Cars that are leaving us soon can make a great bargain
13 June 2017

Spare a thought for all of these cars that hundreds or even thousands of engineers toiled over for months on end to develop – none of which will live beyond 2017.

Some have gone already – but should you shed a tear? In some cases you should, and dealers will be trying to shift them too, so it’s a great time to pick up a bargain.

Join the debate

Comments
16

13 June 2017
I think more than a few people noticed the Lexus LS. It's just that not many of them were in the UK. In the USA, the LS has taken a big bite out of Cadillac's and the German makers' market. If that had not been the case, the Lexus brand would have been stillborn.
Happy motoring

13 June 2017
The LS is a proper old school luxury car, especially in hybrid guise.

IIRC, it was tested to be quieter
or as quiet inside as a Rolls Phantom.

13 June 2017
Farewell to this generation of the LS a luxury car for the person who can see beyond what the "brand" of a car is.

13 June 2017
Yet another comment about the poor old LS!!

While I quite like the looks of it, it is clear that Lexus didn't actually want to sell this car in the UK. If you look at the Lexus website you will see that the starting price for a LS is OVER £100,000 !!!!! How they thought they could tempt buyers from S Class Mercs and 7 series BMWs with that pricing is a complete mystery for me.

It is an even bigger mystery when you discover a car that looks almost the same as the LS but starts at £20,000. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the quite appropriately named Skoda "Superb".

13 June 2017
martin_66 wrote:

It is an even bigger mystery when you discover a car that looks almost the same as the LS but starts at £20,000. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the quite appropriately named Skoda "Superb".

The LS and may look similar to you, but thats where the similarity ends. If I was in the market for an LS, I would not be looking at the Superb, and no, its not badge snobbery, they are nowhere as well engineered. If they were there would be no need to cheat on emissions.

13 June 2017
Citytiger wrote:
martin_66 wrote:

It is an even bigger mystery when you discover a car that looks almost the same as the LS but starts at £20,000. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the quite appropriately named Skoda "Superb".

The LS and may look similar to you, but thats where the similarity ends. If I was in the market for an LS, I would not be looking at the Superb, and no, its not badge snobbery, they are nowhere as well engineered. If they were there would be no need to cheat on emissions.

What, engineering to the tune of an extra £80,000? Even if you go for the top of the range Superb, you will save £65,000 over an LS, gain 4 wheel drive, spew out less CO2 (yes, even after VW's dieslegate), get the same performance, and have enough money left over to buy a brand new Porsche (or similar) and still have Change left over.

I don't work for Skoda, but I recognise a superb car when I see one, and I also recognise extraordinary foolishness (£100,000 for an LS).

13 June 2017
martin_66 wrote:
Citytiger wrote:
martin_66 wrote:

It is an even bigger mystery when you discover a car that looks almost the same as the LS but starts at £20,000. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the quite appropriately named Skoda "Superb".

The LS and may look similar to you, but thats where the similarity ends. If I was in the market for an LS, I would not be looking at the Superb, and no, its not badge snobbery, they are nowhere as well engineered. If they were there would be no need to cheat on emissions.

What, engineering to the tune of an extra £80,000? Even if you go for the top of the range Superb, you will save £65,000 over an LS, gain 4 wheel drive, spew out less CO2 (yes, even after VW's dieslegate), get the same performance, and have enough money left over to buy a brand new Porsche (or similar) and still have Change left over.

I don't work for Skoda, but I recognise a superb car when I see one, and I also recognise extraordinary foolishness (£100,000 for an LS).

Anybody with a brain worthy of the name, would by a used LS for peanuts. If I wanted a big luxury saloon it's where my money would go. Only nutters buy such cars new, unless they enough money be able to disregard the depreciation.

Citroëniste.

13 June 2017
martin_66 wrote:
Citytiger wrote:
martin_66 wrote:

It is an even bigger mystery when you discover a car that looks almost the same as the LS but starts at £20,000. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the quite appropriately named Skoda "Superb".

The LS and may look similar to you, but thats where the similarity ends. If I was in the market for an LS, I would not be looking at the Superb, and no, its not badge snobbery, they are nowhere as well engineered. If they were there would be no need to cheat on emissions.

What, engineering to the tune of an extra £80,000? Even if you go for the top of the range Superb, you will save £65,000 over an LS, gain 4 wheel drive, spew out less CO2 (yes, even after VW's dieslegate), get the same performance, and have enough money left over to buy a brand new Porsche (or similar) and still have Change left over.

I don't work for Skoda, but I recognise a superb car when I see one, and I also recognise extraordinary foolishness (£100,000 for an LS).

Wow tell me more about the 450bhp Superb, (you do realise the LS is AWD as well) but do carry on..

13 June 2017
The only LS available in the U.K. Has a 5 litre V8 which puts out 394 bhp, NOT 450. It does 0 - 60 in a leisurely 6.3 sec, and 155 mph flat out.

The most expensive Superb (£36,310) has a 2 litre 4 cylinder engine, puts out only 280 bhp, yet does 0-60 in 5.8 sec, with the same top speed.

Exactly what is that extra £63,000 buying you?

You can make whatever arguments you want in favour of the LS, ultimately what cannot be denied is that it is over priced and under achieving.

13 June 2017
martin_66 wrote:

...it is clear that Lexus didn't actually want to sell this car in the UK

Didn't want to, or couldn't? It's not just the UK it's Europe, which is the toughest, most discerning market - of developed regions, the US tolerates appliance-like commodity vehicles while Asian markets impose protectionist policies limiting competition. While great cars, Lexus (as well as Infiniti and Acura) target the US and do very well there but the natural side-affect is a less competitive product when applied to European markets.

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