From £37,9558
With an all-new, fifth-generation discovery around the corner, we revisit the current car in special-edition Landmark form

Our Verdict

Land Rover Discovery
The Discovery really is the defining go-anywhere super-utility vehicle

The Land Rover Discovery has an unbeatable combination of practicality, off-road ability and on-road manners

  • First Drive

    2016 Land Rover Discovery Landmark review

    With an all-new, fifth-generation discovery around the corner, we revisit the current car in special-edition Landmark form
  • First Drive

    Land Rover Discovery SDV6

    The Discovery is an exceptionally versatile vehicle: a grade-one off-roader, proper seven-seater and rapid and luxurious way to cover distances
19 January 2016

What is it?

It's difficult not to feel a little melancholy at the impending demise of Land Rover's Discovery 4. These days, as large SUVs go, it's heavy, thirsty and comparatively dirty, but few rivals have managed to trouble its combination of off-road ability, comfort and practicality since its introduction back in 2009.

The new Land Rover Discovery has been revealed - read more and get your first look here

Of course, part of its charm is how well it suits a range of situations. It looks as fitting gliding down the Kings Road as it does covered in mud while propping up a couple of point-to-point spectators and a hamper on its tailgate. The new car will be objectively better in every way, but if its more cutting-edge approach will look as comfortable abandoned outside the Horse and Hound, only time will tell.

Until that sleeker, lighter, aluminium-clad model arrives later this year, the 4 soldiers on in a total of seven different trims, but with only one engine choice: Land Rover's venerable 253bhp turbocharged 3.0 SDV6 diesel. Here we drive what will be one of the last special-edition models, the Landmark.

It costs a shade under £56,000 but is based on range-topping £60k HSE Luxury trim, bringing a near-£4000 saving. In addition to HSE Luxury's list, full-length roof rails in bright finish and black vents, grille and wing mirror caps come as standard. There's also an extended leather pack inside, in previously unavailable Tan, as well as five possible colours, including brand new Zanzibar copper. 

What's it like?

The 'doesn't feel ready to die' club is an exclusive one, occupied by some exceptional cars. The Discovery 4 probably isn't an honorary member, but it isn't far off.

The mechanical crow's-feet reveal themselves first in the form of stationary refinement - a push of the starter button (especially when cold) sends a small jolt through the cabin, and once settled to idle the six-cylinder diesel sends a continuous buzz through the controls.

Pull away, though, and the buzz turns to a silken smoothness, while at all speeds there's very little wind or roads noise to complain about. The 4's eight-speed gearbox slips up and down between ratios pretty much undetected, too.

The engine also behaves itself well under load. You're tipped back on your armchair slightly as you stamp down on the throttle, while a guttural but distant boom fills the cabin, but the V6 hauls all 2600kg up to motorway speeds with minimum fuss.

In fact, from your elevated position as the driver, and aside from the trees moving past more quickly, the only sense of gathering speed is ride quality. The Landmark's standard 20in rims and relatively stingy sidewalls offer less protection over sharp potholes and expansion joints. With more speed, however, comes less busyness to the ride and more of the Disco's trademark soft but compliant bob over undulating roads.

Bigger wheels don't mean better cornering, but then that's hardly the point. The steering is slow and not particularly precise, but once you've found your line and committed to it, you can rely of the 4's chassis to hang on to surprisingly high speeds through tight bends, albeit with plenty of lateral pitch. 

As well as the aforementioned superb visibility for the front passengers, the front two rows also benefit from huge space for four adults. Even a fifth in the middle row's central pew is possible, while another two six-footers will sit in the sixth and seventh seats in genuine comfort even on a long journey.

Access to the front two rows is brilliant, while folding and tumbling the middle row leaves lots of room to clamber up to the rearmost seats. The Discovery's boot in seven-seat mode is a very useable 280 litres to the roofline, while in five-seat mode that rises to a massive 1124 litres.

However, the 4's other Wogan's sideburn is its interior quality and infotainment. The buttons are large and clear, but they're starting to look and feel their age. Furthermore, while the on-screen graphics have brightened and sharpened over the years, the unresponsive, often cluttered menus are lagging behind those of the class’s best. 

At least there's a long list of equipment. Climate and cruise control, heated leather seats, a heated steering wheel, sat-nav, Bluetooth, DAB radio, adaptive xenon headlights and a Meridien surround-sound system are among the standard features. 

Should I buy one?

It's no wonder the 4's running costs, refinement, quality and infotainment are feeling dated, but if you compare it to cars such as Audi's Q7, Volvo's XC90 and BMW X5, all have moved the game on in these respects.

