Facelifted hatch gets all-new trim line-up and auto option for the economy-hunting diesel
Richard Webber
25 February 2016

The refreshed Alfa Romeo Giulietta hatchback has been revealed, and benefits from a light facelift, new trim classifications and the addition of the TCT dual-clutch gearbox as an option for the fuel-sipping 1.6 JTDm engine.

Cosmetic changes on the outside are focused on the nose, where there’s a new honeycomb grille, black bumper inserts and very subtle changes to the headlamp and fog light surrounds - all of which bring the Giulietta closer to the styling of the long-awaited Giulia saloon that’s expected towards the end of the year. Inside, updates include new seats and a matte black dash insert.

There are seven trim levels available on the Giulietta at present: Progression, Distinctive, Exclusive, Sprint, Business, QV Line and Quadrifoglio Verde. All are replaced in the new range, which references Alfa nameplates of days gone by. The entry-level model is now simply called Giulietta, with Super, Tecnica, Speciale and Veloce above it.

All benefit from the newly upgraded Uconnect infotainment system that now includes smartphone integration for online services such as music streaming, news, social media and traffic updates for cars equipped with sat-nav. A leather steering wheel becomes standard, while 16in alloys, Bluetooth, air-con and the Q2 brake-based front differential are carried over from the existing basic kit list.

Super trim adds dual-zone climate control, cruise control, front fog lights and upgraded seats, and an optional Lusso pack adds leather upholstery, aluminium kick plates and a larger infotainment screen (up from 5.0in to 6.5in) with sat-nav.

The old Business Edition trim is replaced by Tecnica to include practical touches such as sat-nav and front and rear parking sensors, while sporty Speciale brings stiffer suspension, Brembo brakes, aggressive exterior styling touches, 18in alloys, sat-nav and interior embellishments such as leather and Alcantara seats and a flat-bottomed steering wheel.

The quickest model, powered by the 237bhp 1750 TB engine from the 4C coupé, becomes the Veloce (Italian for ‘fast’), shedding the Quadrifoglio Verde name that will be reserved for ultra-high-performance models in the Alfa Romeo line-up, such as the 503bhp Giulia super-saloon. The Giulietta Veloce’s kit list is similar to Speciale specification.

While the TCT dual-clutch gearbox will become an option on the 118bhp 1.6 JTDm diesel (it’s already optional on the 168bhp 1.4 MultiAir and standard on the 173bhp 2.0 JTDm and 1750 TB), the drivetrain line-up otherwise remains unaltered. This means there are three diesel engines and four petrols in the range - the other units being the 148bhp 2.0 JTDm and 118bhp and 148bhp MultiAir versions of the 1.4.

The 1.6 JTDm is the Giulietta’s most popular engine choice in the UK. Paired with the existing manual gearbox, it achieves 74.3mpg combined and emits just 99g/km of CO2. The new dual-clutch version matches these figures, but is 0.2sec slower to 62mph at 10.2sec. Steering wheel-mounted paddles are supplied as standard with the TCT gearbox.

The facelifted Giulietta goes on sale on 1 April, with the entry price remaining unchanged at £18,450 for the 118bhp 1.4 petrol in basic Giulietta trim. Pricing for other models is yet to be confirmed, but indications are that adding the TCT gearbox to the 1.6 diesel will cost around £1500, reflecting the premium currently commanded by that transmission.

The refreshed Giulietta is on display at this week's Geneva motor show.

Read our full review on the first generation Alfa Romeo Giulietta

Our Verdict

Alfa Romeo Giulietta
The Giulietta competes in the biggest segment in Europe - rivals include the VW Golf and Ford Focus

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta has its flaws, but its dynamic capabilities and stylish looks are enough to keep it in contention

Join the debate

Comments
10

25 February 2016

Finally its got the grille it always should have had, why oh why didnt they redesign those headlamps ? - They ruin a really good looking car.

25 February 2016
typos1 wrote:

Finally its got the grille it always should have had, why oh why didnt they redesign those headlamps ? - They ruin a really good looking car.

A new grill is fairly cheap to redesign as it's usually just the front bit of plastic (as in this case) with the old fixings. New headlight shape might entail new front bumper, new wings, new bonnet, new fixings, new inner wings etc.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

25 February 2016

They managed to spend hundreds of thousands on new headlamps for the 4C which sells in tiny numbers.

bol

25 February 2016

Much as I don't like the angry look of many new premium cars, I think that on balance I'd probably prefer to drive a cross car than one that looks like it's startled and confused. The Giulietta looks like it's just found itself somewhere unexpectedly dark and scary.

25 February 2016

Lol, looks like its got 2 black eyes to me. It should have had 159 type lights on it from the word go . . . and it wouldnt be that difficult to retro fit them.

25 February 2016

Probably don't want to launch your car on April Fools Day.

Also "new dual-clutch version matches these figures, but is 0.2sec slower to 62mph at 10.2sec.". How is that possible? Is the dual-clutch gearbox rubbish?

25 February 2016

Its strange, cos the exact same gearbox manages to improve acceleration times on the 2.0 JTDm and the 1750.

26 February 2016

I have TCT on my Giulietta and it's very good (with the 1.4 MutiAir). I just wonder if they have given the TCT different ratios to enhance the economy at the expense of a bit of performance

26 February 2016

on here? Who cares about the headlights. It's an Alfa. Thank God there is a company still making cars like these, and not boring Euro boxes!

Andy.

Italian cars, a love/hate relationship

26 February 2016

on here? Who cares about the headlights. It's an Alfa. Thank God there is a company still making cars like these, and not boring Euro boxes!

Andy.

Italian cars, a love/hate relationship

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • 2016 Porsche Macan GTS
    First Drive
    27 July 2016
    Sitting between the S and the Turbo, the Porsche Macan GTS is one of the most entertaining SUVs out there
  • Car review
    27 July 2016
    Sweden guns for Germany’s big-hitters with a new full-sized exec
  • Car review
    27 July 2016
    Facelifted roadster ushers in a new generation of turbo V6 AMGs
  • First Drive
    27 July 2016
    Special-edition Twingo is packed with kit for a reasonable price, but a practicality deficit and a gutless engine leave us feeling cold
  • First Drive
    26 July 2016
    An expensive but entertaining, intriguing and very usable road-going track car whose rarity may eventually underwrite its high price