New Phoenix Architecture is crucial to the firm's future - we look at what will underpin the new 9-3

The Phoenix Architecture that will underpin the 93 is aptly named; indeed, it is so crucial to Saab’s recovery that the firm’s engineering guru, Kjell ac Bergström, has put his retirement on hold for two years to oversee the project into production.

Bergström, who has also worked at Volvo and Fiat-GM, rejoined General Motors-owned Saab in 2003.

He had already outlined his vision for how an independent version of the Swedish brand could work before it severed its ties with the American giant.

The Phoenix Architecture seems to fit in with Bergström’s plan, in which many future components — everything from base engines to door locks — will be bought ‘off the shelf’ from manufacturers who supply parts to other premium car makers.

This policy is a U-turn for Saab, which has often insisted on modifying even the smallest common part to reach its own specifications.

However, the flexible nature of the process means that engines can still be modified in house, and Saab will still be free to carry out its own crash safety tests and introduce its own styling and electronic architectures.

The set-up will also allow Saab to give the 93 complex suspension systems and four-wheel drive.

The essentials of the Phoenix Architecture

Front suspension

For the Phoenix architecture, Saab has a choice of existing suspension systems. It could use the standard-issue MacPherson strut fitted to base versions of the 9-5.

However, MacPherson struts have limitations. They allow more vibration and disturbances from the road through to the driver and are prone to allowing torque steer with powerful engines.

Their construction means that they are also more susceptible to distorting under hard cornering, which leads to much less precise steering response. Many within Saab are now arguing that the Phoenix platform should actually be fitted with the much more sophisticated HiPer Strut.

HiPer Strut

The name is derived from High Performance Strut. This front suspension set-up was designed by Saab engineers for General Motors’ Global Epsilon project.

According to the company, the advanced HiPer Strut offers driving benefits similar to those of a double wishbone layout. “The inclination, length and offset of the kingpin is reduced and the castor angle of the steering increased.

“The result: improved steering quality with a more ‘planted’ feel, as well as enhanced handling and braking characteristics.”

Rear Suspension

Base 9-5s use a four-link independent axle, designed by GM and also used on the Insignia. It’s regarded as a capable design, but Saab also has the option of the much more sophisticated linked H-arm set-up.

Linked H-Arm axle

The linked H-arm was also developed by Saab technicians and is available on both front-drive and all-wheel-drive cars. The company says because it has isolated subframe mountings (unlike the four-link axle), it gives even greater ride comfort, reduces vibration entering the cabin and improves roadholding.

All-wheel drive system

Saab’s XWD (Cross Wheel Drive) system is based around the familiar and quick-acting Haldex 4 clutch, which is mounted on the rear differential. Torque can be transferred front to rear depending on grip levels (using 20 sensors checking information 100 times a second).

The trick aspect is the limited-slip differential on the back axle. Dubbed the eLSD, it can distribute torque between the wheels, meaning the torque can be variably split between all four wheels, matching levels of available grip.

New engines for the 9-3

By assembling its own platform, Saab is free to buy in engines and transmissions from virtually any supplier. One Saab source told Autocar that using an existing GM platform (such as the Astra’s Delta underpinnings) meant that it would probably have to adopt matching GM engines and transmissions.

The new Phoenix Architecture might be built around the new BMW/Mini engines, but it’s likely that Saab will design its own DSG transmission because BMW uses conventional auto ’boxes.

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Comments
15

21 June 2010

Interesting. Mind you, the replacement for the new 9-5 had better be RWD... FWD in something that big is just unacceptable.

21 June 2010

[quote Straight Six Man]Interesting. Mind you, the replacement for the new 9-5 had better be RWD... FWD in something that big is just unacceptable.[/quote]

If it was RWD then it wouldn't be a SAAB, plain and simple. Front-wheel-drive is one of the main characteristics of the brand and also happens to be better suited to the conditions of the home market.

For that same latter reason, Volvo will probably never return to RWD either, as FWD with the option of a Haldex set-up gives the best compromise for the cold winter conditions that all of Scandinavia suffers.