True, none is ultimately as spacious, nor offers the Discovery's greater off-road ability. All, though, offer better dynamics, cleaner, more frugal engines, similar if not better interior quality, superior infotainment systems and more agreeable refinement. In short, all have been launched or revised recently, and it shows.

Still, there'd be no shame in forgetting all that and deciding on the Discovery. It remains, even this close to the end, a well-rounded package, and in Landmark form looks like decent value to boot. 

Land Rover Discovery Landmark 

Location Kent; On sale Now; Price £55,995; Engine V6, 2993cc, turbocharged, diesel; Power 253bhp at 4000rpm; Torque 443lb ft at 2000rpm; Gearbox 8-spd auto; Kerb weight 2622kg; 0-62mph 8.8sec; Top speed 112mph; Economy 36.7mpg (combined); CO2 rating & BIK tax band 203g/km, 37%

 

Join the debate

Comments
13

19 January 2016

"It's no wonder the 4's running costs, refinement, quality and infotainment are feeling dated, but if you compare it to cars such as Audi's Q7, Volvo's XC90 and BMW X5, all have moved the game on in these respects.

True, none is ultimately as spacious, nor offers the Discovery's greater off-road ability. All, though, offer better dynamics, cleaner, more frugal engines, similar if not better interior quality, superior infotainment systems and more agreeable refinement. In short, all have been launched or revised recently, and it shows."

Geez not a lot of positives there....oh but a 4 star 80% car. Did you hear the one about a car magazine who's pockets are lined by a well know UK based prestige car company?

19 January 2016

"It's no wonder the 4's running costs, refinement, quality and infotainment are feeling dated, but if you compare it to cars such as Audi's Q7, Volvo's XC90 and BMW X5, all have moved the game on in these respects.

True, none is ultimately as spacious, nor offers the Discovery's greater off-road ability. All, though, offer better dynamics, cleaner, more frugal engines, similar if not better interior quality, superior infotainment systems and more agreeable refinement. In short, all have been launched or revised recently, and it shows."

Geez not a lot of positives there....oh but a 4 star 80% car. Did you hear the one about a car magazine who's pockets are lined by a well know UK based prestige car company?

20 January 2016

Have you driven one? I understand where you're coming from on the face of your quote sample but seriously - they're not being biased, Disco4 is a bit of a misnoma... yes it is almost out of date but it's definitely a 4 star. I don't own one but have driven a few, they're just really really good and hard not to like day to day.

20 January 2016
S2bear wrote:

Have you driven one? I understand where you're coming from on the face of your quote sample but seriously - they're not being biased, Disco4 is a bit of a misnoma... yes it is almost out of date but it's definitely a 4 star. I don't own one but have driven a few, they're just really really good and hard not to like day to day.

Yes driven many. They are fine in isolation. The issue is not the car (apart from the well documented atrocious reliability compared to its peers) but the review and the rating system. If this car wore a Lexus badge, or even worse an Infiniti badge it would be a 3 star car. JLR court the UK press very well and it shows.

19 January 2016

Yawn yawn. Yes autocar hasn't any other advertisers have they!!

20 January 2016
kowalski99 wrote:

Yawn yawn. Yes autocar hasn't any other advertisers have they!!

It doesn't stop the magazine and it's writers making itself look continually stupid by contradicting itself in it's reviews of certain marques. At least have the balls to tell it like it is and then grade the vehicles in question honestly rather than point out all of their deficiencies when compared to their key rivals and then still rate them as high if not higher than the competition, it just looks dumb. This and posters like Roadster and Saucerer don't breed admiration for the brands in question just contempt which surely is the opposite of what they are setting out to do?

19 January 2016

Yawn yawn. Yes autocar hasn't any other advertisers have they!!

20 January 2016

Depreciation is low, so it's cheap to run (relatively), it's great to own and drive, the kids love it, it can take a beating and clean up well, and like the Defender, a Mini or a Golf, it has a class of its own. I'm sure its replacement will be £20k more expensive, I hope it does the job just as well.

20 January 2016

Depreciation is low, so it's cheap to run (relatively), it's great to own and drive, the kids love it, it can take a beating and clean up well, and like the Defender, a Mini or a Golf, it has a class of its own. I'm sure its replacement will be £20k more expensive, I hope it does the job just as well.

20 January 2016

It also has, like other LR products, a dreadful reputation for unreliability, so much so that it was given a new name in America in the hope that buyers wouldn't associate it with previous Discoveries.

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