In middling diesel-powered form, on which Autocar has taken performance figures, the Mk7 Golf is no more a car for petrolheads than the Mk6 or Mk5 were. For a start, it’s not particularly fast.

Directly comparable versions of the Volvo V40, Mercedes-Benz A-class, Honda Civic and Audi A3 have all undergone our road test treatment, and although wet conditions on our figuring day with the VW didn’t flatter, the Golf was slowest of the lot, taking four tenths of a second longer over a standing quarter mile than the intimately related Audi did.

Matt Saunders

Deputy road test editor
Long gearing means the Golf is shaded by rivals in the benchmark performance tests

Longer gearing explains that difference, and emphatically sums up the priorities that the Golf has been configured to serve. In third gear, the Golf goes more than 4mph faster than the Audi for every 1000rpm on the tacho; in top, the difference is 7.4mph per 1000rpm. The VW, then, is a long-legged cruiser of a family hatch devoted to unobtrusive ease of use.

The engine’s 236lb ft is delivered quietly and undramatically. The Golf pulls smoothly from well under 1500rpm and remains restrained and usable beyond 4500rpm. Throttle response is first rate, particularly when Sport mode is selected from the new driver profile menu that gently reprograms the throttle map and steering responses, and the light gearchange is precise and mechanical.

The entry-level diesel, the 1.6 TDI, isn't exactly fiery, either, although 0-62mph in 10.7sec is okay when you take into account its 104bhp. It runs out of breath a bit in higher gears on the motorway or when you need a bit more shove to overtake, and the gear ratios are widely spaced, especially between third and fifth, with fourth not quite enough of an in-between.

There's also a clever 1.4 petrol with cylinder deactivation (badged ACT), which is quiet, refined and not all peaky although there was a slight hesistation when pulling away. It's possible this was the cylinder deactivation. The 1.2 TSI offers credible smoothness.

The potent four-cylinder engine in the GTD is refined for a high-output diesel. More importantly, it’s responsive for an oil-burner and delivers a pretty potent turn of speed. The torquey dig you get as you flatten the accelerator comes promptly, and it’s hefty. The motor also seems happy enough to rev beyond 3500rpm, without rewriting the rulebook on the best way to get outright performance from a diesel: you're better off staying in the mid-range, in other words

More impressive, though, is the overall mechanical refinement from all the variants we've tried, with not a hint of vibration detectable through the controls.

The car’s quietness is all the more convincing because, at a cruise, the 2.0-litre diesel is spinning more slowly than it might be. It amounts to the overriding impression of a singularly obliging and effortless car to rub along with: qualities that, as any automotive engineer will tell you, are the hardest to produce for the mass market. And qualities possessed by all the Mk7 Golfs we've driven so far.

Top 5 Family hatches

  • More than 29 million Golfs have been sold since 1974

    Volkswagen Golf

    1
  • A big seller is the 113bhp 1.6-litre diesel in Zetec trim.

    Ford Focus

    2
  • Seat Leon SC
    Seat says that much of the inspiration for the SC comes from its IBE concept

    Seat Leon SC

    3
  • Mazda 3
    The SkyActiv platform used in the 3 features more high and ultra-high-strength steel, offering greater strength and less weight

    Mazda 3

    4
  • Peugeot 308
    The 308 marks the first time a carry-over name has been applied to an all-new Peugeot

    Peugeot 308

    5

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