This Jaguar XF Sportbrake was a long time coming. The Jaguar XF was first introduced in 2008 – and fantastically good it was, and remains.

But since then the range has expanded with all the pace of a blimp filled with a foot pump.

It took until the saloon's facelift in 2011 for Jaguar to introduce a small four-cylinder diesel engine of the type that is the staple of all of its rivals’ ranges. And it took until 2012, a full four and a half years since XF deliveries started, for the Sportbrake, to arrive.

Still, now it’s here. Essentially, it's the estate version of the saloon, albeit one which has prioritised sporty styling over outright luggage capacity, hence the Sportbrake moniker. As such, the range also mirrors that of the diesel line-up in the XF saloon.

You can have 161bhp or 197bhp variants of the 2.2-litre four-pot diesel, or the 3.0-litre V6 diesel in 237bhp or 271bhp form. All are mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission but, reflecting the fleet-oriented market for cars like these, there are no petrol Sportbrake variants around. Not even a Jaguar XFR.

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