VW says it will go about hybrids in a different way to rivals, going for performance and economy
3 November 2010

Volkswagen will use its sixth-generation Jetta to launch an innovative new sporty hybrid system that will break the mold of current mainstream hybrids by offering increased performance as well as economy.

“We’re not an experienced hybrid maker like Toyota or Honda, so we don’t just want to come up with what everyone else already has,” said Jetta technical project manager Michael Hinz. “We want to do something unique.”

Hinz said hybrid systems could be used to boost power or improve efficiency. A turbocharged petrol engine is preferable for the power boost route and a diesel-electric system for economy.

The Jetta’s petrol-electric hybrid system, already confirmed for Europe in 2012, will harness one of the firm’s smaller-capacity TSI petrol engines, raising the possibility that VW’s mainstream hybrid system will be used to improve the performance of its already punchy turbo petrol range.

Hinz said the Jetta’s hybrid system “would not be like the one on the Touareg”, which was designed to boost efficiency. “Are hybrids really fuel efficient? Not really, as you are adding more weight,” said Hinz. “Yes, we could do a power hybrid. We’re certainly not going to do both. You must decide to go with one or the other.”

Volkswagen previewed its hybrid system on its New Compact Coupé (NCC, pictured) concept at this year's Detroit motor show. NCC's petrol engine is a 1.4-litre Twincharger, with 148bhp and 177lb ft of torque. It’s supported by an electric motor integrated into the gearbox; with 27bhp and 103lb ft, it draws electricity from a 1.1kWh lithium ion battery housed under the boot to boost the NCC’s overall output to 175bhp and 280lb ft.

VW claims the NCC will hit 62mph in 8.1sec on the way to a top speed of 141mph. Combined fuel economy is put at 67.3mpg, and CO2 emissions are 98g/km.

Hinz also confirmed that a hybrid Golf will be made and its powertrain will be a development of the one launched in the Jetta.

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Comments
18

3 November 2010

Could this mean we end up with the next Golf GTi being a 1.4 (TSi hybrid)? That would certainly get the less technically minded scratching their heads!!!

Downsizing is definitely the way forward, I was telling my friend that you can now buy a 1.2 Audi A3 cabriolet & she didnt believe me!

currently a happy owner of a Mitsubishi Shogun Pinin :)

3 November 2010

I think with an approach like this - especially looking at the CO2 figures - VeeDub will get a few enthusiasts on board

3 November 2010

Think all manufacturers will have to head this way in the foreseeable future...VW may be the first to get there though as they were with the original GTI...Hmmm..not always the first to the party enjoys it as much as a later visitor!

To live is to drive

3 November 2010

An idea that obviously makes sense in terms of lowering over all CO2 figures without affecting the car's performance too greatly and it is likely to be the future for performance cars and hot hatches especially.

3 November 2010

Sporty hybrids a new thing?

No.

Lexus GS 450h was launched in 2006. That's six years - a whole model cycle - ahead of what VW may do.

3 November 2010

There is an assumption here that sport = power. Thats not the case. Sporty is down to driver involvement, and so far nearly all hybrids have been autos, removing the most important car/drive interaction.

I am not against hybrids with an auto box, but it should be a choice. More so if a car is to have sporty pretentions.

3 November 2010

ahahah, what a troll!

you call that fat sheep a sporty hybrid?

c`mon, just fastback-shape don`t turn a t*** into a cannonball...

tell to your seasoning boss that adding plastic-kit acessories don`t turn anything into sporty.

and fyi an A5 beats hands-down any GS.

guys, don`t take seriously these PR folks...

3 November 2010

[quote Scott B]

Sporty hybrids a new thing?

No.

Lexus GS 450h was launched in 2006. That's six years - a whole model cycle - ahead of what VW may do.

[/quote]

I'm sure you would have preferred it if this article had mentioned that Lexus has tried and abjectly failed to create performance hybrids. That would definitely do you a huge service, wouldn't it?

And while I've got your attention, could you please stop applying your PR drivel machine to perfectly serviceable words like 'sporty' and sucking every last shred of value and meaning out of them? A GS is many very good things - but sporty it emphatically isn't.

Also, you must realise that you're not doing the respectable image of Lexus any favours by effectively trolling in the company's name. Well done.

R32

3 November 2010

[quote Scott B]

Sporty hybrids a new thing?

[/quote]

Note to Lexus PR machine: The Lexus GS is not sporty. Fact. The only excitment it provides it's driver with is the anticipation of whether it will stop in time or not. That does not make it sporty!

Just how paranoid does a motor manufacturer have to be to permit it's PR staff to attempt to defend it on a car magazine forum? Fairly paranoid I'd say.

3 November 2010

[quote Autocar]“We’re not an experienced hybrid maker like Toyota or Honda, so we don’t just want to come up with what everyone else already has,” said Jetta technical project manager Michael Hinz. “We want to do something unique.”[/quote]

It seems a curious bit of posturing by VW. On the one hand they seem to be claiming that a petrol hybrid aren't really economical, yet goes on to claim their concept petrol hybrid gets substantially better economy than one of their production cars with a 1.4TSI engine and similar performance.

For them then to claim it's a better idea to use their hybrid technology to boost power seems rather odd. If you've already got an expensive engine with both a turbo charger and a supercharger that you want to make go faster, would you really add even more cost and complexity just to get an extra 27BHP from an electric motor? Particularly when they already seem to have worked out how to improve the 1.4TSI by 30BHP in the Polo GTi without bolting on a battery and motor?

Why do they even need to raise the doubts over performance versus economy? If their concept really manages 98g/km and 0-62 in 8s then that sounds a pretty good rival to the Prius to me, and offers both economy and performance. Given how well the Prius has done, the VW ought to fly out the showroom. Why not just produce that rather than start harping on about not being able to have performance and economy? I wonder whether the real story is that VW are struggling to catch up with the established hybrids of Honda and Toyota and actually make the technology work. So they're blowing a bit of a smokescreen of "we're doing hybrid for performance reasons really" to cover it up?

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