SVO received a pretty good base point for the SVR’s interior, so it hasn’t taken a huge amount of work to make a Range Rover Sport’s cabin feel appropriate for a car costing in excess of £100,000. Material quality, fit and finish are all pretty much first rate.

The resolution on some of the digital touchscreen’s graphics and the head-up display is bettered by that of some of the German car makers, but even the standard Sport counters with a sense of rare opulence inside.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Deep doors that close over the sill mean you're less likely to get a wet or dirty leg when you climb in or out

For the SVR, the differences are slight but sufficient to give the Sport another lift – albeit one aimed squarely at those looking for performance cues rather than luxury ones. They get them in the deeply sculpted shapes of the seats, which scream ‘sporty’ in a way that’s slightly out of kilter with the fact that you’re looking horizontally across at them, not down on them, when you open the door.

Land Rover’s high-set driving position is unchanged by buckets that, ultimately, look more supportive than they are. There’s no denying that the driving position remains strong, however, with plenty of room for occupants both front and rear. The steering column electrically adjusts through a vast range and the seats have 16-way adjustment.

Sporty chairs aren’t just reserved for front-seat occupants either. Open the back door and you’ll find rear passengers get the same look to their chairs, right down to the holes for harnesses that will never be fitted. A fifth seat remains, but Land Rover calls it ‘occasional’. We’d like to be in it even less frequently than that.

However, the rear seatbacks still split 60/40 and fold, so, discomfort of the fifth seat aside, the car remains as practical as ever. The boot is large – 489 litres in capacity with the seats up, rising to 1761 litres with them folded.

As for the standard equipment, the SVR is certainly well-endowed. It basically has all the bits fitted to a Range Rover Sport Autobiography Dynamic plus darken headlights, exterior gloss black trim, a specially-made rear spoiler, a quad-exhaust system, an aggressive bodykit, blue Brembo brakes, heated seats all round and perforated Oxford leather upholstery.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Top 5 Sports SUVs

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Land Rover range

Driven this week

  • BMW 220d Convertible M Sport 2017 review
    First Drive
    26 July 2017
    The 2 Series range receives a light facelift, enhancing its exterior and interior look, improving infotainment and adding more standard kit
  • Renault Captur Dynamique S Nav dCI 110
    First Drive
    26 July 2017
    To keep pace with rivals in this increasingly competitive category, Renault's popular compact crossover has had a mild refresh both inside and out
  • Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
    First Drive
    25 July 2017
    New top-of-the-line Porsche hybrid, though fast and flexible, is simply too heavy to strike the same sweet sporting compromise as its siblings
  • Caterham Seven 420R Donington Edition
    First Drive
    25 July 2017
    Limited-edition road-legal Caterham track car is a superbly enthralling drive, with enough creature comforts to be used on the road as well. Even more addictive than most of its rangemates
  • McLaren 570S Spider
    First Drive
    25 July 2017
    McLaren has created its most attainable drop-top by removing the roof from the 570S coupé, but none of the car's talent has come away with it