From £15,920

Facelifted Megane remains a hard sell, but makes a refreshingly sporty fleet car

Our Verdict

Renault Megane

The Renault Megane looks bland, and it's not that good to drive either

What is it?

One of the more interesting members of the streamlined, rationalised 2012 Renault Megane range: the dCI 110 GT Line. It’s not a ‘retail’ car: not a big-hitting performance hatch or an aspirational status symbol. It’s a frugal, pragmatic fleet car with a difference, which proves that this easily overlooked French five-door still has something to offer, in a market segment that many thought had developed way beyond it.

The facelifted 2012 Megane has only just arrived in the UK, and this is our first shot in a right-hand driver. The right-hand driver in question is powered by Renault-Nissan’s unusually small 1.5-litre turbodiesel engine, as a result of which Renault claims the kind of economy and CO2 figures to grab any fleet manager’s attention: a combined 80.7mpg, and 90g/km – both good enough to easily shade the vitals of VW’s defining Golf Bluemotion.

In value-added GT Line trim, the car’s also loaded with standard specification. £21,300 buys you 17in alloy wheels, cruise control, sat nav, a reversing camera, leather-upholstered primary controls, and Bluetooth and USB connectivity in this case – something else that should go down well in the aforementioned company car department.

But this is the bit to pique the driver’s interest. Look past the modest 108bhp and 177lb ft power and torque outputs of this car, and back to the standard equipment list. You’ll find GT Line RenaultSport sports seats on it, sports bumpers, and more importantly, sports suspension: additions which hint at the split personality that marks this car out among capable but worthy rivals.

What's it like?

A bit underwhelming at first. Renault’s facelift hasn’t added the material quality or sparkle to the Megane’s cabin design that would make it more of a match for Ford’s modern, techy-looking Focus, VW’s meticulous Golf, or even Hyundai’s ever-improving i30. Despite some new trims, the Megane’s dashboard looks and feels plain and ordinary, and remains something of an ergonomic disappointment too, with high-mounted seats, shallow footwells and switchgear scattered about willy-nilly. But, at least it’s practical. And when you start the Megane’s engine, you’ll find out it’s quiet and mechanically well-mannered, too.

Outright performance isn’t this car’s strongest suit, but it’s competitive. Six ratios in the car’s manual gearbox makes a difference (the VW Group’s comparable Bluemotion / Greenline / Ecomotive models only get five), and the Megane is drivable and brisk enough to outpunch the traffic when called upon. Throttle response isn’t great, but it’s a problem you can drive around with familiarity during most day to day driving. 

The car’s frugal, of course: not quite 80mpg frugal, but 60-to-the-gallon is within easy reach on a mixed cruise. A tall top gear even makes the car feel at home on the motorway, which is something you can’t always say of sub-100g offerings.

But what ‘s refreshing about the car is its handling. You couldn’t really call a Ford Focus 1.6 TDCi an enthusiast’s car, nor most other low-emissions, fleet-favoured hatchbacks, but this Megane almost qualifies. Its damping and body control is of a warm-hatch order, its steering informative and quite confidence-inspiring. 

The car’s ContiSport Contact 3 tyres don’t provide performance car levels of grip, but they come surprisingly close. The car’s corners keenly and with quick, clean responses; it has pleasing cornering balance, too. It’s not a fast car, but a poised and decently agile one: simply, it proves that sub-100g diesels can handle.

Should I buy one?

No. But if your employer’s going to lease one on your behalf and you’re limited to a choice between the most frugal cars on the market, you could do an awful lot worse.

It’s debatable whether a 108bhp hatchback needs a chassis like this; a more comfort-oriented tune will make better sense for the majority. But the Megane GT Line comes as welcome relief from the beige dynamic mainstream, and if you like your company car with a little bit of sporting verve, it easily deserves consideration.

Renault Megane 1.5 dCi 110 GT Line

Price: £21,300; 0-62mph: 12.1sec; Top speed: 118mph; Economy: 80.7mpg; Co2: 90g/km; Kerbweight: 1215kg; Engine type, cc: 4cyls in line, 1461cc, turbodiesel; Power: 108bhp at 4000rpm; Torque: 177lb ft at 1750rpm; Gearbox: 6-spd manual

Join the debate

Comments
10

14 June 2012

£21,300 for a car that takes over 12 sceonds to get to 60.  Even if you did get 60 to the gallon it would take years to claw back the money against a 125 hp Focus Titanium (even the highest spec Titanium X is several hundred pounds cheaper).

