From £70,8958
Price, fuel economy, range and depreciation

For the level of performance the Nissan GT-R offers, this is a remarkably affordable supercar – cheap even. Once you’ve bought the car, though, running costs are more on a par with supercar rivals.

You’ll be visiting your specialist GT-R dealer for maintenance every 6000 miles and visiting a filling station even more often – you’ll struggle to get 20mpg even of you drive gently, while a track day will have you hoping for a nearby service station on the way home. As for the GT-R’s CO2 output, it’s best to keep that quiet and take the tax bills on the chin.

For the level of performance the Nissan GT-R offers, this is a remarkably affordable supercar

You do get a three-year/60,000-mile warranty, although GT-Rs have an excellent reliability record – as long as they’re cared for. Perhaps surprisingly given the number of grey imports floating around, GT-Rs are reasonable investments: residual values will fall less quickly, and from a lower price, than supercars of comparable performance and shouldn’t be too far out of kilter with similar-priced coupés.

As well as the engineering techno feast on board, you also get a fair smattering of luxury gizmos, too. The 2012 model year cars with 523bhp come with all the bells, whistles and even metallic paint – a bizarrely expensive cost option on the other models.

Unfortunately, excellent though the Track Pack is, it struggles to justify the £10k premium over a standard GT-R. The upgrades only exact a very slight improvement on a fantastic package for a significant premium.

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