The Flying Spur’s £168,300 asking price is the usual salty-tasting departure point for ownership of this car. Even a brief flirtation with the options list can see you parting with a sum inflated close to £200,000.

Our test car rode on standard 21in alloys and featured the entry-level audio system but, even so, it still had £26,645 worth of options fitted. These included the £4770 Bentley Rotating Display and the £9535 Mulliner Driving Specification.

Limos still don’t retain value like other high-end cars, says CAP. Flying Spur and Ghost show similar performance; Maybach shocking.

Still, when you consider the fact that it’s highly unlikely that the next-generation Ghost will be priced below the £200,000 mark, the Flying Spur certainly doesn’t seem particularly expensive, much as ‘value’ may be a misplaced term in connection with cars such as these.

Fuel consumption isn’t quite as ‘inflated’ as you might expect it to be, either. The Flying Spur averaged 22.6mpg in our hands and returned a touring economy figure of 32.5mpg – a very good innings indeed for a 2.5-tonne, 626bhp, 12-cylinder luxo-barge.

What Car? New car buyer marketplace - Bentley Flying Spur

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