Tracked telematics data in a Tesla Model X has caught out an owner trying to blame the Autopilot system for user error
10 June 2016

A Tesla Model X crash in the US, blamed by the owner on a faulty Autopilot system, has been debunked using telematics data logged by the vehicle.

The Model X sports a semi-autonomous feature, Autopilot, that allows the car to accelerate, brake and steer on its own, using sensors to monitor the road ahead. When his vehicle crashed into a building in Irvine, California, owner Puzant Ozbag claimed on a Tesla forum that the car accelerated on its own as his wife was trying to park it. He said that the car’s Autopilot system must have been involved.

But an investigation by Tesla has suggested that the car was in fully manual mode when the accident happened.

In a statement, Tesla said: “Data shows that the vehicle was traveling at 6mph when the accelerator pedal was abruptly increased to 100 percent … Consistent with the driver’s actions, the vehicle applied torque and accelerated as instructed.” 

Tesla is relatively unusual in the amount of data it collects from its cars, but the practice is likely to increase among manufacturers, especially as autonomous driving becomes more popular. With vehicle connectivity increasing all the time, car makers are keen to get as much data as possible, both for the development of autonomous systems and for other opportunities, such as insurance deals that offer discounts for proven safe driving.

The company recently announced that it will charge Model 3 owners for use of its Superchargers, which are free for owners of the more expensive Model S and Model X cars.

Phill Tromans

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Comments
16

10 June 2016
Big brother's definitely here in this instance. Without the telemetric feedback, Tesla would have shouldered the blame for that one, possibly resulting in loss of sales, confidence and equity in the brand. Tesla should
sue his ass for attempted fraud!!!

bol

10 June 2016
That is all

11 June 2016
bol wrote:

That is all

What a stupid comment.

Citroëniste.

11 June 2016
bol wrote:

That is all

What a stupid comment.

Citroëniste.

10 June 2016
If you recall (pun intended) all the people who tried to blame Toyota for their vehicles crashing a few years ago - same out come. It was actually driver error, but of course that report was 1 year later after the damage had been done (on a Japanese company by US media....) Just google cnn toyota final nasa report

 

 

 

11 June 2016
Another driver said, the same principle happened twice. Perhaps the Model X driver activated the TACC or Autopilot unintended and the system tried to accelerate to the pre-adjusted speed?
The telemetric feedback is worthless, because Tesla is the only one, who has access and the Model X owners has no possibility, protecting themselves against manipulation. ---

Unintended acceleration right after setting autopilot while stopped - forums teslamotors -
Submitted by drcamilo.ortiz on June 9, 2016

11 June 2016
Surely the telematics would be able to differentiate between the autopilot 'accelerating' and the throttle pedal physically moving from 0-100% travel?
If so, I'd assume its very simply driver error and therefore 'case closed'?

11 June 2016
Wife was trying to park it, my money is on it being a stupid shoes incident. IF you don't like the idea of cars spying on you then you need to vote Leave, the EU intends all cars to have tracking devices and connectivity to monitor it by law in the coming years.

11 June 2016
Before the Court the telematics are worth nothing, Tesla can say whatever they like. No one is in the position to verify their claims.

11 June 2016
I'm sure that telemetric data from vehicles including insurance black box info has been used to convict motorists if the police deem it necessary (speeding). Personally, I wouldn't take someone's word for it that such information is inadmissible in a court of law. I'd try and obey the law. After all, better to be safe than sorry.

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