Ultra-compact unit is designed as a cost-effective electrification option for low-volume manufacturers
Felix Page Autocar writer
17 October 2019

Swindon Powertrain, the company behind the E-Classic electric Mini, is developing a ‘crate’ powertrain for manufacturers to electrify low-volume models. 

The 107bhp unit will facilitate the switch to electrification, the firm says, for “manufacturers currently frustrated by the lack of compact, high-power EV systems available to buy in low volumes”. 

The powertrain is being developed in partnership with electric motor manufacturer iNetic and engineering firm Code, with funding coming from the Niche Vehicle Network, a body that supports more than 900 of Britain’s lowest-volume automotive production and engineering companies. 

The unit is described as ‘turnkey’, meaning it's ready for installation straight from the box, and is claimed to offer the highest power-to-volume ratio on the market. 

Primary intended uses for the new motor include sports cars, classic cars, small commercial vehicles and recreational vehicles such as golf buggies. 

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The unit weighs just 70kg and, measuring 600mm by 440mm by 280mm, is said to be appropriately sized for fitment into the engine bay of an original Mini or the frame of a quadbike. Swindon Powertrain also states that waterproofing options will enable it to be used in compact off-roaders. 

It claims that as well as operating as a standalone motor, the unit could also be used as the electric component in a hybrid vehicle’s drivetrain. 

The firm plans to put the unit into series production before June 2020 and will cover the cost of any necessary research and validation processes, which it says will further ease costs for buyers. 

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Comments
5

17 October 2019

They'd love that on Jackass!

17 October 2019
Is our electrical infrastructure capable of dealing with the mass adoption of EV's?

bol

17 October 2019
m2srt wrote:

Is our electrical infrastructure capable of dealing with the mass adoption of EV's?

If most people charge them at night (as they tend to, because it's cheapest) then yes. Google is your friend here. 

bol

17 October 2019

I've been waiting/hoping for this. It could do with being twice as powerful though to make it appealing in a sports car. I was recently quoted £40k+ to convert my mk1 Mx5 to electric with 200bhp and 150 miles of range! Fingers crosses within a few years it'll be more like £10k. 

17 October 2019
Can you use one per axle? Great for cheap 4WD EVs!

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