The Lexus CT 200h will be capable of 68.9mpg and 94g/km CO2 emissions, the company claims

Lexus’s new hybrid CT 200h will cost from £23,485 and is available to order now.

The Lexus CT 200h will be capable of 68.9mpg and 94g/km CO2 emissions, the company claims.

See Autocar's first drive of the Lexus CT 200h

Three spec levels are available: SE-I, SE-L and SE-L Premier. Entry level spec includes climate control, Bluetooth, 17-inch alloys, push button start and LED daytime running lights.

For £25,200, the SE-L adds heated leather seats and parking sensors to the package.

Top spec SE-L Premier costs £30,635 and includes cruise control, HDD sat nav, rear parking monitor and LED headlights.

Although the Prius power-train has been tweaked to promote smoothness and provide more power in sport mode, 0-60mph takes 10.3sec, making it slower than its obvious rival, the BMW 118d. Top speed is also down on the BMW’s of 130mph at only 112mph.

See all the latest Lexus CT 200h reviews, news and video

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Comments
12

29 October 2010

For this price I rather just buy a Golf GT 2.0 TDI\GTD will be cheaper less ugly looking, give me the same or better MPG and running costs and will be a much nicer place to sit in !

29 October 2010

[quote moe360]and will be a much nicer place to sit in[/quote]

I sat in one at the Paris show. Its so much nicer inside that a Golf, or A3 and 1 series for that matter. But there is no way its a £30,000 car. Even £25,000 for the mid spec car sounds excessive.

29 October 2010

If only they had given it some actual go - i don't even mind the looks to be honest, but the performance apparently on offer is nothing short of pathetic.

Just dont understand it.

jer

29 October 2010

I also like the interior of this and the IS, more high end audio than car. I get a bit mistified when the writers prefer well built but bland design from VW and particularly Mercedes where the HVAC control are from an old Miriva.

Still not enough go or handling for me either on this car.

29 October 2010

Does anyone out there know, if when these hybrid cars are tested by the manufacturer on a rolling road for EU emissions of CO2 and fuel consumption, whether the energy stored in the battery is at exactly the same level after the test as before it? As this car's only source of power is the petrol engine either direct or through its charging of the battery it is vital that the battery energy content before and after testing be the same to give a true fuel consumption reading. Or are the figures only so good because they are fiddled by starting with a fully charged battery and ending the test with a discharged battery? Come on Autocar give us the official answer.

29 October 2010

Unless you specifically want a sub-100g/ km co2 car with an automatic gearbox I see little reason to buy this over a Audi a3 1.6 tdi e or golf bluemotion, which cost about £5000 less and offer the same sort of fuel economy.

29 October 2010

I have driven the car a lot and like it but the pricing is over-ambitious. However the EU sales targets are very small so perhaps the pricing is considered ok - they only want / expect a tiny slice of the market so no need to make it particularly cheap

29 October 2010

Testing for offical Govt MPG and emissions data does include taking battery condition into account - basically a before and after measurement is used to even out the resut. As such, it impossible to "cheat" the test with a hybrid.

Put another way, the results for hybrids are comperable to any petrol or diesel car. How that matches what a driver may get on the road depends on how you drive - and that applies to any and every car. Any number of independent MPG challenges have shown you can match the Govt numbers.

On the recent, two day ALD Automotive/TOTAL Eco 10 MPG Marathon, over nearly 400 miles of motorway and A and B-road driving (i.e.not favourable to hybrid), an Auris Hybrid completed the course with an average 74.3mpg, spot on its official combined cycle figure.

29 October 2010

[quote Scott B]Testing for offical Govt MPG and emissions data does include taking battery condition into account - basically a before and after measurement is used to even out the resut. As such, it impossible to "cheat" the test with a hybrid.[/quote] We then can look forward to a 30% improvement on the mpg of hybrids when they are mated to the more efficient diesel engine.

29 October 2010

[quote Maxycat]We then can look forward to a 30% improvement on the mpg of hybrids when they are mated to the more efficient diesel engine.[/quote] And a few £1000 more on the price. A common rail injection system costs £1000, then there's a Urea after treatment device or a regenerative particulate filter, not to mention the turbo, the intercooler, the stronger engine construction......

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