We weren’t expecting too much of the Orlando before it reached us. Chevrolet still has work to do in the UK to convince the buying public that its vehicles are up to European standards, and we don’t think it’s unfair to say that the Orlando is the first that truly is.

The Orlando has a thoughtful and appealingly well-finished interior. There’s a decent amount of space in the middle row and, although they don’t do any especially clever tricks, they’re simple enough to fold out of the way if you want your Orlando in full ‘van mode’. That square shape ensures plenty of luggage space and helps to provide decent enough space for taller kids in the third row.

A surprisingly capable car at an unsurprisingly competitive price

Equipment on the LS models isn’t exactly lavish, but you get all you need on LT and LTZ models with the added bonus of a five-year warranty. And the Orlando comfortably undercuts rivals. What’s is impressive, though, is the thoughtfulness of the dash, especially the hidden compartment for MP3 players and phones. Ergonomics are good, although the stereo is a little fussy, and the general ambience is better than you might expect for what is still a budget-priced MPV.

The Orlando also has noise levels that are well within the limits of acceptability (in the diesels, at least), and it supplies a driving experience that is refined as well as, at times, engaging and borderline entertaining.

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Niggles? Surprisingly few. Some rivals have more innovative seating arrangements and economy is not the Orlando’s strongest point, but neither is a major issue.

The Orlando is an utterly recommendable car.

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