Brand chief executive is being held due to risk that he could withhold evidence. Group boss Herbert Diess said he was known as a 'problem solver'
2 July 2018

The arrest of Audi CEO Rupert Stadler was a "massive shock" for Volkswagen Group boss Herbert Diess, who described his colleague as a "problem solver".

Stadler has been in jail for two weeks, following an investigation on charges of fraud and misrepresentation as part of the Dieselgate emissions scandal.

Diess (below) told German newspaper Bild am Sonntag: "The arrest of a CEO of a major car brand - that's never happened before."

In the days that followed reports that Stadler would not return to his post, even if his name was cleared during trial, Diess said the arrest "is hard to comprehend".

Audi has temporarily placed its sales and marketing boss, Abraham Schot, at the helm. But a source, speaking to Automotive News Europe, said that the 55-year-old Stadler was not expected to return to the company, regardless of outcome.

"Should the accusations of the state prosecutors prove to be true, then it's a clear decision," said Diess.

Since his arrest, Stadler, who was in charge of Audi for eight years, has since been placed on leave by Audi.

"The accused was brought before the investigating judge, who ordered the execution of the pre-trial detention," the Munich public prosecutor's office said in a statement after Stadler's arrest.

As a reason for the arrest, the Munich public prosecutor's office cited "evidence suppression".

It added: "We cannot comment on the substance of our background in the light of the ongoing investigations. For Mr Stadler, the presumption of innocence continues to apply."

Stadler has continuously denied any wrongdoing in the Dieselgate scandal. Another Audi board member, Bernd Martens, was named as a key suspect by the Munich public prosecutor's office on 30 May.

German media reports suggested evidence obtained in the recent questioning of other former Audi officials link Stadler to possible diesel emissions manipulation from 2012 onwards.

Stadler’s detention came after German police and members of the Munich public prosecutor's office raided his private residence in Germany.

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Comments
8

18 June 2018
Somewhere in Stutgart, Muller must be saying in dramatic overtones: "O, my prophetic!"

19 June 2018
They'll pass him around like currency!

2 July 2018

This just gets better, here we have a prestige car making CEO being arrested, held in custody  and still  people buy from this very corrupt group Amazing .  It appears there is more to  come out this utterly unbelievable story  about to show how V W group has lied mis lead authorities and still they appear to think the world is against them  Shameful .

2 July 2018

This just gets better, here we have a prestige car making CEO being arrested, held in custody  and still  people buy from this very corrupt group Amazing .  It appears there is more to  come out this utterly unbelievable story  about to show how V W group has lied mis lead authorities and still they appear to think the world is against them  Shameful .

2 July 2018
What heinous act has VAG got to do to make the scales fall from their disciples eyes?

3 July 2018

I get the impression from commentsprovided, that the alledged breaking of the rules is already proven and we should all move to punishment.It is a massively complicated problem.I don't know, but are imported cars from the USA,China,Korea etc meeting the EU regulations 100%?Conversly,are imported,say Audi's imported to the US,not required to meet US regulations which I believe are "less stringent" than Europe?As I understand the regulation for emissions is that the "fleet of cars" from a manufacturer must achieve an average emission level target for the range,not specifically one model.Am I right in this assumption or not?

To me the agenda is to work against ICE,especially diesels,for no other reason than to push for electric vehicles,which we all know produce more bad emissions during production than what comes out of an exhaust.

So as the chiefs of the EU get into their A8 limos to go to the next meeting will they focus on the emissions from their car.I don't think so.

My analagy of this is like watching a close football game when the referee is the focus of attention because of his/hers interpretation of the rules,and not the players because the game was not allowed to flow.Why not work with the companies istead of against them.

garage man

3 July 2018
Gargae Man wrote:

I get the impression from commentsprovided, that the alledged breaking of the rules is already proven and we should all move to punishment.It is a massively complicated problem.I don't know, but are imported cars from the USA,China,Korea etc meeting the EU regulations 100%?Conversly,are imported,say Audi's imported to the US,not required to meet US regulations which I believe are "less stringent" than Europe?As I understand the regulation for emissions is that the "fleet of cars" from a manufacturer must achieve an average emission level target for the range,not specifically one model.Am I right in this assumption or not?

You're not.

4 July 2018

 Jason-recliner,there is an international group called ICCT who do group manufacturers into a band with "average" emission levels set.The word is average,and in addition as I have said previously,types of fuel,maintenance and driving habits will make any "level" irrelevant if the testing environmenmt is not met real time.Human nature will ensure this doesn't happen.In relation to fuel,ICCT work closely with petroleum manufacturers to improve the product to reduce emissions.

Reading the report the other word which jumps out at you is "accused".There has been no due process yet, so why not wait for this process to be completed.

ICCT also say imported vehicles to the EU sector have to met these emission levels,but I haven't heard of any other manufacturers being investigated the way the VAG group has.Does  this mean all imported diesels fully met the regulations? It's a hugely complicated problem,which on the surface, the arm chair critics will think it's immediately solveable,but the real fix is very difficult to achieve due to the complexity of the problem.

garage man

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