Saloon will be unveiled in Germany on 23 November
10 November 2009

BMW has released an official teaser image of its new 5-series saloon, ahead of the car’s official unveiling later this month.

The teaser silhouette has been created by using BMW’s kinetic sculpture from its museum in Munich. The picture gives little away about the new 5-series’ styling, but it does hint at the firm’s traditional kinked C-pillar.

New BMW 5-series spiedNext BMW M5: full detailsBMW 5-series Touring spied

Lightly-disguised 5-series saloon and estate models have been spied in recent weeks as the firm enters the final stages of development of the car. Styling will be much more conservative than the current model, but it will feature a larger version of the firm’s trademark kidney front grille.

It will share its platform with the recently-launched BMW 5-series GT, which itself uses a chopped down 7-series platform. BMW will apply much of what it has learned developing the ride and handling of the GT into the 5-series.

The car will be slightly larger than the outgoing model but thanks to weight-saving measures it should be no heavier. However, BMW has abandoned its use of lightweight aluminium on key parts of the car, opting instead for an all-steel arrangement.

BMW’s M division has already started work on the next-generation M5, which will feature turbocharging for the first time.

It will use the firm’s new twin-turbo V8 seen in the X5 M and X6 M and the new M5 will continue the car’s tradition of being more powerful than the one it replaces. Despite this, it will still be more fuel efficient, with reduced emissions.

Little is known at this stage about the new 5-series Touring, but like the saloon, it will be longer, wider and bigger inside than the car it replaces. The boot space is likely to be increased from the maximum 1650 litres in the current car, but it is unlikely to grow beyond the 1950 litres of its biggest rival, the new Mercedes E-class estate.

There will be new codenames for the 2010 5-series: F10 for the saloon, F11 for Touring, F10M for the M5 and F07 for the Gran Turismo.

BMW will launch the car live online on 23 November at 7pm GMT.

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Comments
10

10 November 2009

It's a BMW. We know what it's going to look like. What's the point of a teaser?

10 November 2009

The outline of the roof would point towards a fastback design, which is interesting. I wander if everyone will think this looks like a Lexus like people did when the XF first appeared...

10 November 2009

They are teasing us because (hopefully) it will look a damn sight better than their recent efforts - X1, X6, 5GT et al ...

10 November 2009

A turbocharged M5 : vulgar!!!!

10 November 2009

Its that time again! After 6 years of reigning the class the XF and E Class have finally surpassed the 5 series. meanwhile the A6 and the Lexus are still catching up. What happens new 5 series straight back to top of the class. This will 4th or 5th time this cycle has occurred. The teaser shows familiarity after all the 5 still looks fresh. Just hope they haven't copied those creases on the rear wings as per Mercedes.

10 November 2009

[quote david RS]

A turbocharged M5 : vulgar!!!!

[/quote]

Why?

11 November 2009

[quote Overdrive] A turbocharged M5 : vulgar!!!![/quote] [quote Overdrive]Why?[/quote]

That will be because they're a traditionalist, with idea's set in stone as to what an M5 should be and unable to adjust to a changing world.

If they're a true traditionalist then they should have been in mourning when the E39 V8 M5 came out because it was not a straight six.

And as for a V10, technically there should be no traditionalists left as they should have all slashed their wrists to pre-empt the end of the world.

To us realists out there, with modern emission demands now required, we realise that turbo charging is the future for this type of car and we can only salivate at the prospects as to the tuning potential of a turbo charged M5.

Of course, were the M5 to be a turbo charged straight six, the traditionalists heads would automatically explode while trying to assess wether it's a "real" M5 because it's a straight six again or "not a real M5" because of the turbo.

12 November 2009

You’re right 4rephill.

Yes, I had trouble with the end of the 6-cylinders M5. I shed a tear...

I recognize the performances of the turbocharged engines. They have made great progress in response and consumption.

But, if we seek the real efficiency, we must then go to the Diesel.
So long live the M5 Diesel if you want to play with the objectivity! Anyway, M makes SUV, turbo, 4 wheel drive, automatic cars. So the best M3 or M5 would be Diesel with CVT transmissions. I think you're too traditionalist to encourage M cars with gasoline engines.

What I like is the diversity. BMW, M, or Ferrari make fantactic n-aspirated engines.
What counts
also in performance is the art and the way to get there.
Nothing is the response, the agreement on a wide speeds range, and the sound of a n-a.engine.
They are the noblest engines.

Other manufacturers make good turbo engines if you like turbocharged engines.

You know the fans of watches prefer the mechanical watches wich are always less accurate than a £ 5 quartz one...

12 November 2009

[quote 4rephill]

That will be because they're a traditionalist, with idea's set in stone as to what an M5 should be and unable to adjust to a changing world.

If they're a true traditionalist then they should have been in mourning when the E39 V8 M5 came out because it was not a straight six.

And as for a V10, technically there should be no traditionalists left as they should have all slashed their wrists to pre-empt the end of the world.

To us realists out there, with modern emission demands now required, we realise that turbo charging is the future for this type of car and we can only salivate at the prospects as to the tuning potential of a turbo charged M5.

Of course, were the M5 to be a turbo charged straight six, the traditionalists heads would automatically explode while trying to assess wether it's a "real" M5 because it's a straight six again or "not a real M5" because of the turbo.

[/quote]

very well said. Some just dont want to see change for the fun of it .

judging by the current 547bhp 4.4 twin-turbo V8 fitted to the X6 ican honestly say i cant wait for the next M5 bring on Twin-Turbo.


12 November 2009

[quote TurboDiesel]judging by the current 547bhp 4.4 twin-turbo V8 fitted to the X6 ican honestly say i cant wait for the next M5 bring on Twin-Turbo.[/quote]

I have spent some time with this engine now in both the X6M and X5M, it is a fine pece of work, but I would not suggest that it is particularly entertaining. After some initial amusement value I have been left a bit cold by it all and I am hoping that they make it more entertaining in the M5. The next M5'll be a good car no doubt, but I will miss the hard revving 12mpg V10 unless they can insert some more magic into the V8.

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