From £29,375
Borrowing the XFR's suspension and styling brings mixed results for the diesel XF

Our Verdict

Jaguar XF 2008-2015
The Jaguar XF is a sublime British executive saloon. It has a tremendous interior and even greater dynamics

The Jaguar XF is a sublime British executive saloon. It has a tremendous interior and even greater dynamics

8 May 2010

What is it?

A diesel that wants to be an XFR. In an effort to differentiate the two versions of 3.0 V6 diesel available in the XF, Jaguar is now offering a couple of tempting options for the higher powered 271bhp S model.

A £1500 ‘Aerodynamic Pack’ gives the diesel a touch of the XFR, with bolstered sills and a more aggressive front. While not an exact replica of 503bhp supercharged R model, this does give the XF a stronger visual stance. LED running lights are also available for an additional £500.

Available separately, or in conjunction with the Aero Pack, is a Dynamics Pack that adds continuously variable dampers, until now only seen on the XFR, and 20” Volans alloys. It is worth noting though, that this pack does not bring an E-Diff to the Diesel.

Inside the S now gets the leather sports seats from the XFR as standard, and can optionally be specified with Piano Black veneer and alcantara-style headlining.

What’s it like?

Obviously you can make up your own mind on the merits of the Aero Pack so we’ll leave that and concentrate instead on the Dynamics Pack. The first thing to say is that the differences are subtle, so subtle that you’d really need to drive a regular S and one with the pack fitted, back-to-back to notice the difference.

Luckily I could do just that. The result is not entirely unpredictable; with the adaptive dampers fitted the XF has slightly better body control and a more responsive front end. But the truth is that the standard car is hardly shabby in this respect, and you really have to be really pushing on to get to benefit from the tighter control.

Furthermore, while Jaguar claim that this improvement in agility comes with no loss in comfort, I disagree. Both XF’s I drove had 20” alloys fitted, and the adaptive car suffered more fidget at slow-to-medium speeds. We are taking about a small degradation here, but one that takes the shine off one the XF’s best qualities; its ability to ease away the miles.

Should I buy one?

Clearly there is always a trade off between agility and comfort, but it is that very fact that makes standard XF such an achievement. For mixed road use it is just so well judged. While the £1250 Dynamics Pack furthers the XF’s abilities in some areas, it is not without compromises in others. The best advice is to try both before you buy, but personally I’d stick with the standard car.

Jamie Corstorphine

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Comments
4

12 May 2010

Someone at Jag's press office's been telling you porkies, Jamie. The scintillating acceleration figure of sub-six secs. is for 0-60 mph, not 0-100 km/h. The figure for 0-62 mph is 6.4 secs, not quite so impressive - check Jag's own web site for official figs.

The point is, this spec'ed up £48k Jag is only a few fractions of a second quicker 0.1 secs slower than the BMW 530d, at £37k on the road. Jag is seriously stretching credibility with its prices, up against the 530d and soon to be engine-upgraded Merc E350CDI(260 hp) at £36k. And £500 for daytime LEDs!? These 'aero' specials and fanciful pricing suggest Jag is losing its way, with the commercial men at Gaydon getting the upper hand, maximising short-term profits for longer term disadvantage.

Otherwise good report, again. Your objectivity is commendable.

12 May 2010

Excellent motor journalism. Clear, objective and informed.

Bring back steel wheels.

12 May 2010

Great report, tells it like it is.


Went to look at the XF the other day (have a friend on his third!) - came away very impressed, the standard kit offered is fairly good, but the options list, and pricing, reminded me of early nineties BMWs and Mercedes...


Some prices are just ridiculous - like the £500 for LED lamps - some form of daylight running lamp will be standard next year I think under EU regs anyway! The cost of a rear trim for the exhaust is over £120, for a small bit of chrome, that does not look any better anyway- but I suppose looks and taste are objective!!

What next, £150 for a chrome side vent...oh sorry already do that!!

To live is to drive

12 May 2010

[quote nicksheele]The point is, this spec'ed up £48k Jag is only a few fractions of a second quicker 0.1 secs slower than the BMW 530d, at £37k on the road. Jag is seriously stretching credibility with its prices, up against the 530d and soon to be engine-upgraded Merc E350CDI(260 hp) at £36k[/quote]

Nick, you're sounding so much like Horse'n'cart these days it's comical. All you need is the personal insults and you'll be there. . .

As for your 'comparisons', if you'd looked at the BMW site as well you might have noticed that the BMW price you quoted doesn't include satnav, xenons, decent audio/DAB, heated seats, adaptive drive and so much more it's crazy. They do list as standard an 'integral rear axle' though, which is a relief.

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