21 June 2010

[quote Straight Six Man]Interesting. Mind you, the replacement for the new 9-5 had better be RWD... FWD in something that big is just unacceptable[/quote] *sigh* Rover rover rover...

21 June 2010

OK colour me confused but didn't Muller confirm just a few weeks ago that the next 9-3 was being built on the existing 9-3's GM epsilon 1 platform which is now already 8 years old. Where does all this 'Saab is working on a new platform — known internally as the ‘Phoenix Architecture’ talk come from?


21 June 2010

The current 9-3 is already a heavily modified Epsilon platform. It's part of the reason why the SAAB is more expensive. GM were unaware that SAAB had modified the car but only found out when they tried to build the Pontiac G6 convertible at their Orion plant and it would fit the 9-3 convertible chassis? So although the current 9-3 shares many GM components it's interchangeable with any other model in the GM range.

The Original name for this Phoenix Architecture was I-P which evolves the current 9-3 platform further, making it unique to SAAB. The outcome will be a vehicle with far superior handling to the current version which already handles better than any other similar based GM vehicle.

What does this all mean? personally I believe the current 9-3 isn't straight derivative of a Vectra. Which is quite a different story to VAG's SEAT Ibiza, VW Polo and Audi A1. there's big differences between these 3 vehicles but all can be build from the same chassis. That's something you can't do with the current 9-3 and the next generation will create a completely new platform.

21 June 2010

“The result: improved steering quality with a more ‘planted’ feel, as well as enhanced handling and braking characteristics.”

Porsche 911 and rally cars use them do they not feel planted nor have "enhanced handling"?

great commentary!!!

21 June 2010

[quote theonlydt][quote Straight Six Man]Interesting. Mind you, the replacement for the new 9-5 had better be RWD... FWD in something that big is just unacceptable[/quote] *sigh* Rover rover rover...[/quote]

Oh dear, we're at it again. I'm just pointing out, as any sane individual would, that FWD in something powerful enough to propel 1700-1900kg of big car is just idiotic. I think, if not RWD, Saab needs to go all-AWD, like Subaru.

21 June 2010

[quote Volvophile]

[quote Straight Six Man]Interesting. Mind you, the replacement for the new 9-5 had better be RWD... FWD in something that big is just unacceptable.[/quote]

If it was RWD then it wouldn't be a SAAB, plain and simple. Front-wheel-drive is one of the main characteristics of the brand and also happens to be better suited to the conditions of the home market.

For that same latter reason, Volvo will probably never return to RWD either, as FWD with the option of a Haldex set-up gives the best compromise for the cold winter conditions that all of Scandinavia suffers.

[/quote]

So that's why the Swedish stuck with RWD for so many decades? With studded tyres and/or chains, it's not a big deal. I think, though, as RWD would clearly be a betrayal of Saab brand principles, that they need just to go for a Subaru-style all-AWD lineup. Go rallying with them, too. Oh, and can we please, please, please have one RWD Saab in the form of a modern Sonett? Perhaps buy the old Pontiac Solstice platform off GM to do it on...

21 June 2010

[quote Straight Six Man]the Swedish[/quote]

I presume by this you mean 'Volvo'. We're talking about Saab here and they have been intrinsically FWD for decades, why would they want to be another BMW-clone?

They've got 4WD variants, as you say. People buy Saabs for very different reasons to those who buy RWD saloons. And wasn't the Sonnet FWD?


21 June 2010

SAAB should never go RWD. It's never been a part of their heritage and shouldn't be a part of it for the future. AWD; yes and since 2008 SAAB has joined the AWD arena with a very capable system that is superior to Audi's, so 1 up to SAAB on that front. I know BMW are venturing into FWD but that doesn't mean it's right however; BMW haven't always done RWD. SAAB on the other hand have never done RWD for their road cars. SAAB are rebuilding their brand identity and the best place to start is with their heritage. Which means. FWD, Aerodynamic, Turbo performance and fuel efficient.

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