From £59,746
Diesel four-door blends economy and refinement with success, but it’s a disappointing sports saloon

Our Verdict

Porsche Panamera
The Porsche Panamera was first launched in 2009 and revamped in 2013

Can the four-door Porsche Panamera still do what’s expected of a Porsche?

  • First Drive

    2016 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel review

    Its predecessor may have been a bit limp, but the Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel is crushingly rapid and suitably luxurious
  • First Drive

    2016 Porsche Panamera Turbo review

    Porsche has striven to make its Panamera even more luxurious this time around, but the four-seater retains the grip and pace to go with its increased refinement

What is it?

The car that ought to have BMW 535d owners queuing around the block, you’d think – this is Porsche’s new Panamera Diesel, a version of the firm’s five-metre four-door powered by the same 3.0-litre V6 turbodiesel lump you’ll find in anything upwards of an Audi A4. Available with rear-wheel drive only, and driven by an eight-speed torque converter automatic gearbox, this Panamera will be priced identically to the entry-level V6 petrol, at just over £60k. Unlike the petrol, however, it can put close to 800 miles between fills from the pump, and return almost 45mpg on the NEDC combined cycle.

What’s it like?

Comfortable, quiet, undemanding to drive – at once what you might want from a big grand tourer, and what you might not want from a Porsche.

And that’s to do with the Panamera Diesel’s positioning within the broader Panamera range more than anything else. Envisioned as an economy tourer rather than a proper performance diesel, this car’s brief was to better the Panamera S Hybrid’s economy, and provide an entry point to the Panamera range for Europeans with a taste for diesel-fuelled cars. That’s why it’s only blessed with a 247bhp V6 diesel engine, and lacks the outright performance of diesel models from supposedly less sporting brands.

And it’s also why it lacks the aura of dynamic indefatigability that other Porsches are famed for. This car has a chassis configured to offer a certain amount of reward for its driver, but also to smooth away mile after mile of motorway and gently flowing A-road. In those respects it’s very effective.

But delve into the car’s handling locker on a more uneven and twisty backroad and, now and again, this Porsche can be found wanting. It doesn’t roll much and holds the road well up to a point. While composed, the car has pleasing cornering balance and real turn of speed.

But when upset by short-wave undulations in the road surface, the Panamera Diesel surrenders its vertical body control surprisingly easily. With its suspension loaded through a corner, a sudden bump can cause the chassis to whack hard against its bump stop where you wouldn’t expect a true sports saloon to struggle. The car’s eight-speed automatic gearbox is also strangely reluctant to be hurried at times. This clearly isn’t a car to lean on; it’s one to be laid back in.

At this point we should point out that all of the cars on Porsche’s Panamera Diesel press launch had optional air springs fitted. In our experience, steel-sprung Panameras do have more precise body control and better shock absorption – but we couldn’t verify that in the case of the diesel. However, we’d be surprised if a simple change in chassis spec could give this car the dynamic precision, reserve and responsiveness that real enthusiasts may expect of it.

Still, if you’re prepared to take that more recumbent attitude, there’s plenty to like about the Panamera Diesel. Mechanically it’s very refined indeed, and a very special place in which to pass a few hundred miles, whether you’re seated up front or in the back. Our test car had beautiful leathers and veneers, seemed of extremely high quality, and offered as much passenger space as you’d find in all but the biggest limousines.

Should I buy one?

If you can come in with the right mindset, perhaps. Trouble is, you can’t help expecting fireworks of a Porsche, and this car fails to deliver them. Other diesel saloons are faster, better handling and more entertaining – and we can’t help thinking that’ll disappoint many.

Still, if you simply don’t require your diesel-engined Panamera to handle or perform quite as well as the petrols – if you’ve been waiting for a Porsche you can drive 800 miles in one sitting, and don’t care whether it’s as sporting as it could be – you’ll like this car. It’s certainly an unusually single-minded and long-legged GT; just not quite the driver’s car we were hoping for.

Porsche Panamera 3.0 Diesel

Price: £62,134; 0-62mph: 6.8sec; Top speed: 150mph; Economy: 44.8mpg; CO2 emissions: 167g/km; Kerb weight: 1880kg; Engine layout: V6, 2967cc, turbodiesel; Power: 247bhp at 3800-4400rpm; Torque: 406lb ft at 1750-2750rpm; Power to weight: 131bhp per tonne; Specific output: 83bhp per litre; Gearbox: 8-spd automatic

Join the debate

Comments
17

22 July 2011

The figures speak for it self - 247bhp in a large tourer?

Buy a BMW 535d or 740d and keep the rest for cheap women and wine!

if it's heavy, it ain't happenin' 

22 July 2011

I wouldn't buy it simply for how hideous it looks.

22 July 2011

Unfortunately I believe it will sell very well in Europe with all those people that only care about the badge. So many people will think that owning a Porsche will be much better for their image and ego than a better BMW, Mercedes, Audi.....

22 July 2011

soon there will be a Panamera S diesel.

and then, like know, the ones that really aim to get one, will don`t give a *** to those Bimmers, Mercs and all... and Jags too.

22 July 2011

[quote coolboy]

soon there will be a Panamera S diesel.

and then, like know, the ones that really aim to get one, will don`t give a *** to those Bimmers, Mercs and all... and Jags too.

[/quote]

Well said.

22 July 2011

[quote Lotus Man]

The figures speak for it self - 247bhp in a large tourer?

Buy a BMW 535d or 740d and keep the rest for cheap women and wine!

[/quote] What he said. ;)

22 July 2011

I read your blog and the thought 'don't drink and drive' should be something which also applies to you when you are blogging. Seriously, it'll help you be a bit more coherent.

22 July 2011

Its finally here guys, what we all have been waiting for a 4 door diesel Porsche Saloon. They have finally created a Porsche that is ugly, slow, pricey and boring, Oh wait they already made the Cayenne diesel. No doubt it will still sell.

Consider this after the Cayenne they are planning a smaller Cajun, anything that sells. So expect a smaller 4 door Porsche saloon with a 2 liter diesel delivering 60 miles to the gallon....ha ha lol!! Soon there will be a better Mondeo than a Porsche!!



22 July 2011

[quote coolboy]soon there will be a Panamera S diesel.[/quote]

As an entry model into the Panamera range having a 247 bhp diesel makes sense for those who can afford the purchase price but do not want high fuel costs. After all it is the only diesel powered Porsche available. It will be interesting to see what percentage of Panamera sales throughout Europe go to the diesel version and will Porsche bring out a 4.2 litre V8 version using the Audi engine called the Panamera S.

22 July 2011

[quote The Special One]

[quote Lotus Man]

The figures speak for it self - 247bhp in a large tourer?

Buy a BMW 535d or 740d and keep the rest for cheap women and wine!

[/quote] What he said. ;)[/quote]

For someone who can't stand Porsche, you have an uncanny consistency for reading and commenting on them.

I think Porsche should have upped the power a little just to make it slightly less obvious that it has an Audi engine in it. And I too fully expect the 4.2 TDI engine to enter the range, perhaps in about a years time.

The comments section needs a makeover... how about a forum??

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