539g/km; Kerb weight: 1838kg; Engine: W16, 7993cc, petrol, turbocharged; Installation: mid, longitudinal, four wheel-drive; Power: 1184bhp at 6400rpm; Torque: 1105lb ft at 3000-5000rpm; Power-to-weight: 644bhp per tonne; Gearbox: 7-speed paddle shift dual-clutch

 

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Comments
71

18 October 2010

In the covershot on the homepage, Steve looks tiny (no offence Steve) behind the wheel. Could just be the angle of the pic but holy smoke that Bugatti looks huge. Better go cash-in my £113m lotto ticket and go buy one...

18 October 2010

"That makes it a mere four times thirstier than a 650-seater Airbus A380."

blatant nonsense

18 October 2010

Steve, that was an enjoyable read, thank you, but could you make your mind up about the engine; is it a W12 or a W16?

18 October 2010

[quote Amanitin]

"That makes it a mere four times thirstier than a 650-seater Airbus A380."

blatant nonsense [/quote]

i was wondering about that as well. i think he meant 'relatively speaking'.

18 October 2010

3l per passenger for the airbus as opposed to the Bug on full tilt, theoretically its not nonsense but more out of context. Still makes you think!!

18 October 2010

It is an utterly stupendous car which undoubtedly is one of the truly great cars of this era. As Sutters says not only insanely fast but also utterly refined as well. You might well have to watch the running costs and probably need your own oil well. There looks as though there will be faster cars in future but how many will be better built?

18 October 2010

impressive yes: a feat of engineering : yes pig ugly : Oh Yes !

18 October 2010

Pig ugly?, as opposed to what?, and Enzo?, a 458 Italia, the Supersport is hardly a triumph of function over form, is it?, there are other cars worthy of this accolade.

Peter Cavellini.

18 October 2010

I've only ever seen one Veyron on the road and it was stuck for several miles behind a 15 year old Fiat Ducato van that was belching diesel fumes like, well, like a 15 year old Fiat Ducato van. Some moral about the aspiration and the reality in there somewhere.

18 October 2010

Kind of agree, the supersport is no back road hot hatch, even with this kind of power and performance a nackered old van is to much for Supersport, but continental roads, a very different story.

Peter Cavellini.

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