Race car maker launches its first ever road car, the Inverter

Race car maker Reynard has launched its first road car: the Inverter.

The Reynard Inverter passed its IVA-approval test for cars produced as one-offs or in very low volume first time, meaning it can now be fitted with number plates and registered for use on the road.

See official pics of the Reynard Inverter

The Indy 500-winning constructor will build the car in both right- and left-hand drive; prices start at £35,000 and it can be supplied in either kit car or turn-key form.

Powering the lightweight 440kg track car is a 180bhp Fireblade engine. The Inverter’s slippery shape was developed in an F1-spec wind tunnel and it’s capable of producing 1200kg of downforce, thanks to its large fixed rear wing. Drivers can sustain more than 3.00g while cornering.

Reynard wants the Inverter to put an end to one-make race series, which it describes as “overpriced monopolies, devoid of engineering innovation, diversity, and creativity”.

Instead it plans the Inverter to be an open source design; it will allow the car and its components' design to be viewed online, so anyone can manufacturer and design their own parts at a lower cost.

Join the debate

Comments
8

12 August 2010

nice, does look like a home grown DIY car. but extremely competent, does what it's meant to do.

good idea for open source too.

the photo looks like it's tiny, and maybe it is.

1200kgs of downforce? thats how much a F1 car makes at about 118mph.

but this is lighter than an f1car.

could be lighter too though which i hope they cater for in design option, single seat with proper aero cover over passenger area, and complete lights removal and wiring which will lose weight and increase aero efficiency and still be road legal.

i demand flexible wings to, if its good for formula 1, its even better for the road where the ride height could be made slightly higher but the wings bend down with downforce loading. win win scenario for flexy wings.

12 August 2010

Specification

reynard is happy to build your car using your choice of components - please ask about compatibility.

2 seater sportscar - track focused with road legal option (IVA)
Designed to 750mc bikesports race regulations, --- US spec SCCA DSR CSR options planned
Weight : 400kg (Race) --- 445kg (Road)
Power: 180bhp (1000cc Fireblade) or 200bhp (1340cc Hayabusa) --- Duratec / Sports 2000 in development
Aero - Max Downforce: 2600lbs (1180kg) --- Best L/D configuration: 5.8:1
Width: 1.5m (minimised for lower drag - ideal for hillclimbs) --- Wheelbase: 2.4m
Top Speed: 135mph (Geared for Fireblade engine)
Tyres: Race Avon F3 Front 13x8 & Rear 13x10 --- Road Toyo Proxes R888 Front 16x7 & Rear 17x9
Bodywork: Carbon Fibre or Glass Fibre. 3 piece upper & full underbody diffuser. Front & Rear wings in Carbon.
Chassis: 55kg Stainless Steel with composite panel stiffeners to 750mc regulations. FIA chassis available on request
Safety: 6 point harnesses, aluminium honeycomb panel front crashbox & 1" side impact panels. Steering column is collapsible Ford Ka to comply with IVA regulations.
Brakes: Front Alcon 2 piston. Rear - billet machined with integral handbrake caliper
Suspension: TIG welded CDS wishbones, Nitron NTR single adjustable shocks, ALL suspension parts non-handed - ie will fit LHS and RHS to reduce spares requirement
Interior: Farringdon Dash/steering wheel. Tillett Seats. Tilton Pedals. Pingel Electronic Gearchange.
Options: Geartronics pneumatic paddle change. AIM steering wheel & logger. DC Electronics raychem wiring loom

..............

video:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_hM01JHDBg&feature=player_embedded#![/yo...

12 August 2010

"Reynard wants the Inverter to put an end to one-make race series, which it describes as “overpriced monopolies, devoid of engineering innovation, diversity, and creativity”"

Is this a thinly-veiled dig at Radical, perchance?

Nice concept, I'm sure it will be well engineered; but come on, this isn't really a road car, is it?!

Love the idea of open source - will be keeping an eye on how this progresses for sure.

12 August 2010

[quote beachland2]i demand flexible wings to, if its good for formula 1, its even better for the road where the ride height could be made slightly higher but the wings bend down with downforce loading. win win scenario for flexy wings. [/quote]

??? explain how this is "even better for the road". At road speeds? The only true wing on this car is on the tail, which I really don't think would benefit from being flexible, would it...

How does raising the ride height but having wings "bend down" make the aero more efficient?

I would suggest you leave track car design to people who know what they're doing. Like Adrian Reynard for example.

12 August 2010

I imagine it was more of a light hearted comment than anything else, but I agree for what it's worth - at road speeds even that rear wing will be doing fairly little

12 August 2010

Looks like loads of fun but that's a very silly name, how do you fancy telling people you drive an inverter?

12 August 2010

[quote uk_supercar_fan]How does raising the ride height but having wings "bend down" make the aero more efficient?[/quote] I am not a designer either but the trick in F1 is that the front wing has to be at least a certain height from the ground. By being flexible when moving the wing drops below this height and creates more down force. The point I think beachland is trying to make is for a road car you would want good clearance at low speed for speed bumps then less at higher speeds for better grip. The new Ferrari has a flexible front wing but I think this is geared to aero and cooling rather than ground clearance. Whether this particular car would benefit from flexible front wings maybe the open source will uncover.

12 August 2010

i know what i'm doing, i just didnt say it very well.

what i meant was, raynard have already raised the car to make it for the road, it would be a lot lower if it was track spec. so what i am saying is that as the car is raised, anyway of making it lower again while at speed is going to increase downforce and performance.

road speed is irelevent, they can design the wings to lower to their maximum at 60/70mph under load. also the ride height of the car itself can be lowered with flexible floor.

there is a front wing see the photos.

the rear wing can also flex to increase downforce at 60mph.

having these systems can make the car have much higher performance at road speeds on the road. and it becomes much more track orientated as well with out the extra work for the driver to manual adjust and swap parts for a track day to make it lower, the car will do the hard work automatically.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Car review
    23 September 2016
    Aston kicks off its ‘second century plan’ with an all-new turbo V12 grand tourer
  • Ford Ka+ 1.2 Ti-VCT 85
    First Drive
    22 September 2016
    A rounded, refined and well-sorted bargain supermini – once you’re used to the confusing role redefinition imposed on the once-cheeky Ka
  •  Maserati Ghibli Diesel
    First Drive
    22 September 2016
    Maserati releases another range of updates for its range best seller, the Ghibli. We've driven the diesel version, but there's little improvement on before
  • Tipo Front
    First Drive
    21 September 2016
    New Fiat Tipo offers impressive space and practicality for a reasonable price. We try the 1.6 diesel on the demanding roads of North Wales
  • Seat Ateca 1.4 TSI 150
    First Drive
    20 September 2016
    The Seat Ateca 1.4 TSI 150 makes perfect sense: it's spacious, tidy to drive for an SUV and cheap to run