Matt has been getting to grips with the Type R's online following, and has been recommended a bespoke oil for the car. Can it really make a difference?
4 February 2016

The Type R badge attracts a cult following, and I’m having so much fun in the Civic that it’s difficult not to be converted. I’ve been dipping into the civictype-r.co.uk forum to vicariously revel in the excitement with which other owners discuss their cars.

The forum is full of useful snippets, including one on suitable oil for the Type R. Given that I cover 500 miles a week, I like to have a bottle close at hand, and it turns out that there’s a recommended oil type for the turbocharged 2.0 i-VTEC engine above and beyond the 0W-20-grade lubricant specified.

Honda has got into bed with Castrol to produce Edge Professional H, which is “co-engineered” between the car company and lubricant maker.

We put the 306bhp Honda Civic Type R through its paces on the road and track

Is this just a marketing gimmick to encourage passionate Honda folk to buy Castrol products? My cynical journalist head says possibly, so I asked Castrol for more info. The company hadn’t got back to me by the time we went to press, so I’ll report back at a later date.

Either way, the marketing worked, because I dutifully ordered a litre of Edge Professional H online from Cox Motor Parts in Morecambe. Great service; it arrived in Twickenham less than 24 hours later.

So does using the specified oil make a difference to the Civic’s manners? Some owners on the forum reckon it is more responsive. I’m not convinced I can sense a difference. It’s difficult to tell with so many outside variables impacting on every drive, but on the other hand, there’s a satisfaction in knowing you’ve done right by your car and hopefully increased the engine’s prospects of a long and healthy life.

An oil-related note: I don’t get on with the Type R’s dipstick, with its orange marker at the business end. It’s much harder to read than a strip of metal with two nicks in it to show high and low levels. The oil seems to pool at the bottom of the grooved section. Or am I being the dipstick?

Honda Civic Type R

Mileage 3959; Price £32,295; Price as tested £32,820; Economy 32.3mpg; Faults None; Expenses Oil £13.71

Previous Honda Civic Type R reports

First report - the Civic Type R joins our fleet

Our Verdict

Honda Civic Type-R
Honda's new Civic Type R is powered by a 306bhp 2.0-litre turbocharged four cylinder engine

Probably the most capable front-wheel-drive car in production today, with only limited edition specials getting close

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Comments
15

4 February 2016
"Some owners on the forum reckon it is more responsive. I’m not convinced " and nor should you be, even the great Lewis Hamilton wouldn't be able to tell you difference between the recommended oil and a more expensive one regarding that aspect.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

4 February 2016
Of course there will be no noticeable differences between any lubricants which meet the required API rating and viscosity requirements for this car. What I'd be more interested to learn is whether this Honda's engine is designed to take advantage of the higher octane petrol in superunleaded? If so, then it may well be beneficial to run on this fuel. But if not, then again there may be no advantage - and the full 310 horsepower (or whatever the figure is) may well be achieved with ordinary 95RON unleaded, without any penalty.

4 February 2016
I recon the difference in the oil will be Fuck All Squared, especially since you only ordered 1 Lt. Even if this new oil is technically better or more suited to this engine and you topped it up with the full litre, that only represents about 20% of the capacity of the system so not much to be gained by doing that. On the subject of dip sticks I always prefer the solid variety which allows the oil to stay on the stick as you extract it from the engine, too many of the very flexible sticks have little trace of the oil visible after they have been dragged out from the block. Poor design me thinks.

 Offence can only be taken not given- so give it back!

4 February 2016
Is this the level of insight in long term tests these days? How about running costs, liveability, ergonomics etc?

4 February 2016

Scrap, this is the second of several updates on the car we'll run during the year, and I'll try to cover off different topics in each one. You've given me some good starting points! There is also our full road test to consider elsewhere on this site.

4 February 2016
Simply changing it after running in with a quality oil and perhaps then twice a year is what will protect the engine. What oil doesnt matter as long as it meets manufacturer's requirements.

ofir

4 February 2016
More to the point, why is the car using oil? its brand new, modern engines should use little or no oil between services, and 500 miles a week is not excessive.

4 February 2016

That's kind of the point I was pushing at, Citytiger - how can I tell when the dipstick is quite hard to gauge? If you can make it out in the picture of the dipstick, at first glance it looks like a very low oil reading, but I don't actually think it is. The handbook isn't much use at shedding any light on it and the design seems quite poor. I'd also beg to differ with your assertion that engines shouldn't necessarily use little or no oil - the oil light came on my previous car, Octavia diesel, with 4000 miles on the clock and when I checked it definitely needed a top up. Appreciate the Civic has a radically different kind of motor, of course.

4 February 2016
Matt, this is a Honda you are now driving, not a VAG product. Your days of having to have 4L of oil handy just make it to the next service should be over.

4 February 2016
Matt Burt wrote:
That's kind of the point I was pushing at, Citytiger - how can I tell when the dipstick is quite hard to gauge? If you can make it out in the picture of the dipstick, at first glance it looks like a very low oil reading, but I don't actually think it is. The handbook isn't much use at shedding any light on it and the design seems quite poor. I'd also beg to differ with your assertion that engines shouldn't necessarily use little or no oil - the oil light came on my previous car, Octavia diesel, with 4000 miles on the clock and when I checked it definitely needed a top up. Appreciate the Civic has a radically different kind of motor, of course.
lots of modern engines dont even have a dipstick, but have electronic sensors for oil quantity and quality, and the only engine I have ever had to really keep an eye on was the wife's RX8, but that was a rotary engine.. Rather than asking questions on here, or on an owners forum, why not pop into your local dealer for advice, that is what they are there for, on the whole Honda engines are fairly bullet proof.

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