Five days in France give the Discovery Sport's all-round capabilities a real workout
20 October 2016

I finally managed to borrow the Discovery Sport for a five-day trip to France.

I say ‘finally’ because on the Autocar test fleet, it seems to be the equivalent of a star quarterback that the rest of the team turn to when they want a long-distance play. With this kind of reputation, I was intrigued to see if the Sport delivered as an all-round player – and it did, for the most part.

Where it excelled was, predictably, the motorway. The smooth highspeed ride combined with virtually no wi nd or road roar made for a very relaxing journey. The nine-speed auto ’box also did a good job, with mainly seamless shifts, although I did experience some hesitancy when pulling out at roundabouts.

While winding my way through the Pas de Calais region to Hesdin, I had plenty of time to try the infotainment system. The large, centrally mounted colour touchscreen was very easy to read at a glance, but a few of the icons were a little on the small side to hit accurately when you’re driving along. Most functions were easy to find, although some were not immediately obvious and required too many button presses to achieve the desired outcome. Changing the radio station was a needlessly time-consuming affair, for example. The practically flawless Bluetooth audio streaming was a boon, though.

Off the autoroute, near my mother’s house in La Loge, there is a wickedly tempting set of long, flowing S-bends up a steep hill through the Hesdin forest. As expected, the Discovery Sport suffered from a fair bit of body lean, but it was surprising just how much grip was available and it felt pretty composed by SUV standards.

What I loved the most, though, was just how much stuff you could cram into the car. The powered tailgate also proved very useful with my arms full of wine boxes after a local supermarché run. The ultimate test, however, was if my mum’s dogs liked the boot. They did. They found it easy to jump in and had plenty of space. In fact, I think we could have got the whole family in there if we’d tried.

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY SPORT TD4 180 HSE AUTO

List price £39,400 Price as tested £42,222 Economy 32.7mpg Faults None Expenses 4.5 litres of Adblue £31 Last seen 14.9.16

Read our previous reports:

AdBlue top up

A talented all-rounder

Practical test

Comfortable cruising

First report

Our Verdict

The Land Rover Discovery Sport
The new Land Rover Discovery Sport is the successor to the Freelander

The Freelander's replacement goes big on prettiness and packaging, and as a result becomes the class leader

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Comments
11

20 October 2016
miles do you get from £31 of Adblue? We could call it MPAD

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

20 October 2016
Mpg a bit low isn't it - I hope that wasn't the overall figure for the trip in france, and is the cars use overall. Considering I get 550 - 600 miles out of 50 litres in my hum drum 11 plate astra 2.0 cdti - I woould expect more from a car with 9 gears to aid mpg, all be it a suv vehicle.

I have read about 8000 miles to adblue but it depends on driving - some cars if all around town only get it to about 6000 miles.

20 October 2016
Lowish mpg is a factor of a modern auto SUV, even diesel. They're still bluff, heavy vehicles and any temptation to use power and torque kills your mileage. One of the reasons we switched back to an estate. We got a genuine 47 mpg with a roof box on cogging it through France this summer in the A6 Avant. I'd agree with gazza5 on the adblue, our previous car with 12l tank managed about that mileage before needing a top up.


20 October 2016
bomb wrote:

Lowish mpg is a factor of a modern auto SUV, even diesel. They're still bluff, heavy vehicles and any temptation to use power and torque kills your mileage. One of the reasons we switched back to an estate. We got a genuine 47 mpg with a roof box on cogging it through France this summer in the A6 Avant. I'd agree with gazza5 on the adblue, our previous car with 12l tank managed about that mileage before needing a top up.

This isn't much better than the santa fe we had in usa - that was a 2.4 litre petrol auro with air con on all the time and short stop start journeys down international drive, and long journey to busch gardens we averaged 24 US MPG which equates to approx 28 mpg. Admittedly I didn't drive quick, and it was on eco setting.

20 October 2016
Your absolutely correct, Bomb. But - and I think it is an important 'but', my Disco Sport gets more per mile that my mothers Mini Cooper. I get 35ish, and my mother gets 30ish. The official figures for most cars are way way out and real world figures like those quoted above are typical.

20 October 2016
Funny, we had a look at one of these and for a family of 5 it just wasn't big enough and the two rear seats were a joke . I'd agree a conventional estate would suit most people for a whole host of reasons a lot better for most of the time .

20 October 2016
Sundym wrote:

Funny, we had a look at one of these and for a family of 5 it just wasn't big enough and the two rear seats were a joke . I'd agree a conventional estate would suit most people for a whole host of reasons a lot better for most of the time .

Oh the poor souls, Sundym. Ive seen plenty of 5-member families cope with a Ford Fiesta or VW Polo. Fancy having to squeeze into a Disco Sport - or maybe an X3... Perish the thought.

20 October 2016
The fuel consumption of this new Ingenium unit seems to be a real weakness. Even the lighter and more aerodynamic XE seems to barely manage 40 mpg. Very poor, really.

20 October 2016
In comparison to what? My fathers 320 efficient Dynamics gets in the high 30s, and if he cruises at 90 on the motorway, low to mid 30s. Perhaps he is just an inefficient driver, but my instinct is that he is typical.

20 October 2016
Having driven 2,000 miles so far in a F-Pace 4WD Auto with the new Ingenium engine, I have averaged 40mpg, which given that most of these miles are on a short hilly cross country commute, I consider to be pretty good. Best MPG so far achieved is 55mpg. Where and how you drive has so much impact, it can be very hard to draw comparisons. It is however a pity the above report did not give an indication of the MPG achieved for the trip.

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