From £37,366
Infiniti’s first hybrid promises the best of both worlds

Our Verdict

Infiniti M
The Infiniti M is aimed squarely at its established rivals rather than being an alternative to them

The Infiniti M is a likeable and capable, if expensive, alternative to the obvious

  • First Drive

    Infiniti M35h GT Premium

    Quick, well made hybrid exec, but lacks the classy all-round dynamics of its rivals
  • First Drive

    Infiniti M30d GT Premium

    New diesel executive saloon holds its own next to rivals from BMW, Mercedes and Jaguar
30 July 2010

What’s new?

Almost everything. Not only is this our first chance to drive Infiniti’s new M-line BMW 5-Series and Audi A6 rival, but also the brand’s first hybrid production car. While parent company Nissan has sold hybrid cars in the US using technology licensed from Toyota, the M35h is the first car within the group to use a new system developed in-house.

See the test pics of the new Infiniti M35h

What’s it like?

Although our test drive was short and on a track it gave an opportunity to gauge how the M range will stack up against its European competitors for interior packaging and refinement. First to arrive in the UK is the petrol M37, with the diesel M30d arriving in the autumn. The range topping Hybrid model won’t arrive before 2011.

The M marks a continued upward trend in the quality of Infiniti interiors, with most materials sufficiently upmarket. A new BMW 5-series is more consistent in its quality, but, in my opinion at least, the M has a more interesting shaped and well-equipped cabin. The driving position, despite the wide transmission tunnel, is good. Although the rear cabin offers decent legroom, it is worth noting that at 4945mm the M35h is longer than the equivalent BMW or Mercedes.

Compared to Lexus’s GS450h, Infiniti’s hybrid system is technically more simple however this does mean that it weighs less and is more economical to produce.

Still it is possible to pull away on electric power alone, and in theory the M35h can be driven on its electric motor up to speeds of 60mph. However in practice this is unlikely given the 1.3Kw capacity of the lithium-ion batteries and the fact that much more than 20 per cent throttle has the petrol cutting in.

While the transition is perceptible, it is well managed, and because the M35h uses a conventional automatic gearbox, albeit one with a clutch rather than torque converter, it is spared the CVT whine normally associated with hybrid drive. Instead under hard acceleration you get the rather pleasant sound of Nissan/Infiniti’s 3.5-litre V6, except with slightly more performance that you’d normally except.

Although Infiniti are yet to release official performance and consumption figures, it has confirmed that the M35h will outperform the petrol for acceleration and the diesel for fuel consumption. Which means a 0-60mph time close to six seconds, over 34.0mpg and a sub 200g/km Co2 figure.

With such performance it is perhaps surprising that the M35h will only be available in Infiniti’s comfort orientated GT specification, with a maximum wheel size of 18in.

And if there was a disappointment in our brief test it was that the M35h lacked a little of the dynamism we have come to expect from Infiniti. There is still a discernable rear-drive bias, but the M feels heavier and less agile. Perhaps a consequence of the extra 120kg the hybrid system adds. However Infiniti Europe may yet tune the suspension before it goes on sale here.

Should I buy one?

Prices are yet to be announced, but the M35h will certainly be the most expensive model in the M range (that is unless Infinti choose to import the 414bhp V8 M56). Which means a price in excess of £40,000.

Whether it’s worth that much will have to wait until we can put its ‘jack-of-all-trades’ claims to the test, but so far it looks promising.

Jamie Corstorphine

Infiniti M35h

Price: £43,000 (est); Top speed: 155mph (limited); 0-62mph: 6.1sec (est); Economy: NA (34mpg est) Co2: NA (190g/km est); Kerbweight: 1900kg (est); Engine type: 3498cc, V6, petrol plus electric motor; Installation: front, longitudinal, RWD; Power: 302bhp from petrol motor, 67bhp from electric motor, 369bhp combined; Torque: 258lb ft at 5000rpm from petrol motor, 199lb ft at 1000-1500rpm from electric motor; Gearbox: 7-spd automatic

See all the latest Infiniti M-Series reviews, news and video

Join the debate

Comments
17

30 July 2010

Looks awesome! Makes BMW's 5-series look like being designed back in 1993!

This car has personality, it's different, bold and makes me want one. All I need is an estate version, would look great! Bring it, Infiniti!

30 July 2010

Styling a bit contrived but at least it's not some bland box. The Infiniti Mesh, he he...


30 July 2010

Infiniti should've styled their introductory cars in a more generic fashion. This one seems particularily ostentatious.. a real turn off.

30 July 2010

Is it me, or does every Infiniti model get really good write ups in Autocar? They've gotta be good cars, one assumes.

30 July 2010

This article needs an editor.

30 July 2010

What do you mean, the battery has 1.3Kw capacity? Do you mean 1.3kWh?? You haven't even got the abbreviation for kilowatts correct, it's kW no Kw. Can we have someone with at least a little bit of technical knowledge writing for Autocar, please?

31 July 2010

[quote Overdrive]Is it me, or does every Infiniti model get really good write ups in Autocar? They've gotta be good cars, one assumes.[/quote]

Can't speak for the current models but we had a Q45 when we lived in the US a long time ago. It was a real sleeper - very quick and very invisible. It was almost hand-made. Really good quality. I think that they set out to build cars which were actually good to drive unlike most Lexi!

31 July 2010

I got G35 Coupe A.K.A Skyline 350GT in Aus and very happy with the quality and yes, it always surprises people with how fast it is, yet looking very subtle and docile.

Come on Nissan bring infinity to Aus as well


31 July 2010

[quote bomb]The Infiniti Mesh, he he...[/quote]

Didn't see that till you pointed it out! Bravo!

[quote beachland2]This article needs an editor.[/quote]

[quote Ryan Bane]and you need a lower horse.[/quote]

Priceless!

[quote Scandinavian]Looks awesome! Makes BMW's 5-series look like being designed back in 1993!

This car has personality, it's different, bold and makes me want one. All I need is an estate version, would look great! Bring it, Infiniti! [/quote]

While I admire the front end, the back is as bland as any mid 90s Japenese saloon. The 5 Series is also bland, but at least it looks premium. This looks like a modern day Primera.

  • 1 August 2010

    It looks horrid, like a big SUV up front and a fish on the sides. That interior makes me dizzy. Why buy this? No one buys it anywhere for it being better, just cheaper. Its like saying " I like driving fail". What is also confusing is they are late with hybrids and Lexus dominates here. They should have done something else. As stated, a great 2nd hand buy in 2 years when its worth nothing

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