 And you wouldn't have to listen to the usual Diesel rattle!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

14 June 2012

As the text explains, and much like the Focus, there'll be very few private buyers for this car so querying the price isn't really an issue.

Even if you were a private buyer you wouldn't pay anything like the ticket price anyway.

 


14 June 2012

bomb wrote:

As the text explains, and much like the Focus, there'll be very few private buyers for this car so querying the price isn't really an issue.

Even if you were a private buyer you wouldn't pay anything like the ticket price anyway.

In which case that shouldn't try to over price it.  Besides not all private buyers want to or feel confident enough to walk into a show room and haggle with a salesman. 

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

14 June 2012

can nver go by list price really - easily get £3k off this if you are a private buyer.

Doesn't sound bad for a eco car - although I really haven't seen many of these meganes around.

14 June 2012

... but it looks alright.

If in 18 months time I was a young lad with £10k to spend... it's a nice looking car and will likely be cheap to buy and run.

No bad. 

14 June 2012

It remains a mystery to me why its cars aimed at fleets that get the biggest discounts, when it means the poor soul who ends up driving the car pays tax on an artificilly high list price. Why not just be honest and knock £3,000 or £4,000 off the list and try and make the car look a little more appealing to private punters too.

As for the car, if you have to have a sub 100g/km car this is probably the pick. But if a fleet manager told me i had to have an eco special i would know they wanted me to leave, but didnt have the guts to chuck me out.

14 June 2012

You definitely need a good chassis with an economy minded diesel. Holding a steady speed is key for saving fuel and with all that turbo lag you don't want to be slowing down for every bend.

15 June 2012

Thanks a lot for share so nice information because its a didective approch.[url=http://www.motorformula.com.au]in car DVD[/url]

 

18 June 2012

I have one of these coupes, pre-facelift without LED lights, in this lovely colour and with the dual clutch gearbox.

I've done 40K KM in the last 16 Months.

It's pretty, it's reliable, it's economic and handles very nicely.

1200km per tank is easy enough to achieve and the new one is even easier on fuel than my one.

the car isn't very powerful and I'm thankful I have the EDC box so that I don't have to change gears to keep it within the very narrow powerband.

It is very refined for the class it is in and very quiet on the autobahn at 150 to 160km.

I'm thankful for the good handling because you need to carry your speed in to and out of corners to keep momentum due to the lack of power.

It is a company car and I bought it because I was incentivised to buy an eco-friendly car and this was the nicest sub 120g/km diesel auto three door I could find this time last year with the best specification coming as standard.  I was looking at 1series, A1s and A3s, C30s but they had nothing in them, were expensive and extras get taxed heavily

I've travelled across europe in it and it has served me well.  16 months on I'd still have problems finding something else which is as good a package when the parameters of my company car scheme and taxation are considered.

I couldn't care less about depreciation as I hand the car back at the end of the lease period.

In fact if it depreciates heavily then I could consider purchasing it at a nice low price after the lease but I'm still distrustful of complicated diesels as they get older and lease package is just too convenient not to enroll again.

The article is spot on with regard to the reasons why this is an interesting car for a lot of people.

 

18 June 2012

80mpg is pretty good, and I think the car looks terrific! It is expensive, but being a Renault, you could get a good discount. Most 'buyers' won't be paying anyway...

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lexus LC500
    Car review
    20 October 2017
    Futuristic Lexus LC coupé mixes the latest technology with an old-school atmospheric V8
  • Maserati Levante S GranSport
    First Drive
    20 October 2017
    Get ready to trade in your diesels: Maserati’s luxury SUV finally gets the engine it’s always needed
  • Jaguar XF Sportbrake TDV6
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The handsome Jaguar XF Sportbrake exhibits all the hallmarks that makes the saloon great, and with the silky smooth diesel V6 makes it a compelling choice
  • Volkswagen T-Roc TDI
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    Volkswagen's new compact crossover has the looks, the engineering and the build quality to be a resounding success, but not with this diesel engine
  • BMW M550i
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The all-paw M550i is a fast, effortless mile-muncher, but there's a reason why it won't be sold in the UK