This is arguably the most important category in this particular review, because above all else it is interior space and flexibility that the Kia Venga promises. And in terms of pure centimetres it delivers. Up front there is a good range of driving positions, with a height-adjustable seat plus steering reach and rake movement being standard on all trim levels.  

There is also an impressive array of cubbyholes of varying sizes, a number of which nestle between the front seats and which will collectively swallow a remarkable amount. The arrangement is not particularly attractive but it is at least functional.     

Vicky Parrott

Deputy reviews editor
The only disappointment with the Venga’s cabin is that its design provides little in the way of excitement

But it is in the rear that the Venga impresses most. The rear seats are split and both recline and slide. We doubt the recline function will be of great benefit, but the ability to trade boot space for leg room is useful. The Venga’s high roofline ensures plenty of head room, too.

Further back, the boot is usefully uniform in shape and size. With the rear seats fully back it has a capacity of 444 litres, which is more than in a Honda Jazz, Skoda Yeti or Nissan Note, if not quite as much as the Citroën C3 Picasso

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An underfloor storage area, divided to keep small items secure, adds a further 126 litres. Lower the rear seats – an easy operation that doesn’t require the headrests to be removed – and the seats fold flat to the boot floor. While there is nothing in the Venga’s operation that rewrites the rulebook, what it does it does well.  

The only disappointment with the Venga’s cabin is that for its functionality and ease of operation, its design provides little in the way of excitement. With the exception of the indicator stalks, which look like relics of Kia’s past, material quality is passable, but like the exterior the overall ambience is uninspiring.

On the equipment front, there are six trims to choose from - 1, 1 Air, SR7, 2, 3 and 4. Entry-level models get 15in steel wheels, heated door mirrors, hill start assist, front armrests, and USB and Bluetooth connectivity, while upgrading to 1 Air adds the convenience of air conditioning. 

The limited edition SR7 models include 16in alloy wheels, rear parking sensors, vanity mirrors, electric windows, automatic headlights and privacy glass, while going up to the level 2 trim adds electrically adjustable, heated and folding door mirrors.

The mid-range 3 trim adds a part leather upholstery, cruise control, heated front seats, climate control and cooled glovebox, and Kia's 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system complete with sat nav and a reversing camera, while the range-topping 4 comes with a panoramic sunroof, heated steering wheel and keyless start.

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